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  • Draper, Catherine E.
    et al.
    Tomaz, Simone A.
    Stone, Matthew
    Hinkley, Trina
    Jones, Rachel A.
    Louw, Johann
    Twine, Rhian
    Kahn, Kathleen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana.
    Norris, Shane A.
    Developing Intervention Strategies to Optimise Body Composition in Early Childhood in South Africa2017In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, 5283457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The purpose of this research was to collect data to inform intervention strategies to optimise body composition in South African preschool children. Methods. Data were collected in urban and rural settings. Weight status, physical activity, and gross motor skill assessmentswere conducted with 341 3-6-year-old children, and 55 teachers and parents/caregivers participated in focus groups. Results. Overweight and obesity were a concern in low-income urban settings (14%), but levels of physical activity and gross motor skills were adequate across all settings. Focus group findings from urban and rural settings indicated that teachers would welcome input on leading activities to promote physical activity and gross motor skill development. Teachers and parents/caregivers were also positive about young children being physically active. Recommendations for potential intervention strategies include a teacher-training component, parent/child activitymornings, and a home-based component for parents/caregivers. Conclusion. The findings suggest that an intervention focussed on increasing physical activity and improving gross motor skills per se is largely not required but that contextually relevant physical activity and gross motor skills may still be useful for promoting healthy weight and a vehicle for engaging with teachers and parents/caregivers for promoting other child outcomes, such as cognitive development.

  • Schwartz, Yuri B.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Cavalli, Giacomo
    Three-Dimensional Genome Organization and Function in Drosophila2017In: Genetics, ISSN 0016-6731, E-ISSN 1943-2631, Vol. 205, no 1, 5-24 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how the metazoan genome is used during development and cell differentiation is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that three-dimensional (3D) chromosome organization plays important regulatory roles in this process and recent technological advances started to reveal connections at the molecular level. Here we will consider general features of the architectural organization of the Drosophila genome, providing historical perspective and insights from recent work. We will compare the linear and spatial segmentation of the fly genome and focus on the two key regulators of genome architecture: insulator components and Polycomb group proteins. With its unique set of genetic tools and a compact, well annotated genome, Drosophila is poised to remain a model system of choice for rapid progress in understanding principles of genome organization and to serve as a proving ground for development of 3D genome-engineering techniques.

  • Rasouli, Omid
    et al.
    Fors, Egil A.
    Borchgrevink, Petter Chr
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Stensdotter, Ann-Katrin
    Gross and fine motor function in fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome2017In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 10, 303-309 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aimed to investigate motor proficiency in fine and gross motor function, with a focus on reaction time (RT) and movement skill, in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods: A total of 60 individuals (20 CFS, 20 FM, and 20 HC), age 19-49 years, participated in this study. Gross motor function in the lower extremity was assessed using a RT task during gait initiation in response to an auditory trigger. Fine motor function in the upper extremity was measured during a precision task (the Purdue Pegboard test) where the number of pins inserted within 30 s was counted. Results: No significant differences were found between FM and CFS in any parameters. FM and CFS groups had significantly longer RT than HC in the gait initiation (p=0.001, and p=0.004 respectively). In the Purdue Pegboard test, 20% in the FM group, 15% in the CFS groups, and 0% of HC group, scored below the threshold of the accepted performance. However, there were no significant differences between FM, CFS, and HC in this task (p=0.12). Conclusion: Compared to controls, both CFS and FM groups displayed significantly longer RT in the gait initiation task. Generally, FM patients showed the worst results in both tests, although no group differences were found in fine motor control, according to the Purdue Pegboard test.

  • Jonsson, David
    et al.
    Burström, Lage
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nilsson, Tohr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Wahlström, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Pettersson, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Association between Pain in Adolescence and Low Back Pain in Adulthood: Studying a Cohort of Mine Workers2017In: Pain Research and Treatment, ISSN 2090-1542, E-ISSN 2090-1550, Vol. 2017, 3569231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To study the association of self-reported pain in adolescence with low back pain (LBP) in adulthood among mine workers and, also, study associations between the presence of LBP over 12-month or one-month LBP intensity during a health examination and daily ratings of LBP three and nine months later. Methods: Mixed design with data collected retrospectively, cross-sectionally, and prospectively. Data was collected using a questionnaire during a health examination and by using self-reported daily ratings of LBP three and nine months after the examination. Results: Pain prevalence during teenage years was 55% and it was 59% at age 20. Pain during teenage years had a relative risk of 1.33 (95% confidence interval 1.03-1.73) of LBP 12 months prior to the health examination, but with no associations with LBP intensity or LBP assessed by text messaging. Pain at age 20 years was not associated with any measure of LBP in adulthood. Daily ratings of LBP were associated with LBP during the health examination three and nine months earlier. Conclusions: There were no clear associations between self-reported pain in adolescence and LBP in adulthood. Self-reported daily ratings of LBP were associated with LBP from the health examination. Possible limitations for this study were the retrospective design and few participants.

  • Olsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    GeoGebra, Enhancing Creative Mathematical Reasoning2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis consists of four articles and this summarizing part. All parts have focused on bringing some insights into how to design a didactical situation including dynamic software (GeoGebra) to support students’ mathematical problem solving and creative reasoning as means for learning. The four included articles are:

    I. Granberg, C., & Olsson, J. (2015). ICT-supported problem solving and collaborative creative reasoning: Exploring linear functions using dynamic mathematics software. The Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 37, 48-62.

    II. Olsson, J. (2017). The Contribution of Reasoning to the Utilization of Feedback from Software When Solving Mathematical Problems. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 1-21.

    III. Olsson, J. Relations between task design and students’ utilization of GeoGebra. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. (Under review)

    IV. Olsson, J., & Granberg, C. Dynamic software, problem solving with or without guidelines, and learning outcome. Technology, Knowledge and Learning. (Under review)

    Background

    A common way of teaching mathematics is to provide students with solution methods, for example strategies and algorithms that, if followed correctly, will solve specific tasks. However, questions have been raised whether these teaching methods will support students to develop general mathematical competencies, such as problem solving skills, ability to reason and acquire mathematical knowledge. To merely follow provided methods students might develop strategies of memorizing procedures usable to solve specific tasks rather than drawing general conclusions. If students instead of being provided with algorithms, are given the responsibility to construct solution methods, they may produce arguments for why the method will solve the task. There is research suggesting that if those arguments are based on mathematics they are more likely to develop problem solving and reasoning-skill, and learn the included mathematics better. In such didactic situations, where students construct solutions, it is important that students have instructions and tasks that frame the activity and clarify goals without revealing solution methods. Furthermore, the environment must be responsive. That is, students need to receive responses on their actions. If students have an idea on how to solve (parts of) the given problem they need to test their method and receive feedback to verify or falsify ideas and/or hypotheses. Such activities could be supported by dynamic software. Dynamic software such as GeoGebra provides features that support students to quickly and easily create mathematical objects that GeoGebra will display as visual representations like algebraic expressions and corresponding graphs. These representations are dynamically linked, if anything is changed in one representation the other representations will be altered accordingly, circumstances that could be used to explore and investigate different aspects and relations of these objects. The first three studies included in the thesis investigate in what way GeoGebra supports creative reasoning and collaboration. These studies focus questions about how students apply feedback from GeoGebra to support their reasoning and how students utilize the potentials of GeoGebra to construct solutions during problem solving. The fourth study examine students’ learning outcome from solving tasks by constructing their methods.

    Methods

    A didactical situation was designed to engage students in problem solving and reasoning supported by GeoGebra. That is, the given problems were not accompanied with any guidelines how to solve the task and the students were supposed to construct their own methods supported by GeoGebra. The students were working in pairs and their activities and dialogues were recorded and used as data to analyse their engagement in reasoning and problem solving together with their use of GeoGebra. This design was used in all four studies. A second didactical situation, differing only with respect of providing students with guidelines how to solve the task was designed. These didactical situations were used to compare students’ use of GeoGebra, their engagement in problem solving and reasoning (study III) and students’ learning outcome (study IV) whether the students solved the task with or without guidelines. In the fourth study a quantitative method was applied. The data from study IV consisted of students’ results during training (whether they managed to solve the task or not), their results on the post-test, and their grades. Statistical analysis where applied.

    Results

    The results of the first three studies show qualitative aspects of students solving of task with assistance of GeoGebra. GeoGebra was shown to support collaboration, creative mathematical reasoning, and problem solving by providing students with a shared working space and feedback on their actions. Students used GeoGebra to test their ideas by formulating and submitting input according to their questions and hypotheses. GeoGebra’ s output was then used as feedback to answer questions and verify/falsify hypotheses. These interactions with GeoGebra were used to move the constructing of solutions forward. However, the way students engage in problem solving and reasoning, and using GeoGebra to do so, is dependent on whether they were provided with guidelines or not. Study III and IV showed that merely the students who solved unguided tasks utilized the potential of GeoGebra to explore and investigate the given task. Furthermore, the unguided students engaged to a larger extent in problem solving and creative reasoning and they expressed a greater understanding of their solutions. Finally study IV showed that the students who managed to solve the unguided task outperformed, on posttest the students who successfully solved the guided task.

    Conclusions

    The aim of this thesis was to bring some insights into how to design a didactical situation, including dynamic software (GeoGebra), to support students' mathematical problem solving and creative reasoning as means for learning. Taking the results of the four studies included in this thesis as a starting point, one conclusion is that a didactical design that engage students to construct solutions by creative reasoning supported by GeoGebra may enhance their learning of mathematics. Furthermore, the mere presence of GeoGebra will not ensure that students will utilize its potential for exploration and analysis of mathematical concepts and relations during problem solving. The design of the given tasks will affect if this will happen or not. The instructions of the task should include clear goals and frames for the activity, but no guidelines for how to construct the solution. It was also found that when students reasoning included predictive argumentation for the outcomes of operations carried out by the software, they could better utilize the potential of GeoGebra than if they just, for example, submitted an algebraic representation of a linear function and then focused on interpreting the graphical output.

  • Kasparek, Petr
    et al.
    Ileninova, Zuzana
    Zbodakova, Olga
    Kanchev, Ivan
    Benada, Oldrich
    Chalupsky, Karel
    Brattsand, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Beck, Inken M.
    Sedlacek, Radislav
    KLK5 and KLK7 Ablation Fully Rescues Lethality of Netherton Syndrome-Like Phenotype2017In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 13, no 1, e1006566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe skin disease caused by the loss of protease inhibitor LEKTI, which leads to the dysregulation of epidermal proteases and severe skin-barrier defects. KLK5 was proposed as a major protease in NS pathology, however its inactivation is not sufficient to rescue the lethal phenotype of LEKTI-deficient mice. In this study, we further elucidated the in vivo roles of the epidermal proteases in NS using a set of mouse models individually or simultaneously deficient for KLK5 and KLK7 on the genetic background of a novel NS-mouse model. We show that although the ablation of KLK5 or KLK7 is not sufficient to rescue the lethal effect of LEKTI-deficiency simultaneous deficiency of both KLKs completely rescues the epidermal barrier and the postnatal lethality allowing mice to reach adulthood with fully functional skin and normal hair growth. We report that not only KLK5 but also KLK7 plays an important role in the inflammation and defective differentiation in NS and KLK7 activity is not solely dependent on activation by KLK5. Altogether, these findings show that unregulated activities of KLK5 and KLK7 are responsible for NS development and both proteases should become targets for NS therapy.

  • Eliasson, Elias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Musik i förskolan: En kvalitativ studie om förskollärares syn på musikensbetydelse i förskolan2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta examensarbete undersöker sex stycken förskollärares syn på användandet av musik. Jag har besökt fem förskolor. Metoden jag använt är kvalitativ intervjumetod. Frågeställningarna jag har ställt är: Hur arbetar förskollärare med musik i förskolan? Vilken roll anser förskollärare att musik har för lärande? Hur trygga känner sig förskollärare med att användamusik? En rad olika arbetssätt kom fram genom intervjuerna: Lyssna på inspelad musik i cd spelare eller digitala medier som Youtube och Spotify, för bland annat sinnestämningar, till dans och rörelse lekar och till när barnen målar. Samtliga förskollärare sjöng sånger i samlingar eller spontant under dagen. Spela på instrument såsom handtrummor, marackas och trianglar var det många som gjorde med barnen. Endast två stycken förskollärare spelade gitarr med barnen. Det framgick även att vissa av förskollärarna använde sig av Ipad för att ge barnen en annan typ av musikupplevelse, genom att ha appar installerade på ipaden som förskollärarna kunde ta fram åt barnen, som de kunde spela på. Samtliga förskollärare ansåg att musik är ett väldigt användbart verktyg för att lära barnen språk, matematik och socialisation, som exempel. Förskollärarna ansåg även att musik är något som upplevs genom kroppen, som bygger självkänsla och identitet för barnen. Med andra ord att musik är något som har värde i sig självt, inte endast en metod för att lära något annat. Jag analyserar resultaten genom sex olika dimensioner i musik kunskap, som Riddersporre & Söderman (2014) presenterar: Strukturell, Akustisk, Emotionell, Existentiell, Kroppslig och Spänningsmässig musikalisk kunskap. Det som jag kom fram till är att det är det emotionella, existentiella och det kroppsliga som sätts i fokus, då samtliga förskollärarna pratar utifrån att ge barnen en upplevelse inom musik, inte att de ska lära sig teorin bakom musik, som tillexempel tonarter, tonhöjder eller takt. Kunskapen finns där, men det är inte det som förskollärarna har satt fokus på, det är mer informell kunskap som kommer till uttryck när vissa av förskollärarna spelar på gitarren till exempel, eller när barnen använder digitala verktyg, som då till exempel Ipad.

  • Goretti, Daniela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Biosciences, University of Milan, Via Celoria 26, Milan, Italy.
    Martignago, Damiano
    Landini, Martina
    Brambilla, Vittoria
    Gomez-Ariza, Jorge
    Gnesutta, Nerina
    Galbiati, Francesca
    Collani, Silvio
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Takagi, Hiroki
    Terauchi, Ryohei
    Mantovani, Roberto
    Fornara, Fabio
    Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Mechanisms Limit Heading Date 1 (Hd1) Function to Adapt Rice to High Latitudes2017In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 13, no 1, e1006530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rice flowering is controlled by changes in the photoperiod that promote the transition to the reproductive phase as days become shorter. Natural genetic variation for flowering time has been largely documented and has been instrumental to define the genetics of the photoperiodic pathway, as well as providing valuable material for artificial selection of varieties better adapted to local environments. We mined genetic variation in a collection of rice varieties highly adapted to European regions and isolated distinct variants of the long day repressor HEADING DATE 1 (Hd1) that perturb its expression or protein function. Specific variants allowed us to define novel features of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. We demonstrate that a histone fold domain scaffold formed by GRAIN YIELD, PLANT HEIGHT AND HEADING DATE 8 (Ghd8) and several NF-YC subunits can accommodate distinct proteins, including Hd1 and PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 37 (PRR37), and that the resulting OsNF-Y complex containing Hd1 can bind a specific sequence in the promoter of HEADING DATE 3A (Hd3a). Artificial selection has locally favored an Hd1 variant unable to assemble in such heterotrimeric complex. The causal polymorphism was defined as a single conserved lysine in the CCT domain of the Hd1 protein. Our results indicate how genetic variation can be stratified and explored at multiple levels, and how its description can contribute to the molecular understanding of basic developmental processes.

  • Holmkvist, Erika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Läs- och skrivsvårigheter: Varför och hur fungerar det för elever i gymnasiet?2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to investigate how three secondary students with reading and writing disabilities are being supported in the classroom. What teaching methods and adaptations are applied in the classroom to support students in reading and writing? How do students respond to these methods? And what are the experiences of the support and adjustments that are made according to two of their teachers? The study consists of classroom observations and interviews with three students with reading and writing disabilities and dyslexia. It also includes interviews with two teachers, who teach these students in three different courses. There is a very obvious conclusion that teachers that reach out in their teaching and have a good relation with the students succeed in understanding and finding the students’ ability to learn, as stated by several researchers. In this study the teachers do not have a special educational background, but still they seem up to date with what works, and what does not work in the classroom. Also, the teachers do not distinguish between students, on the contrary they seem to adjust their teaching to support all their students, by simplifying, communicating, and making use of different teaching methods. Altogether, students and teachers feel they can cope with the situation, even though there is a sense of insufficiency among at least one of the teachers. The students think the teachers are competent, and they all agree upon the fact that they get the support they need, even if some lessons are hard and difficult to follow. 

     

  • Lindberg, Emil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Limiting factors of periphytic algae in Arctic streams2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Algae are the most common primary producers in stream ecosystems, contributing as much as 80 % of the total primary production. The production of these ecosystems is strongly influenced by the terrestrial habitats, which are in turn likely to be altered by climate change.

    In arctic ecosystems, where the effects of climate may be most pronounced, there are important unknowns about how abiotic factors such as light, temperature, nutrients, flow regimes interact to influence stream productivity. This study therefore aimed to understand what controls the rate of benthic algal growth in Arctic streams by measuring the accumulation of algal biomass on artificial surfaces across arctic stream types in Norrbotten, Sweden. Ceramic tiles were placed at 36 locations distributed across tundra and birch forest streams. Algal accumulation on tiles was then measured over 7 weeks using a fluorometer (Bentothorch) together with a number of likely controlling factors (light, temperature, dissolved nutrients and depth). I observed a significant difference in algal accumulation between the stream types (p<0.05), with nearly three times greater biomass in birch forest compared to tundra streams. However, these differences were not related to variation in light and water temperature. Dissolved nitrogen had a significant correlation with algal accumulation although with a lot of unexplained variation. Unmeasured hydrological aspects such as stream flow may have had large significance for differences in algal growth between the higher-gradient tundra and lower-gradient birch forest streams.  Overall, I hypothesize that the productivity of these systems is limited by nitrogen or several parameters working together and/or that these systems are affected by an unmeasured parameter (e.g., grazing, hydrological disturbance). While my results did not clearly establish the factors regulating algal growth in these streams it suggests that dissolved nitrogen is an important factor. The observed differences between stream types suggest that the productivity of arctic streams and the potential effect of climate change may be affected by small-scale variation in geomorphology and hydrology.  

  • Landin Larsson, Ingela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Intensivträning i avkodning: En interventionsstudie i åk 22017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the effects of a reading intervention using part of “Läsinlärning i 7 steg” and the computer game “Lukimat Spel Ett-Läsning” for phonemic and decoding training. Its focus was to investigate the effects on phonological awareness, letter-sound connection and decoding. Ten children in grade 2 with limited decoding ability were selected based on screening test results and were divided into two comparable groups. The intervention group received daily one-to-one-tutorial phonemic and decoding training, 20-30 minutes each time for 20 occasions.  The control group received their usual classroom-based training. Pre- and post-test examined whether the intervention had affected the intervention students' decoding compared to the control students’. The results showed that both groups increased their letter-sound connection and decoding performance. The intervention group performed better at decoding and in reading speed and accuracy, compared to the control group.  In student interviews, it was explored how the students experienced the intervention and how they felt that the training affected their ability to read. The results showed that students experienced the activities mostly as meaningful and fun and that they all think they have learned things that have been positive for their ability to read. The result shows that an intervention of this type with phonemic training increases decoding ability, and can be important for reading development. 

  • Carlsson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Interconnecting: Rethinking Student Housing Intertwined with Public Functions2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Hägglund, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    A Product of Norrland2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Wallin, Rebecca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Space for Farewell2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Theophoanous, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Towards an Experimental Monumentality: Traversing in Norrland's Woods2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Tengstrand, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    A Place Like Home2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Svensson, Jessie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Crafted Care2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Samuelsson, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Connectivity: City Center of Karlskrona and its Closest Districts2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Rutkauskaite, Egle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Urban Solitude: A Journey through a Geo-Poetic Archipelago of Umeå2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Rouwet, Rogier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    A Hut for a Stranger2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Onopchenko, Alla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Living Heritage: Reinveting Farming Culture in Umeå2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Olsson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Supportive Architecture: Spaces for Coping and Recovering2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Nero, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Sustainable Way of Urban Life2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Lundmark, Alexander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Walking in the Contemporary City: Thames Explorer Club2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Lundberg, Måns
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Backyard Aesthetics: Towards an Etical Urbanism2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Karlsson, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Green Not Blue: Building for Recovery2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Jonsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Low Emission Living2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Jonsson, Nathalie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Monumental Mnemonics: The Acceptance of Antagonistic Change2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Johansson, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Patienthotell: Platsens förutsättningar – det medicinska sjukvårdssystemet i norr och dess effekt på människor och platser2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Härdh, Amanda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Together: Rethinking Integration and Housing of Unaccompanied Minor Refugees2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Grundström, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    The Sustainability Equation2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Gipas, Mantas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Desanctified Umeå: The Role of Sacred Space in Contemporary Society2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Fischl, Geza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Biophilic Living: A Behavior Responsive Architecture2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Eriksson-Lindberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Integration by Proxy: Place as an Intermediate for Traversing Social Borders2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Boström, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Rethinking Schools2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Erlaskog, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    The Railway Alternative: A Strategy to Enable Inland Communities to Distribute and Acquire Needed Services2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Barbuta, Diana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Voluntary Prisoners of Digital Technologies2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Eleftheriadou, Ioulia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Intra-Adventure: Choreographing Arctic Landscapes2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Cozic, Gaelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    A Common Tomorrow: Kajulu Rescue Center2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Kärner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Energioptimering vid Kvarnsvedens pappersbruk2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The paper industry is a highly energy consuming process which also facing huge challenges as the global demand of paper products constantly decreasing. Therefore, the importance of energy optimizing the process becomes more and more crucial. The purpose of this work was to contribute to the energy optimization work at Kvarnsveden paper mill in Borlänge by mapping the energy consumption and analyzing particular areas with potential of optimization. Furthermore, analysis of the process parameters tinting colors, moisture profile and the pulp refiners in order to decrease the material losses were performed.

    The results from the analysis of tinting colors and moisture profiles provided the operators with reference intervals which stated how to run the parameters in order to produce paper of approved quality. The purpose of analyzing the refiners was to investigate if the quality of the mass could be predicted by specific energy instead of Freeness and average fiber length, which is the method used today. The result of this analysis shows that this is not possible today. However, specific energy is a valuable parameter in order to predict process malfunctions.

    The result of the energy mapping shows that the total specific energy consumption to produce one ton paper is 4,1 MWh/ton. Furthermore the energy mapping shows that every ton of paper that doesn’t clear the quality control and has to be re-produced consumes additional 1,3 MWh/ton of energy, which means that the total amount of energy for reproduced paper is 5,4 MWh. The amount of energy that is necessary to re-produce shows the importance of producing quality approved paper the first time, and since PM12 is capable of producing 1 ton/min at normal operating speed, the amount of paper that has to be re-produced can increase very fast. Hopefully, the results from the analysis of tinting colors and moisture profile will contribute to a decreased amount of papers that has to be re-produced.

    Furthermore the energy mapping shows some areas with energy optimization potential. Partly by maintenance and repairs of heat exchangers and steam condensers and partly by terminate the heating of buildings that has no use in the production today. 

  • Cañadas Fernandez, Manuel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Monitoring mercury in an urban environment, Umeå, Sweden: Representability and variability of mercury using forest moss biomonitoring in an urban environment2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of my project was to determine variability and representability of mercury in the urban environment of Umeå in northern Sweden, based on applying the methods of forest moss biomonitoring (Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, ICP Manual). Mercury (Hg) is a commune pollutant in urban environments release to the atmosphere by anthropogenic activities. Industrial, traffic and incineration activities are the main sources of this element. Mercury is easily transported through the atmosphere and cycle through terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, trending to bioaccumulate in organisms. The aims of the study are: (1) determine the representability and variability of the method in a specific urban environment, based on more intensive analyses of a green area within the city boundaries of Umeå, northern Sweden. (2) influence of site-specific conditions on the concentration of mercury in mosses. (3) City-scale variability in relation to national forest moss biomonitoring data (IVL.se). Results of urban environment measurements do not differ much respect the values of mercury concentration obtained sampling mosses far from the city, but it is subject to many factors that can alter results of the study.  Most of these are meteorological factors and the difficulty of find green zones close to cities with the suitable conditions to find mosses and perform a property sampling process avoiding throughfall and litterfall. The conclusion is that the use of mosses is a representative and valuable method to obtaining information in an urban environment but is limited by mentioned factors.