Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Svensson, Michael B., Med Dr, docentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4972-4416
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Svensson, M. B., Lovric, A., Åkerfeldt, T., Hellsten, D., Haas, T., Gustafsson, T. & Rullman, E. (2024). Discordant gene expression in subcutaneous adipose and skeletal muscle tissues in response to exercise training. Physiological Reports, 12(7), Article ID e15995.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discordant gene expression in subcutaneous adipose and skeletal muscle tissues in response to exercise training
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Physiological Reports, E-ISSN 2051-817X, Vol. 12, no 7, article id e15995Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exercise has different effects on different tissues in the body, the sum of which may determine the response to exercise and the health benefits. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether physical training regulates transcriptional network communites common to both skeletal muscle (SM) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Eight such shared transcriptional communities were found in both tissues. Eighteen young overweight adults voluntarily participated in 7 weeks of combined strength and endurance training (five training sessions per week). Biopsies were taken from SM and SAT before and after training. Five of the network communities were regulated by training in SM but showed no change in SAT. One community involved in insulin- AMPK signaling and glucose utilization was upregulated in SM but downregulated in SAT. This diverging exercise regulation was confirmed in two independent studies and was also associated with BMI and diabetes in an independent cohort. Thus, the current finding is consistent with the differential responses of different tissues and suggests that body composition may influence the observed individual whole-body metabolic response to exercise training and help explain the observed attenuated whole-body insulin sensitivity after exercise training, even if it has significant effects on the exercising muscle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
adipose tissue, GTEx, mRNA-sequencing, obesity, skeletal muscle
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Physiology
Research subject
molecular cell biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223435 (URN)10.14814/phy2.15995 (DOI)001194508100001 ()38561245 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85189566155 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20220725
Available from: 2024-04-16 Created: 2024-04-16 Last updated: 2024-04-16Bibliographically approved
Chorell, E., Otten, J., Stomby, A., Ryberg, M., Waling, M., Hauksson, J., . . . Olsson, T. (2021). Improved peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity after lifestyle interventions in type 2 diabetes is associated with specific metabolomic and lipidomic signatures in skeletal muscle and plasma. Metabolites, 11(12), Article ID 834.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity after lifestyle interventions in type 2 diabetes is associated with specific metabolomic and lipidomic signatures in skeletal muscle and plasma
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Metabolites, ISSN 2218-1989, E-ISSN 2218-1989, Vol. 11, no 12, article id 834Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lifestyle interventions with weight loss can improve insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes (T2D), but mechanisms are unclear. We explored circulating and skeletal muscle metabolite signatures of altered peripheral (pIS) and hepatic insulin sensitivity (hIS) in overweight and obese T2D individuals that were randomly assigned a 12-week Paleolithic-type diet with (diet-ex, n = 13) or without (diet, n = 13) supervised exercise. Baseline and post-intervention measures included: mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and lipidomics of skeletal muscle and plasma; pIS and hIS; ectopic lipid deposits in the liver and skeletal muscle; and skeletal muscle fat oxidation rate. Both groups lowered BMI and total % fat mass and increased their pIS. Only the diet-group improved hIS and reduced ectopic lipids in the liver and muscle. The combined improvement in pIS and hIS in the diet-group were associated with decreases in muscle and circulating branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolites, specifically valine. Improved pIS with diet-ex was instead linked to increased diacylglycerol (34:2) and triacylglycerol (56:0) and decreased phosphatidylcholine (34:3) in muscle coupled with improved muscle fat oxidation rate. This suggests a tissue crosstalk involving BCAA-metabolites after diet intervention with improved pIS and hIS, reflecting reduced lipid influx. Increased skeletal muscle lipid utilization with exercise may prevent specific lipid accumulation at sites that perturb insulin signaling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), Diacylglycerol (DAG), Diet, Ectopic fat, Exercise training, Hepatic insulin sensitivity (hIS), Peripheral insulin sensitivity (pIS), Skeletal muscle, Type 2 diabetes
National Category
Physiology Nutrition and Dietetics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190949 (URN)10.3390/metabo11120834 (DOI)000735530300001 ()34940592 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85121572914 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kempe Foundations, JCK-1725Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20150553
Available from: 2022-01-05 Created: 2022-01-05 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Jakobsson, J., Cotgreave, I., Furberg, M., Arnberg, N. & Svensson, M. B. (2021). Potential physiological and cellular mechanisms of exercise that decrease the risk of severe complications and mortality following sars-cov-2 infection. Sports, 9(9), Article ID 121.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential physiological and cellular mechanisms of exercise that decrease the risk of severe complications and mortality following sars-cov-2 infection
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Sports, E-ISSN 2075-4663, Vol. 9, no 9, article id 121Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has unmasked mankind's vulnerability to biological threats. Although higher age is a major risk factor for disease severity in COVID-19, several predisposing risk factors for mortality are related to low cardiorespiratory and metabolic fitness, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Reaching physical activity (PA) guideline goals contribute to protect against numerous immune and inflammatory disorders, in addition to multi-morbidities and mortality. Elevated levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, being non-obese, and regular PA improves immunological function, mitigating sustained low-grade systemic inflammation and age-related deterioration of the immune system, or immunosenescence. Regular PA and being non-obese also improve the antibody response to vaccination. In this review, we highlight potential physiological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms that are affected by regular PA, increase the host antiviral defense, and may determine the course and outcome of COVID-19. Not only are the immune system and regular PA in relation to COVID-19 discussed, but also the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and hormonal systems, as well as skeletal muscle, epigenetics, and mitochondrial function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
COVID-19, Exercise, Health, Immunology, Obesity, Physical activity, SARS-CoV-2, Virus
National Category
Immunology in the medical area Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187696 (URN)10.3390/sports9090121 (DOI)000702059300001 ()2-s2.0-85114293725 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-09-23 Created: 2021-09-23 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Otten, J., Stomby, A., Waling, M., Chorell, E., Ryberg, M., Svensson, M. B., . . . Olsson, T. (2021). The liver-alpha-cell axis after a mixed meal and during weight loss in type 2 diabetes. Endocrine Connections, 10(9), 1101-1110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The liver-alpha-cell axis after a mixed meal and during weight loss in type 2 diabetes
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Endocrine Connections, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 1101-1110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Glucagon and amino acids may be regulated in a feedback loop called the liver-alpha-cell axis with alanine or glutamine as suggested signal molecules. We assessed this concept in individuals with type 2 diabetes in the fasting state, after ingestion of a protein-rich meal, and during weight loss. Moreover, we investigated if postprandial glucagon secretion and hepatic insulin sensitivity were related.

Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a 12-week weight-loss trial (Paleolithic diet ± exercise) in 29 individuals with type 2 diabetes. Before and after the intervention, plasma glucagon and amino acids were measured in the fasting state and during 180 min after a protein-rich mixed meal. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was measured using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with [6,6-2H2]glucose as a tracer.

Results: The postprandial increase of plasma glucagon was associated with the postprandial increase of alanine and several other amino acids but not glutamine. In the fasted state and after the meal, glucagon levels were negatively correlated with hepatic insulin sensitivity (rS = −0.51/r = −0.58, respectively; both P < 0.05). Improved hepatic insulin sensitivity with weight loss was correlated with decreased postprandial glucagon response (r = −0.78; P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Several amino acids, notably alanine, but not glutamine could be key signals to the alpha cell to increase glucagon secretion. Amino acids may be part of a feedback mechanism as glucagon increases endogenous glucose production and ureagenesis in the liver. Moreover, postprandial glucagon secretion seems to be tightly related to hepatic insulin sensitivity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bioscientifica, 2021
Keywords
Amino acids, Glucagon, Hepatic insulin sensitivity, Mixed meal, Type 2 diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188157 (URN)10.1530/EC-21-0171 (DOI)000704561100017 ()2-s2.0-85115733491 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-07 Created: 2021-10-07 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sjödin, A., Hellström, F., Sehlstedt, E., Svensson, M. B. & Burén, J. (2020). Effects of a Ketogenic Diet on Muscle Fatigue in Healthy, Young, Normal-Weight Women: A Randomized Controlled Feeding Trial. Nutrients, 12(4), Article ID 955.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a Ketogenic Diet on Muscle Fatigue in Healthy, Young, Normal-Weight Women: A Randomized Controlled Feeding Trial
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 12, no 4, article id 955Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ketogenic low-carbohydrate high-fat (LCHF) diets are increasingly popular in broad sections of the population. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a non-energy-restricted ketogenic LCHF diet on muscle fatigue in healthy, young, and normal-weight women. Twenty-four women were randomly allocated to a 4-week ketogenic LCHF diet followed by a 4-week control diet (a National Food Agency recommended diet), or the reverse sequence due to the crossover design. Treatment periods were separated by a 15 week washout period. Seventeen women completed the study and were included in the analyses. Treatment effects were evaluated using mixed models. The ketogenic LCHF diet had no effect on grip strength or time to fatigue, measured with handgrip test (day 24–26). However, cycling time to fatigue decreased with almost two minutes (−1.85 min 95% CI:[−2.30;−1.40]; p < 0.001) during incremental cycling (day 25–27), accommodated with higher ratings of perceived exertion using the Borg scale (p < 0.01). Participants’ own diary notes revealed experiences of muscle fatigue during daily life activities, as well as during exercise. We conclude that in young and healthy women, a ketogenic LCHF diet has an unfavorable effect on muscle fatigue and might affect perceived exertion during daily life activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
sports nutrition, fat adaptation, saturated fat, diet intervention, female, food, nutrition, low carbohydrate diet (LCD)
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-171061 (URN)10.3390/nu12040955 (DOI)000531831300075 ()32235518 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85082733010 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-05-25 Created: 2020-05-25 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Jakobsson, J., Malm, C., Furberg, M., Ekelund, U. & Svensson, M. B. (2020). Physical Activity During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic: Prevention of a Decline in Metabolic and Immunological Functions. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, 2, Article ID 57.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Activity During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic: Prevention of a Decline in Metabolic and Immunological Functions
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 2, article id 57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2020
Keywords
COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, coronavirus, health, mortality, physical activity, sedentary behavior
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Infectious Medicine
Research subject
Sports Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190478 (URN)10.3389/fspor.2020.00057 (DOI)33345048 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-12-16 Created: 2021-12-16 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Axling, U., Önning, G., Combs, M. A., Bogale, A., Högström, M. & Svensson, M. B. (2020). The Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum299v on Iron Status and Physical Performance in Female Iron-Deficient Athletes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients, 12(5), Article ID 1279.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum299v on Iron Status and Physical Performance in Female Iron-Deficient Athletes: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 12, no 5, article id 1279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Iron is an essential micronutrient for oxygen transport and mitochondrial metabolism and is critical for physical performance. Compromised iron stores are more commonly found among athletes, and females are especially at risk. Iron deficiency is generally treated using oral iron supplements. However, only a small proportion of ingested iron is absorbed, necessitating higher intakes, which may result in adverse side effects, reduced compliance, and inefficient repletion of iron stores. The probiotic strainLactobacillus plantarum299v (Lp299v) significantly increases intestinal iron absorption in meal studies. The present study was conducted to explore the effects of 20 mg of iron with or without Lp299v on iron status, mood state, and physical performance. Fifty-three healthy non-anemic female athletes with low iron stores (ferritin < 30 mu g/L) were randomized, and 39 completed the study. Intake of Lp299v with iron for four weeks increased ferritin levels more than iron alone (13.6 vs. 8.2 mu g/L), but the difference between the groups was not significant (p= 0.056). The mean reticulocyte hemoglobin content increased after intake of Lp299v compared to control (1.5 vs. 0.82 pg) after 12 weeks, but the difference between the group was not significant (p= 0.083). The Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire showed increased vigor with Lp299v vs. iron alone after 12 weeks (3.5 vs. 0.1,p= 0.015). No conclusive effects on physical performance were observed. In conclusion, Lp299v, together with 20 mg of iron, could result in a more substantial and rapid improvement in iron status and improved vigor compared to 20 mg of iron alone. A larger clinical trial is needed to further explore these findings as well as the impact of Lp299v on physical performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
Lactobacillus plantarum299v, DSM 9843, probiotics, athletes, iron-deficiency, physical performance, exercise, ferritin, vigor
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173635 (URN)10.3390/nu12051279 (DOI)000542272700126 ()32365981 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85084141292 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-07-21 Created: 2020-07-21 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Otten, J., Andersson, J., Ståhl, J., Stomby, A., Saleh, A., Waling, M., . . . Olsson, T. (2019). Exercise Training Adds Cardiometabolic Benefits of a Paleolithic Diet in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, 8(2), Article ID e010634.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise Training Adds Cardiometabolic Benefits of a Paleolithic Diet in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e010634Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The accumulation of myocardial triglycerides and remodeling of the left ventricle are common features in type 2 diabetes mellitus and represent potential risk factors for the development of diastolic and systolic dysfunction. A few studies have investigated the separate effects of diet and exercise training on cardiac function, but none have investigated myocardial changes in response to a combined diet and exercise intervention. This 12-week randomized study assessed the effects of a Paleolithic diet, with and without additional supervised exercise training, on cardiac fat, structure, and function.

Methods and Results: Twenty-two overweight and obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomized to either a Paleolithic diet and standard-care exercise recommendations ( PD ) or to a Paleolithic diet plus supervised exercise training 3 hours per week ( PD - EX ). This study includes secondary end points related to cardiac structure and function, ie, myocardial triglycerides levels, cardiac morphology, and strain were measured using cardiovascular magnetic resonance, including proton spectroscopy, at baseline and after 12 weeks. Both groups showed major favorable metabolic changes. The PD - EX group showed significant decreases in myocardial triglycerides levels (-45%, P=0.038) and left ventricle mass to end-diastolic volume ratio (-13%, P=0.008) while the left ventricle end-diastolic volume and stroke volume increased significantly (+14%, P=0.004 and +17%, P=0.008, respectively). These variables were unchanged in the PD group.

Conclusions: Exercise training plus a Paleolithic diet reduced myocardial triglycerides levels and improved left ventricle remodeling in overweight/obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Clinical Trial Registration URL : http://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT 01513798.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, diet, exercise, myocardial metabolism, type 2 diabetes mellitus
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157046 (URN)10.1161/JAHA.118.010634 (DOI)000460105800010 ()30652528 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060171480 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Otten, J., Stomby, A., Waling, M., Isaksson, A., Söderström, I., Ryberg, M., . . . Olsson, T. (2018). A heterogeneous response of liver and skeletal muscle fat to the combination of a Paleolithic diet and exercise in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled trial. Diabetologia, 61(7), 1548-1559
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A heterogeneous response of liver and skeletal muscle fat to the combination of a Paleolithic diet and exercise in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled trial
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 61, no 7, p. 1548-1559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims/hypothesis: The aim of the study was to investigate ectopic fat deposition and insulin sensitivity, in a parallel single-blinded randomised controlled trial, comparing Paleolithic diet alone with the combination of Paleolithic diet and exercise in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Thirty-two individuals with type 2 diabetes with BMI 25-40 kg/m(2) and 30-70 years of age followed a Paleolithic diet ad libitum for 12 weeks. In addition, study participants were randomised by computer program to either supervised combined exercise training (PD-EX group) or standard care exercise recommendations (PD group). Staff performing examinations and assessing outcomes were blinded to group assignment. Thirteen participants were analysed in each group: hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were measured using the hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp technique combined with [6,6-H-2(2)]glucose infusion, and liver fat was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy; both analyses were secondary endpoints. Intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content was measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a secondary analysis. All examinations were performed at Umca University Hospital, Umca, Sweden. Results: Both study groups showed a median body weight loss of 7 kg. Fat mass decreased by 5.7 kg in the PD group and by 6.5 kg in the PD-EX group. Maximum oxygen uptake increased in the PD-EX group only. Liver fat showed a consistent reduction (74% decrease) in the PD group, while the response in the PD-EX group was heterogeneous (p < 0.05 for the difference between groups). IMCL content of the soleus muscle decreased by 40% in the PD group and by 22% in the PD-EX group (p < 0.05 for the difference between groups). Both groups improved their peripheral and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity, but not their hepatic insulin sensitivity. Plasma fetuin-A decreased by 11% in the PD group (p < 0.05) and remained unchanged in the PD-EX group. Liver fat changes during the intervention were correlated with changes in fetuin-A (r(S) = 0.63, p < 0.01). Participants did not report any important adverse events caused by the intervention. Conclusions/interpretation: A Paleolithic diet reduced liver fat and IMCL content, while there was a tissue-specific heterogeneous response to added exercise training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Exercise, Hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp, Insulin sensitivity, Intramyocellular fat, Liver fat, Nutrition, Obesity, Paleolithic diet, Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Weight loss
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150764 (URN)10.1007/s00125-018-4618-y (DOI)000434250500007 ()29696296 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046029986 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Otten, J., Stomby, A., Waling, M., Isaksson, A., Tellström, A., Lundin-Olsson, L., . . . Olsson, T. (2017). Benefits of a Paleolithic diet with and without supervised exercise on fat mass, insulin sensitivity, and glycemic control: a randomized controlled trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, 33(1), Article ID e2828.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Benefits of a Paleolithic diet with and without supervised exercise on fat mass, insulin sensitivity, and glycemic control: a randomized controlled trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 33, no 1, article id e2828Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Means to reduce future risk for cardiovascular disease in subjects with type 2 diabetes are urgently needed.

Methods

Thirty-two patients with type 2 diabetes (age 59 ± 8 years) followed a Paleolithic diet for 12 weeks. Participants were randomized to either standard care exercise recommendations (PD) or 1-h supervised exercise sessions (aerobic exercise and resistance training) three times per week (PD-EX).

Results

For the within group analyses, fat mass decreased by 5.7 kg (IQR: −6.6, −4.1; p < 0.001) in the PD group and by 6.7 kg (−8.2, −5.3; p < 0.001) in the PD-EX group. Insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) improved by 45% in the PD (p < 0.001) and PD-EX (p < 0.001) groups. HbA1c decreased by 0.9% (−1.2, −0.6; p < 0.001) in the PD group and 1.1% (−1.7, −0.7; p < 0.01) in the PD-EX group. Leptin decreased by 62% (p < 0.001) in the PD group and 42% (p < 0.001) in the PD-EX group. Maximum oxygen uptake increased by 0.2 L/min (0.0, 0.3) in the PD-EX group, and remained unchanged in the PD group (p < 0.01 for the difference between intervention groups). Male participants decreased lean mass by 2.6 kg (−3.6, −1.3) in the PD group and by 1.2 kg (−1.3, 1.0) in the PD-EX group (p < 0.05 for the difference between intervention groups).

Conclusions

A Paleolithic diet improves fat mass and metabolic balance including insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and leptin in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Supervised exercise training may not enhance the effects on these outcomes, but preserves lean mass in men and increases cardiovascular fitness.

Keywords
type 2 diabetes, Paleolithic diet, diet intervention, exercise, glycosyl-ated haemoglobin A, insulin sensitivity, leptin
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126188 (URN)10.1002/dmrr.2828 (DOI)000397102800010 ()2-s2.0-84976866496 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4972-4416

Search in DiVA

Show all publications