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Lönngren, J., Bellocchi, A., Berge, M., Bøgelund, P., Direito, I., Huff, J. L., . . . Tormey, R. (2024). Emotions in engineering education: a configurative meta-synthesis systematic review. Journal of Engineering Education
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Emotions in engineering education: a configurative meta-synthesis systematic review
Vise andre…
2024 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 1069-4730, E-ISSN 1524-4873Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: The study of emotions in engineering education (EEE) has increased in recent years, but this emerging, multidisciplinary body of research is dispersed and not well consolidated. This paper reports on the first systematic review of EEE research and scholarship. Purpose: The review aimed to critically assess how researchers and scholars in engineering education have conceptualized emotions and how those conceptualizations have been used to frame and conduct EEE research and scholarship.

Scope/Method: The systematic review followed the procedures of a configurative meta-synthesis, mapping emotion theories and concepts, research purposes and methods, and citation patterns in the EEE literature. The review proceeded through five stages: (i) scoping and database searching; (ii) abstract screening, full text sifting, and full text review; (iii) pearling; (iv) scoping review, and (v) in-depth analysis for the meta-synthesis review. Two hundred and thirteen publications were included in the final analysis.

Results: The results show that the EEE literature has not extensively engaged with the wide range of conceptualizations of emotion available in the educational, psychological, and sociological literature. Further, the focus on emotion often seems to have been unintentional and of secondary importance in studies whose primary goals were to study other phenomena.

Conclusions: More research adopting intentional, theorized approaches to emotions will be crucial in further developing the field. To do justice to complex emotional phenomena in teaching and learning, future EEE research will also need to engage a broader range of conceptualizations of emotion and research methods, drawing on diverse disciplinary traditions.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Emneord
configurative review, emotion, emotional intelligence, engineering education, meta-synthesis, systematic review
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-224916 (URN)10.1002/jee.20600 (DOI)001222736900001 ()2-s2.0-85192948887 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Umeå University, FS2.1.6-1795-19Umeå University, FS 1.1-1294-15Swedish Research Council, 2020-0390
Tilgjengelig fra: 2024-05-27 Laget: 2024-05-27 Sist oppdatert: 2024-05-27
Ottemo, A., Berge, M., Mendick, H. & Silfver, E. (2024). Geek nostalgia: the reflective and restorative defence of white male geek culture. New Media and Society
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Geek nostalgia: the reflective and restorative defence of white male geek culture
2024 (engelsk)Inngår i: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

During recent decades, geek culture has become increasingly visible, and the geek has left the cultural margins, becoming more popular than ever. At the same time, nostalgia has emerged as a central component of geek culture. Framed by a post-structural understanding of gender and race and drawing on cultural theorist Svetlana Boym’s distinction between reflective and restorative nostalgia, this article explores how and why geeks nostalgically long for a time when they were largely marginalized. We combine readings of Swedish online geek podcasts and YouTube channels with ethnographic visits to geek conferences and pop-cultural “geek fairs,” such as Comic Con and SciFiWorld. We argue that geek nostalgia represents a clinging on to a “constitutive wound,” allowing the geek figure to mobilize masculine victimhood in ways that simultaneously underpin geek privilege and allow the geek to continue operating as a white male gatekeeper of geek culture.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Sage Publications, 2024
Emneord
Geek culture, gender, masculinity, nostalgia, race
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221477 (URN)10.1177/14614448241232067 (DOI)2-s2.0-85185910257 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2018-03401
Tilgjengelig fra: 2024-02-25 Laget: 2024-02-25 Sist oppdatert: 2024-03-06
Mendick, H., Ottemo, A., Berge, M. & Silfver, E. (2023). Geek entrepreneurs: the social network, Iron Man and the reconfiguration of hegemonic masculinity. Journal of Gender Studies, 32(3), 283-295
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Geek entrepreneurs: the social network, Iron Man and the reconfiguration of hegemonic masculinity
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 32, nr 3, s. 283-295Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we argue that the geek entrepreneur is a new hegemonic masculine formation superseding the macho formation exemplified by John Wayne and the global business masculinity proposed as hegemonic by Connell and Messerschmidt more recently. This formation fuses the technological genius and suffering of geekiness with the disruption and innovation of entrepreneurialism. It is the masculinity of the geek entrepreneur that today legitimates both male domination and capitalism. We construct this argument through looking in detail at two cinematic representations of the geek entrepreneur: Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network and Tony Stark in Iron Man. We hope to open up a debate about how gendered discursive formations have changed since the 1980s, what masculinity is now hegemonic, and how this can illuminate gender and other power relations.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Routledge, 2023
Emneord
entrepreneur, geek, hegemonic masculinity, Iron Man, Mark Zuckerberg
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188019 (URN)10.1080/09589236.2021.1981836 (DOI)000702243100001 ()2-s2.0-85116120923 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2018-03401
Tilgjengelig fra: 2021-09-30 Laget: 2021-09-30 Sist oppdatert: 2023-09-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Ottemo, A., Berge, M., Mendick, H. & Silfver, E. (2023). Gender, passion, and 'sticky' technology in a voluntaristically-organized technology makerspace. Engineering Studies, 15(2), 101-121
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Gender, passion, and 'sticky' technology in a voluntaristically-organized technology makerspace
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: Engineering Studies, ISSN 1937-8629, E-ISSN 1940-8374, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 101-121Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

As 'open' and supposedly inclusive informal learning settings that participants visit out of interest and passion, there has been hope that makerspaces will democratize technology and challenge traditional gender patterns in engineering education. Passion for technology has, however, also been shown to be deeply intertwined with the masculinization of engineering. This article explores how this tension manifests among engineering students and other makers at an 'open' voluntaristically-organized technology makerspace located at the campus of a Swedish university of technology. It draws on a post-structural understanding of gender and Sara Ahmed’s queer phenomenological conceptualization of emotions as 'orienting devices'. Based on ethnographic fieldwork and interviews with makers, we show how passion for technology is articulated as a particularly absorbing emotion that underpins a playful approach to technology and a framing of makers as single-minded and asocial. We demonstrate how passion for technology thereby becomes a homosocial 'glue' that makes technology 'sticky' for only a select group of techno-passionate men. We conclude that this undermines the potential for 'making' to democratize technology and puts into question the degree to which interest-driven, voluntaristic and 'authentic' settings for engaging with technology can contribute to pluralizing engineering.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Routledge, 2023
Emneord
Gender, technology, makerspaces, engineering, passion, ‘stickiness’
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-207034 (URN)10.1080/19378629.2023.2203396 (DOI)000972906200001 ()2-s2.0-85153481255 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2018-03401
Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-04-25 Laget: 2023-04-25 Sist oppdatert: 2023-09-04bibliografisk kontrollert
Berge, M. & Lönngren, J. (2023). I skämten döljs framtidens ingenjör. In: : . Paper presented at FemHum symposium: Humor på allvar, Online, 4-5 december, 2023.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>I skämten döljs framtidens ingenjör
2023 (svensk)Konferansepaper, Oral presentation only (Annet vitenskapelig)
Emneord
Humor
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-217483 (URN)
Konferanse
FemHum symposium: Humor på allvar, Online, 4-5 december, 2023
Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-12-05 Laget: 2023-12-05 Sist oppdatert: 2023-12-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Lönngren, J., Berge, M. & Holmén, J. (2023). Learning for an unknown future: emotional positioning in and for expansive learning. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2023, European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, UK, August 22-25, 2023.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Learning for an unknown future: emotional positioning in and for expansive learning
2023 (engelsk)Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

STUDY OVERVIEW AND PURPOSE: We live in troubled times. Faced with increasingly serious and urgent, wicked sustainability challenges (Lönngren & van Poeck, 2021; United Nations, 2015), such as climate change, pandemics, and violent conflict , more and more people experience anxiety, hopelessness, and worries about the future (Barrineau et al., 2022; Ojala et al., 2021; Pihkala, 2020). The United Nations’ Agenda 2030 with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs; United Nations, 2015) may offer a comforting illusion of a yellow brick road to a known and livable future. Yet, complex systems studies have shown that the future is not only unknown but ultimately unknowable (Dewulf & Biesbroek, 2018; Funtowicz & Ravetz, 1993). In light of such radical uncertainty, Barrineau et al. (2022) argued that environmental and sustainability education (ESE) is not only about “promoting [pre-defined] skills and competencies in sustainability education with which to equip students to tackle sustainability challenges” (p.3) since we do not know yet what competencies they will need. The only thing we know for certain is that future generations will need to develop knowledge, skills, and practices that are different from those we know today, that is, those that have given rise to our current predicaments. In other words, students need to “learn something that is not yet there” (Engeström & Sannino, 2010, p. 2).

In recent years, a range of educational theories and concepts that touch upon this type of learning have increased in popularity. For example, Engeström et al. (Engeström et al., 2022; Engeström & Sannino, 2010) have drawn on cultural historical activity theory to examine expansive learningprocesses that allow learners to develop “expanded pattern[s] of activity, corresponding theoretical concept[s], and new types of agency” (Engeström & Sannino, 2010, p. 7). Similarly, Barrineau et al. (2022) have described emergentist education as a form of teaching and learning that engages with “the possibilities of the not-yet-imagined” (p.2). Others have described related theories, such as transformative and transgressive social learning as crucially important in ESE (Lotz-Sisitka et al., 2015).

These and other traditions of transformative and expansive learning theories have in common that they attend to the role of social interaction for learning, stressing that learning always takes place in social contexts (Lenglet, 2022; Lotz-Sisitka et al., 2015; Van Poeck et al., 2020). Another common thread through many approaches is an attention to spirituality, affect, and/or emotions (Hoggan, 2016; Lenglet, 2022; Lotz-Sisitka et al., 2015). For example, Hoggan (2016) argued that learners must be “emotionally capable of change” (p. 61), pay attention to emotional experiences, and learn to utilize emotional ways of knowing. Similarly, Östman et al. (2019) have used pragmatist theories to argue that strong embodied experiences can trigger transformative learning. This intersection between expansive learning, social interaction, and emotions is the focus of our contribution.

The aim of our study is to explore how expansive learning can manifest in and through emotional interaction when student groups engage with wicked sustainability challenges. To do so, we draw on positioning theory as a theoretical tool that allows us to study emotions as a form of social interaction (Harré & van Langenhove, 1999) rather than something individuals have and experience. More specifically, we explore processes of emotional positioning (Lönngren et al., 2021; Lönngren & Berge, forthcoming), analyzing how students use emotions discursively to position themselves – and each other – in relation to their (expansive) learning and (future) agency to work for sustainable and desired futures.

METHODS: Emotions can be expressed through a wide range of modalities (e.g., speech, gestures, facial expressions, intonation, bodily positions). Therefore, multimodal approaches are particularly suitable for studying how emotions are expressed and used in social interaction (Goodwin et al., 2012; Hufnagel & Kelly, 2018; Lönngren & Berge, forthcoming). For this study, we video-recorded group work conducted by four groups of engineering students. The group work sessions took place during two sustainability courses for engineering students at two Swedish universities and they were part of the students’ regular course work. No researchers were present during the sessions, but teachers entered each room occasionally to check on the groups’ progress. In total, we recorded approximately 70 hours of video data. To analyze the data, we first watched all recordings (~70h) to familiarize ourselves with the data. Thereafter, we formulated sensitizing concepts (consensus/dissensus, convergence/divergence, comfort/vulnerability, intensity, and social positions) to narrow our focus on situations in which we could study emotional positioning and/or expansive learning processes. The sensitizing concepts allowed us to select a smaller number of excerpts for in-depth analysis. For each excerpt, we then developed narrative descriptions of any processes of expansivity and expansive learning we could observe. Finally, we applied the analytic tools of positioning theory to make sense of the ways in which students used emotions discursively while engaging (or not) in expansive learning.

PRELIMINARY FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary findings point to multiple ways in which emotional positioning could facilitate expansive learning during group engagement with wicked challenges. For example, when students suggested norm-breaking methods or solution approaches, other students could validate those ideas by listening attentively and expressing excitement. By validating unconventional ideas, the students also positioned themselves and each other as expansive learners with rights and duties to reach beyond known approaches and solutions. In other excerpts, we observed high levels of emotional congruence between the group members. When one student laughed, others would often join in. In other instances, students would fall silent simultaneously, much like a general pause in an orchestra concert. By enacting these and other forms of emotional congruence, the students could co-construct their group as a team – working together, building on each other’s ideas, and taking collective responsibility for any outcomes they produced. Thus, they also constructed a shared safety-net, reducing perceived risks associated with expansive learning: If the outcomes of their work had turned out to be flawed or ridiculed by others, they could have shared the burden of the perceived (!) failure and helped each other focus on the exceptional learning they had achieved. These findings demonstrate how students could use emotions discursively to position themselves and each other as (a) students who can and should engage in expansive learning, and (b) sustainability agents who can and should contribute to developing innovative solutions to wicked issues. The findings also show how emotions expressed in interaction can have profound impacts on learning, which further stresses the importance of more ESE research on emotions in and as social interaction. A better understanding of emotional interaction in ESE would also support educators in developing teaching and learning environments conducive to expansive learning.

Emneord
emotional positioning, engineering education, expansive learning
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218340 (URN)
Konferanse
ECER 2023, European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, UK, August 22-25, 2023
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council
Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-12-19 Laget: 2023-12-19 Sist oppdatert: 2023-12-19bibliografisk kontrollert
Danielsson, A., Berge, M., Österling, L., Leticia, B., Truong, N. & Valero, P. (2023). Walking ethnographies in higher education spaces of physics. In: ECER 2023: Programme. Paper presented at ECER 2023, Glasgow, UK, August 21-22, 2023. EERA
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Walking ethnographies in higher education spaces of physics
Vise andre…
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: ECER 2023: Programme, EERA , 2023Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

This presentation draws on the methodological pilot from a new research project focused on in/exclusion in higher education physics and mathematics (PI: last author), illustrating the reciprocal process of theoretical and methodological fine-tuning as the project literally takes its first empirical steps during walking ethnographies in higher education settings. The project explores the paths of students from under-represented groups into the fields of physics and mathematics, and the identities that they build as they engage with these disciplinary areas. We are inspired by socio-material perspectives that consider humans and nonhumans as constantly performed and enacted (de Freitas & Curinga, 2015). In their engagement with the disciplines of physics and mathematics, the students link into socio-historic practices and virtues, learning those through participation (Daston & Gallison 2007). From such a perspective, scientific knowledge can not be separated from the knower. More specifically, Mol (2002) argues that objects and subjects need to be understood as enacted inseparably in the multiple materialized relations of scientific practice. As such, human actors, scientific practices, materialities are all entangled in distributed networks of materialization of practice. Identity can be studied by tracing the assemblages of practice in which bodies, spaces and materials - objects, instruments, artefacts, matter - as well as language as materialities come to be connected (Acton 2017). In order to trace the reciprocity of student identities and scientific materialities we use walking ethnographies to identify configurations of identity that promote students’ successful engagement. In the walking ethnographies students are invited to take the researcher around places of importance to them as physics or mathematics students (e.g. laboratories, lecture halls, social areas, study spaces), focusing on the use of materials in the places (e.g. which objects, materials, instruments are used how and where), how the students experience the places (e.g. as contributing to a sense of belonging or competence, safety and/or insecurity) and their engagement with the room distribution, instruments and other artefacts in these spaces. As such, our methodological pilot seeks to sharpen our ethnographic gaze and our analytical apparatus. In the conference presentation we focus on how the data generated during the walking ethnographies is entangled with our theoretical vantage points, both in the generation and the analysis of the data.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
EERA, 2023
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
utbildningsledarskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214318 (URN)
Konferanse
ECER 2023, Glasgow, UK, August 21-22, 2023
Prosjekter
Immpact
Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-09-11 Laget: 2023-09-11 Sist oppdatert: 2023-09-11bibliografisk kontrollert
Berge, M., Mendick, H., Andreas, O. & Silfver, E. (2023). Walking the line of being a geek or not: race, gender and re-surfacing stereotypes. In: ECER 2023: Programme. Paper presented at ECER 2023, European conference on educational research, Glasgow, UK, August 22-25, 2023. EERA
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Walking the line of being a geek or not: race, gender and re-surfacing stereotypes
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: ECER 2023: Programme, EERA , 2023Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Who is a geek? In popular media the geeks are often portrayed as the school’s losers who perform well in school but have low status (Salter and Blodget, 2017). The low status of the geek/nerd/swot/boffin in schools has had the implication of making it less attractive to study hard (Francis 2009, Jackson & Nyström, 2015). This is especially true for male students who do a balancing act to not be categorised as a geek or nerd (Asp-Onsjö & Öhrn, 2015; Nyström, 2012; Peltola & Phoenix, 2022). Different negative traits are connected to the geek label, such as not caring what to wear and not being sporty, and sometimes boys perform purposely less well in school to avoid this label (Nyström 2012). At the same time as this geek figure is ‘congenitally uncool’ the geek figure has always been strongly connected to science, technology and computer science, and the position of being a genius (Willey & Subramaniam, 2017). The idea of brilliant geekiness has been so powerful that people seeking to hire computer programmers have looked for signs of it as proof of intelligence and programming ability (Kendal 1999). The geek figure, the awkward genius, primarily white and male, has thus gatekeeping functions in technology.

However, over the last decades the geek label has shifted significantly: from historically being associated with mockery and an outsider position, the geek has become increasingly dominant both in popular media as well as in economic and cultural structures (Salter and Blodget, 2017; Tocci 2009). This shift is partly displayed in how geeks are celebrated in real life, for example Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, but also how the geek figure has become a central one in popular media. The geek entrepreneur in movies such as Iron man and The Social Network answers ‘contemporary tensions within masculinity and capitalism’ (Mendick et al, 2021, p. 2). According to Tocci (2009), there are four overlapping images of geeks today: the Geek as a misfit, the Geek as a genius, the Geek as a fan and ‘Geek as chic’. The Geek as a misfit has low status and is awkward and the Geek as a genius (with the example of Bill Gates) is passionate about technology. Both these images are in line with how a geek has traditionally been conceived before. However, the Geek as a fan is described as into geeky hobbies (such as games, science-fiction, and other traditionally geeky media), but with a ‘shared sense of childlike playfulness, and potentially a purposeful resistance against broader norms of maturity’ (p. 322), which is not necessarily a low status position. The image of Geek as chic makes it not just okay to be a geek, but it is actually a high-status position, the geeks are thought to represent their own hip subculture of sorts and their own sense of style. 

How big this shift or movement is around the geek figure is contested and needs to be investigated, especially how the limits and borders have changed in relation to race and gender. There is also an urgent need to address if the geek figure still operates as gatekeeper to technology education. The aim of this study is to explore this shift around the geek figure by interviewing Swedish teenagers about what they think about geeks and geekiness today.  

Methods/methodology: We did group interviews with 32 students doing their third year in upper secondary school, all being 18-19 years old. These 32 students, 21 boys and 11 girls, were classmates in three different school programmes: the Natural Science Programme, the Technology Programme and the Social Science Programme. The students were asked about what a geek is and how it is possible to know if someone is a geek. We also asked if they saw themselves as geeks and if there are any good or bad sides of being a geek. To prompt them to speak of geekiness, we showed them four clips of people handling technology from four US films: Men in Black (1997) featuring Agent J, The Social Network (2010) a biopic of Mark Zuckerberg, Age of Ultron (2015) with Tony Stark and Bruce Banner, and The Black Panther (2018) with the Princess of Wakanda Shuri teasing her brother T’Challa/Black Panther.

In our analysis we focused on how the geek figure was positioned by the students in the interviews, how the students related to the geek figure themselves and how the movie characters in the four selected clips were perceived by the students. The first step in our analysis was, after listening to all the interviews carefully, to select instances where geekiness or geeks were described, looking for storylines of geekiness: How do the students position the geek figure? Positioning is the discursive process that people use in conversations to arrange social structures (Davies and Harré, 1990), where positionings can be deliberate, inadvertent, presumptive or taken for granted (Harré et al., 2009). Positionings are always twofold, in that a positioning of someone else also implies a positioning of oneself, so what they express about geeks gives us clues about their own relationship to geekiness. Storylines that are linked to cultural contexts beyond the actual conversation unfold as participants are engaged in positioning themselves and others (Davies and Harré, 1990; Harré and Langenhove, 1999), for example that the geek has suffered and has unhealed wounds (Mendick et al, 2021) or the idea of STEM being a meritocracy (Willey & Subramaniam, 2017). We also analysed how the movie characters Agent J, Mark Zuckerberg, Tony Stark and Bruce Banner, and Shuri and T’Challa were positioned by the students, with a special focus on race and gender.

Expected outcomes/results: Our results illustrate how upper secondary Swedish students position geeks as belonging to one of two storylines: The storyline of the modern geek where it is cool to be a geek and the position is non-gendered and non-racialised, and The storyline of the stereotypical geek where the geek is white, male, socially awkward, and primally interested in technology. Since the students use the word ‘stereotypical’ when they talk about the low-status geek it is tempting to believe that this position is only a remnant of timed passed, but this storyline is still active in their narratives. For example, they position people at their own school as stereotypical geeks. These two storylines were interlinked. In the storyline of the modern geek the geek position is open for everyone, but this idea was simply not coherent with how many students did not let the character Shuri pass as a geek. The arguments for not positioning her as a geek (apart from being a woman and black), were that Shuri was too good-looking, too well-dressed and too social. Among all the characters we presented to participants, the character of Shuri was the one the students perceived as least authentic. This is interesting, because they continued saying that ‘[today] anyone can become a geek’ and that gender, race, class, and sexuality have no significance. In our reading, this parallel view of what a geek is keeps the myth of a geek meritocracy (Willey & Subramaniam, 2017) intact, at the same time as they clearly were more hesitant to position black women as geeks. Therefore, our data indicates that hopes that the pluralized modern geek position, i.e. ‘the geek is chic’ (Tocci, 2009) will provide a gateway into STEM for black female students are not well-founded.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
EERA, 2023
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214238 (URN)
Konferanse
ECER 2023, European conference on educational research, Glasgow, UK, August 22-25, 2023
Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-09-08 Laget: 2023-09-08 Sist oppdatert: 2023-09-11bibliografisk kontrollert
Paul, R., Lönngren, J. & Berge, M. (2022). Breaking down dualisms in engineering classrooms: how emotions can support engineering problem solving. In: 2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): . Paper presented at 2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2022, Uppsala, Sweden, 8-11 October, 2022.. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Breaking down dualisms in engineering classrooms: how emotions can support engineering problem solving
2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: 2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

This special session aims to explore, discuss, and deconstruct different dualisms in engineering and engineering education. A broad range of dualisms, such as the rational/emotional, technical/social, and theoretical/practical have strongly influenced engineering education and practice since the 17th century. Engineering education researchers have for a long time raised concerns that these dualisms may deter engineers from taking environmental and social concerns into account when designing new technology, and that they may contribute to excluding certain groups of students from striving to become engineers. Still, the dualisms persist and continue to frustrate engineering educators' efforts to teach subjects such as human-centered design, holistic problem solving, and sustainability thinking. In this session, we will explore how these dualisms manifest in participants' classrooms and how they could be challenged. Specifically, participants will engage in collaborative discussions to explore the impacts of dualisms in engineering classrooms. The session will be of particular interest to engineering educators who wish to create more inclusive learning environments where students engage with holistic approaches to engineering.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022
Serie
IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 15394565
Emneord
emotions in engineering, engineering dualisms, hidden curriculum, sociotechnical engineering
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203114 (URN)10.1109/FIE56618.2022.9962596 (DOI)2-s2.0-85143825499 (Scopus ID)9781665462440 (ISBN)
Konferanse
2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2022, Uppsala, Sweden, 8-11 October, 2022.
Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-01-17 Laget: 2023-01-17 Sist oppdatert: 2023-03-24bibliografisk kontrollert
Junkala, H., Berge, M. & Silfver, E. (2022). Diversity in sex and relationship education – limitations and possibilities in Swedish biology textbooks. Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, 22(5), 521-537
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Diversity in sex and relationship education – limitations and possibilities in Swedish biology textbooks
2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, ISSN 1468-1811, E-ISSN 1472-0825, Vol. 22, nr 5, s. 521-537Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Shortcomings in sex and relationship education (SRE) related to norms and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexuality (LGBTQIA) perspectives have been reported internationally and in Sweden. This paper reports on findings from a critical study of SRE content in Swedish biology textbooks for 13- to 16-year-old pupils, with the aim of revealing which sexual orientations and bodies are made visible or invisible in the texts. About 200 quotations were selected and analysed, quantitatively and qualitatively, with a focus on limitations and possibilities. The results show that LGBT content is visible in all SRE chapters. However, sexual orientation is often constructed as fixed. Furthermore, stereotypical gender binaries are reinforced via heteronormative assumptions regarding hormones, genitals and reproduction, focusing on differences instead of similarities, and thus limiting the‌ potential to widen non-binary perceptions of bodies and sexualities. Our quantitative analyses reveal that there are few, if any, queer, intersex, asexual or crip/disability representations. If gaps in young people’s knowledge regarding norms, intersex, asexuality, queer and crip sexualities are to be filled in order to promote equality and diversity, it is important to rethink the SRE content of Swedish biology textbooks.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Routledge, 2022
Emneord
crip, heteronormativity, queer, Sexualities, textbooks
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187934 (URN)10.1080/14681811.2021.1966407 (DOI)000698221900001 ()2-s2.0-85115264403 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2021-09-27 Laget: 2021-09-27 Sist oppdatert: 2023-12-19bibliografisk kontrollert
Prosjekter
Ingenjörsskap i förändring: kunskaps- och identitetsperspektiv på projektarbete i ingenjörsutbildning [2014-02233_VR]; Umeå universitet
Organisasjoner
Identifikatorer
ORCID-id: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3614-1692