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Dennhag, I., Steinvall, A., Hakelind, C. & Deutschmann, M. (2019). Exploring gender stereotypes about interpersonal behavior and personality factors using digital matched-guise techniques. Paper presented at Dennhag, I., Hakelind, C., Steinvall, A., & Deutschmann, M (2017). When research and teaching meet: Experience-based activities for raising awareness about gender stereotypes. Gender conference 12 april. Umeå Universitet.. Social behavior and personality, 47(8), Article ID e8150.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring gender stereotypes about interpersonal behavior and personality factors using digital matched-guise techniques
2019 (English)In: Social behavior and personality, ISSN 0301-2212, E-ISSN 1179-6391, Vol. 47, no 8, article id e8150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current study explores gender stereotypes among Swedish university students (n=101) studying a course in psychology, using a matched-guise experimental design. The gender identity of a speaker in a dialogue, manifested by voice, was digitally manipulated to sound male or female. Responses to the recordings indicated that an actor with a male voice was rated significantly less conscientious, agreeable, extraverted, and open to experience than the same actor with a female voice. On social behavior, there was a tendency for the actor with a male voice to be rated as more hostile than the same actor with a female voice. The study suggests that stereotype effects rather than real behavioral differences may have an impact on perceived gender differences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Journal Publishers, 2019
Keywords
Stereotypes, Gender differences, Interpersonal understanding, Personality, Education, Expectancies
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology; Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157914 (URN)10.2224/sbp.8150 (DOI)000480459300006 ()
Conference
Dennhag, I., Hakelind, C., Steinvall, A., & Deutschmann, M (2017). When research and teaching meet: Experience-based activities for raising awareness about gender stereotypes. Gender conference 12 april. Umeå Universitet.
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Zelime, j. & Deutschmann, M. (2018). Conflicting ideologies: When the ideological Meets the Perceived and Operational- A Study of primary teachers' attitudes, perceptions and practice of Seychelles Creole (Kreol Seselwa) and English as mediums of instruction in the Seychelles Primary Schools.. In: Kari Smith (Ed.), Norsk og internasjonal lærerutdanningsforskning: Hvor er vi? Hvor vil vi gå? Hva skal vi gjøre nå? (pp. 129-151). Norway: Fagbokforlaget
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conflicting ideologies: When the ideological Meets the Perceived and Operational- A Study of primary teachers' attitudes, perceptions and practice of Seychelles Creole (Kreol Seselwa) and English as mediums of instruction in the Seychelles Primary Schools.
2018 (English)In: Norsk og internasjonal lærerutdanningsforskning: Hvor er vi? Hvor vil vi gå? Hva skal vi gjøre nå? / [ed] Kari Smith, Norway: Fagbokforlaget, 2018, p. 129-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper builds on Zelime & Deutschmann, 2016, where we examined language ideologies/directives in the Ideological and Formal domains of the curriculum in a multilingual postcolonial context – the Seychelles. Our overall conclusion from this work was that there was a clear mismatch between the roles that different languages were ascribed in these two domains. In this paper we look at manifestations of the Ideological and Formal curricula in the Perceived and Operational domains of the curriculum, more specifically, the language beliefs, attitudes and classroom practices of primary school teachers. We base our findings on questionnaire answers from 142 respondents in 22 primary schools, coupled with classroom observations and teacher interviews. The Seychelles has a fairly typical postcolonial language-in-education system and follows a transitional model of medium of instruction (hereafter MoI). In this system children are taught in Kreol Seselwa (hereafter K.S.), the mother tongue of the vast majority, during the first two years of schooling after which it is replaced by English. Officially, K.S. retains its role as a “support language”, but in reality, controversies surround this practice. Our results indicate that while K.S. plays a central role in the everyday lives of the teachers, they are surprisingly negative to its role in education. The majority want to see it removed altogether and replaced by an English-only model. At the same time most teachers also acknowledge the importance of K.S. as a support language. Using a framework of postcolonial theory, we try to explain this inconsistency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Norway: Fagbokforlaget, 2018
Keywords
Post-colonialism, Seychelles Creole (Kreol Seselwa), Second Language Medium of Instruction (L2MoI)
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147923 (URN)9788245022599 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-22 Created: 2018-05-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Deutschmann, M., Steinvall, A. & Lagerström, A. (2016). Raising language awareness using digital media: methods for revealing linguistic stereotyping. In: Matt Hayler and Gabrielle Griffin (Ed.), Research methods for creating and curating data in the digital humanities: (pp. 158-180). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Raising language awareness using digital media: methods for revealing linguistic stereotyping
2016 (English)In: Research methods for creating and curating data in the digital humanities / [ed] Matt Hayler and Gabrielle Griffin, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016, p. 158-180Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Whether we are aware of it or not, language is at the heart of the mechanisms leading to stereotyping and inequality. It is one of the major factors that we evaluate when we meet others, and it has long been demonstrated that individuals are judged in terms of intellect and other character traits on the basis of their language output (e.g. Cavallaro & Chin 2009). We also adapt our own language to fit underlying norms and preconceived social stereotypes when we communicate with others. In this way, we help to shape individuals through the way we treat them linguistically, and social identity expressed through language is consequently something that is renegotiated during every meeting between humans (Crawford 1995). An awareness of such mechanisms is especially important for teachers.

In most language courses aimed at student teachers of various levels, students are given a theoretical overview of research on aspects related to identity (gender, ethnicity, social class etc.) and language. But however well intended, there is a real danger that research focussed on identifying differences also strengthens stereotypes. Further, there is a risk that such theoretical knowledge remains just that; creating the link between so-called factual knowledge – for example, theoretical frameworks and previous studies – and internalized knowledge, applicable in our everyday lives, is especially challenging. This is particularly true in the domain of language, where metalinguistic knowledge ideally should be translated into professional language practice, a key skill for anyone working with human interaction.

The Chapter explores  preliminary experiments conducted in 2011 where we were able to use digital media in order manipulate identity variables such as gender, and describes the aim of the current project - to further develop and explore experiential pedagogic approaches aimed at raising sociolinguistic language awareness about conceived identity-related phenomena in language, and to systematically test the effects of these methods. The project thereby combines the fields of sociolinguistics, social psychology and digital humanities in an innovative way with the objective to produce tested methods for exposing and combatting linguistic stereotyping. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016
Series
Research methods for the arts and humanities
Keywords
Stereotyping, matched-guise, gender, language
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128313 (URN)9781474409650 (ISBN)9781474409643 (ISBN)9781474409667 (ISBN)9781474409674 (ISBN)
Projects
RAVEC-RAVE
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-1972Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, MAW 2103.0103
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Zelime, J. & Deutschmann, M. (2016). Revisiting the Trilingual Language-in-Education policy in the Seychelles National Curriculum Framework and Subject Curricula: Intentions and Practice. Island Studies, Indian Ocean/Océan Indien, 3(1), 50-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revisiting the Trilingual Language-in-Education policy in the Seychelles National Curriculum Framework and Subject Curricula: Intentions and Practice
2016 (English)In: Island Studies, Indian Ocean/Océan Indien, ISSN 1694-2582, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 50-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The policy documents of a country’s education system can provide evidence of that particular country’s vision for its people’s socio-economic, socio-cultural and academic development. Such documents can also say much about the power relations between different languages that might be represented within it. Educators, policy makers, educational leaders, teachers, learners and parents are some key players directly or indirectly affected by these policy documents. Using Critical Discourse Analysis and Spolsky’s (2004, 2012) framework for language policy analysis, this paper investigates the trilingual language-in-education policy in the Seychelles National Curriculum Framework (2013) and three Subject Curricula (English, Kreol Seselwa and French), with the aim to explore how the documents relate at the levels of policy planning, implementation and practice. Our findings reveal that there are discrepancies between the overarching Curriculum Framework, where all three national languages are given central roles and equal status, and the Subject Curricula, where clear differences in the power and functions of the languages emerge. Further, on a more pragmatic level, it is of concern that the current policy documents do not explicitly acknowledge the role of the language instruction as a vehicle for learning when describing learning goals and terminal objectives – a good understanding of English (the current L2 medium of instruction) is a prerequisite for succeeding in education. Further, the lack of attention to the question of L2 writing literacy and the fact that Seychellois students have to become fairly advanced English writers at an early age if they want to communicate their knowledge across the curriculum is particularly disconcerting.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Seychelles: Seychelles University, 2016
Keywords
language-in-education planning, L2 medium of instruction, Kreol Seselwa, multilingualism
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
language studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128311 (URN)
Note

Proceedings of the International Conference on Education (University of Seychelles, 5-8 July 2015)

Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M. & Vu, M. T. (2015). Computer assisted language learning in language education: an overview of theories, methods, and current practices (1ed.). In: Eva Lindgren & Janet Enever (Ed.), Språkdidaktik: researching language teaching and learning (pp. 43-60). Umeå: Department of Language Studies, Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer assisted language learning in language education: an overview of theories, methods, and current practices
2015 (English)In: Språkdidaktik: researching language teaching and learning / [ed] Eva Lindgren & Janet Enever, Umeå: Department of Language Studies, Umeå University , 2015, 1, p. 43-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Department of Language Studies, Umeå University, 2015 Edition: 1
Series
Umeå studies in language and literature ; 26
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
language teaching and learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106898 (URN)978-91-7601-194-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-08-12 Created: 2015-08-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M. & Zelime, J. (2015). “I used to like writing in Kreol but now I only use English”: an exploratory study of language attitudes and examination performance among primary and secondary school pupils in the Seychelles. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 2014 International Colloquium on Creole Language and Didactics in the Indian Ocean region.. Island Studies, 10(2), 36-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“I used to like writing in Kreol but now I only use English”: an exploratory study of language attitudes and examination performance among primary and secondary school pupils in the Seychelles
2015 (English)In: Island Studies, ISSN 1694-2582, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 36-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to a colonial legacy, numerous nations have been struggling to find the role of indigenous languages in officialdom. In many such contexts, the ex-colonial language/s (often English) still represent the path to economic success and prestige, while local vernaculars are low in status and confined to less formal domains. In this respect, Creole languages have traditionally been particularly stigmatised.

In the following article, we will examine pupils’ (year one to nine) language attitudes towards the three national languages in the Seychelles – the mother tongue Kreol Seselwa, and the two ex-colonial languages English and French – in two schools, and explore how these attitudes compare with the general performance in the national examinations. The results show that pupils in primary school are positive towards Kreol in all four literacy skill domains, and that these positive attitudes are mirrored in the P6 national examinations. In contrast, there is a clear change in attitudes towards writing and reading in Kreol, once pupils enter the secondary level; secondary school pupils do not seem to favour Kreol as a written medium. We are also able to show that the positive attitudes pupils in primary and secondary schools also hold towards English are not reflected in exam results. English together with Mathematics are the two subjects with the lowest national average grades in the P6 examinations. Finally, our results indicate that girls hold more favourable attitudes towards all the key literacy skills in all the languages investigated, and that these attitudes are reflected in the performance in the national examinations; girls outscore boys in all the language subjects and the poor performance of boys, especially in written English, is of concern. We argue that the positive attitudes and results in Kreol in primary school should be built on in order to increase general literacy in all language subjects, and that extending the role of Kreol as an academic subject into secondary levels may help in this pursuit and raise literacy levels as well as the general status of the language. Further the findings have greater implications for language-in-education policies in post-colonial contexts, some of which are discussed below. 

Abstract [fr]

En raison d'un héritage colonial, de nombreuses nations peinent à défi nir le rôle des langues autochtones au sein d'un cadre offi ciel. Dans de nombreux cas, l'ancienne/les anciennes langue(s) coloniale(s) (souvent l'anglais) représente(nt) toujours la voie de la réussite économique et du prestige, alors que les langues vernaculaires locales ont un statut peu-relevé et leur usage est limité à des domaines moins formels. Ainsi, les langues créoles ont traditionnellement été stigmatisées de façon particulière.Dans cette présente communication, nous examineronsl'attitude linguistique des apprenants (se situant à divers niveaux d'apprentissage, entre la première et la neuvième année de scolarité) envers les trois langues nationales des Seychelles, à savoir la langue maternelle, le Kreol Seselwa, et les langues de deux anciens pouvoirs coloniaux : le français et l'anglais, dans deux écoles. Nous verrons aussi comment établir un lien entre ces attitudes et la performance générale notée au cours des examens nationaux. Les résultatsdémontrent que les élèves au niveau primaire ont une attitude positive envers le Kreol dans les quatre compétences langagières et que ces attitudes positives se refl ètent au niveau des examens nationaux en P6. En revanche, il y a un net changement d'attitude envers l'écriture et la lecture en Kreol, une fois que les élèves passent au secondaire, où ils ne semblent pas favoriser le Kreol comme un support écrit. Nous sommes également en mesure de démontrer que les attitudes positives des apprenants dans les écoles primaires et secondaires envers l'anglais ne sont pas refl étées dans leurs performances académiques dans cette matière. L'anglais et les mathématiques sont les deux matières où l'on enregistre les moyennes nationales les plus faibles au niveau des examens de P6. Enfi n, nos résultats indiquent que les fi lles ont des attitudes plus favorables à l'égard de toutes les compétences langagières, toutes langues confondues, et que ces attitudes se refl ètent en termes de performance aux examens nationaux. Les fi lles obtiennent, en effet, de meilleurs résultats que les garçons dans toutes les matières se rapportant aux langues, alors que la mauvaise performance des garçons, en particulier pour l'écrit en anglais, est source de préoccupation.Nous soutenons que les attitudes et les résultats positifs par rapport au Kreol à l'école primaire devraient constituer une base pour accroître le niveau général d'alphabétisation dans toutes les langues. De plus, un prolongement du rôle du Kreol en tant que matière académique au niveau secondaire peut aider dans cette quête et augmenter en même temps l'alphabétisation, la performance, ainsi que le statut général de cette langue. En outre, les résultats de nos recherches ont des implications plus larges par rapport aux dispositions régissant la place des langues dans l'éducation, et ce, dans des contextes postcoloniaux. Certains de ces résultats sont discutés ci-dessous.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Anse Royale, Seychelles: University of Seychelles, 2015
Keywords
post-colonial, language attitudes, language policies, language-in-education planning, L2 medium of instruction
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
language teaching and learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106896 (URN)
Conference
Proceedings of the 2014 International Colloquium on Creole Language and Didactics in the Indian Ocean region.
Available from: 2015-08-12 Created: 2015-08-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ivanov, S., Deutschmann, M. & Enever, J. (2015). Researching language-in-education policies: evidence from the Seychelles, Russia and the European Union. In: Eva Lindgren and Janet Enever (Ed.), Språkdidaktik: researching language teaching and learning (pp. 85-101). Umeå: Department of Language Studies, Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researching language-in-education policies: evidence from the Seychelles, Russia and the European Union
2015 (English)In: Språkdidaktik: researching language teaching and learning / [ed] Eva Lindgren and Janet Enever, Umeå: Department of Language Studies, Umeå University , 2015, p. 85-101Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Department of Language Studies, Umeå University, 2015
Series
Umeå studies in language and literature ; 26
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
language teaching and learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104303 (URN)978-91-7601-194-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-06-09 Created: 2015-06-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M. & Zelime, J. (2014). Towards a framework for investigating Language-in-education policies in second-language medium of instruction contexts. Island Studies, 1(1), 68-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a framework for investigating Language-in-education policies in second-language medium of instruction contexts
2014 (English)In: Island Studies, ISSN 1694-2582, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 68-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many studies have shown that Second Language (L2) Medium of Instruction (MoI) policies in Africa are linked to educational inequity, substandard teaching practice, low literacy skills and poor overall academic performance. In the light of this background, this paper proposes a framework for making more thorough enquiries into questions related to L2 as MoI, L2 writing and academic success. The framework uses the Seychelles, a small island nation in the Indian Ocean, as its point of departure. Here the L1, Seychelles Creole, is used as MoI during the first two years of education and is then abruptly replaced by English – a practice model typical in the region. Given that primary six and secondary five national exams indicate that many learners have limited literacy skills in English, it is reasonable to postulate that current policies may contribute to educational inequity, especially given that the present-day system relies heavily on written examinations.

Taking its vantage point from a Social Practice (Street, 1984) model of literacy (Purcell-Gates, Perry & Briseño, 2011), the proposed framework approaches the “problem” from several perspectives such as curriculum questions related to L2 and L1 literacy and how/whether these live up to practical student needs; the learner perspective and how external factors may affect learners’ prerequisites to acquire adequate L2 literacy skills; teaching aspects that may affect learning; the role of L1 literacy in L2 literacy development, and sociolinguistic factors such as the status of the languages in question in society. An eclectic approach is proposed in order to shed more light on the effects of L2 MoI in the Seychelles, with the ultimate aim to provide a more informed foundation for future educational policy making. The proposed framework is highly relevant for all post-colonial contexts where L2s are used as MoIs.

Abstract [fr]

De nombreuses études ont démontré que l’utilisation d’une langue seconde (L2) en tant que médium d’enseignement en Afrique conduit à des situations d’iniquité éducative, à des pratiques d’enseignement inférieures, à un faible taux d’alphabétisation, et à des performances académiques marginales. Dans un tel contexte, la présente communication formule une proposition en vue de l’établissement d’un cadre pour l’examen en profondeur des questions liées à l’utilisation de la langue seconde en tant que médium d’enseignement, à l’écriture dans une langue seconde, et au succès académique. Le cadre utilise les Seychelles, petit Etat insulaire de l’océan Indien, comme point de départ. Aux Seychelles, la langue première (L1) – le kreol seselwa – est utilisée comme médium d’enseignement pendant les deux premières années de scolarité, avant de céder la place à l’anglais de façon abrupte – un modèle de pratique courant dans la région. Etant donné que les examens nationaux au niveau de la sixième année du primaire et de la cinquième année du secondaire laissent transparaitre des compétences limitées en lecture-écriture en anglais, on peut en déduire que les politiques linguistiques actuelles peuvent contribuer à une situation d’iniquité éducative, compte tenu du fait que le système en place dépend fortement des examens écrits. Inspiré d’un modèle d’alphabétisation (Purcell-Gates, Perry & Briseño, 2011) de Pratique Sociale (Street, 1984), le cadre proposé s’attaque à la « problématique » de plusieurs angles, par exemple en considérant les aspects du curriculum qui concernent la lecture et l’écriture en langues première et seconde et en interrogeant comment/ si celles-ci répondent aux besoins des apprenants ; la perspective de l’apprenant et la façon dont les facteurs externes peuvent affecter les prérequis des apprenants en vue de l’acquisition de compétences adéquates pour la lecture et l’écriture en langue seconde ; les éléments de l’enseignement susceptibles d’affecter l’apprentissage ; le rôle de l’alphabétisation en L1 pour le développement de l’alphabétisation en L2 ; ainsi que les facteurs sociolinguistiques et le statut social des langues en question. Une approche éclectique est proposée afi n de mettre davantage en lumière les effets de la L2 en tant que médium d’enseignement aux Seychelles, avec le but ultime de construire une fondation plus solide pour l’établissement des politiques éducatives à venir. Le cadre proposé est hautement approprié pour des contextes où des L2 sont utilisé

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Seychelles: University of Seychelles, 2014
National Category
Specific Languages Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102105 (URN)
Available from: 2015-04-22 Created: 2015-04-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wang, A., Steinvall, A. & Deutschmann, M. (2014). Who owns the floor?: Examining participation in a collaborative learning scenario between student teachers and active professionals in second life. International Journal of Virtual and Personal Learning Environments, 5(1), 34-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who owns the floor?: Examining participation in a collaborative learning scenario between student teachers and active professionals in second life
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Virtual and Personal Learning Environments, ISSN 1947-8518, E-ISSN 1947-8526, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 34-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the effects of unequal power relations on participation in a group of student teachers and invited professionals in two collaborative workshops in Second Life. The data includes recordings, group reflections, and individual questionnaires. Participation was examined from the aspects of floor space, turn length, and utterance functions and complemented with student reflections. The results show that at a general level, the differences of floor space and turn length between the invited professionals and the students were small. Moreover, the invited professionals did more conversational management than the students, while the students performed more supportive speech acts. There were, however, individual variations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey: IGI Global, 2014
Keywords
Participation, Floor Space, Turn Length, Discourse Functions, Unequal Power Relations, Second Life, Collaboration, Network.
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81080 (URN)10.4018/ijvple.2014010103 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-10-01 Created: 2013-10-01 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M. (2013). Creating Online Community: Challenges and Solutions (1ed.). In: Kirk P.H. Sullivan, Peter E. Czigler and Jenny M. Sullivan Hellgren (Ed.), Cases on Professional Distance Education Degree Programs and Practices: Successes, Challenges, and Issues (pp. 86-111). Hershey: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creating Online Community: Challenges and Solutions
2013 (English)In: Cases on Professional Distance Education Degree Programs and Practices: Successes, Challenges, and Issues / [ed] Kirk P.H. Sullivan, Peter E. Czigler and Jenny M. Sullivan Hellgren, Hershey: IGI Global, 2013, 1, p. 86-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The challenges in creating a collaborative environment for online learning are great. This chapter describes some practical examples of community building in online learning contexts and discusses the effects of such activities. It draws its data from six years of online courses in English at Mid Sweden University, where the author was employed from 2003-2009 and worked with development and implementation of their Internet course program. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey: IGI Global, 2013 Edition: 1
Series
Advances in Mobile and Distance Learning (AMDL) Book Series, ISSN 2327-1892
Keywords
Distance Education, Education, Educational Technologies, Online Community building
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80992 (URN)978-1-4666-4487-8 (ISBN)978-1-4666- 4488-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-09-30 Created: 2013-09-30 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4429-5720

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