umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Hernell, Olle
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 180) Show all publications
Lönnerdal, B. & Hernell, O. (2016). An Opinion on "Staging'' of Infant Formula: A Developmental Perspective on Infant Feeding. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, 62(1), 9-21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Opinion on "Staging'' of Infant Formula: A Developmental Perspective on Infant Feeding
2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 62, no 1, 9-21 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Breast milk is a dynamic fluid with compositional changes occurring throughout the period of lactation. Some of these changes in nutrient concentrations reflect the successively slowing growth rate and developmental changes in metabolic requirements that infants undergo during the first year of life. Infant formula, in contrast, has a static composition, intended to meet the nutritional requirements of infants from birth to 6 or 12 months of age. To better fit the metabolic needs of infants and to avoid nutrient limitations or excesses, we suggest that infant formulas should change in composition with the age of the infant, that is, different formulas are created/used for different ages during the first year of life. We propose that specific formulas for 0 to 3 months (stage 1), 3 to 6 months (stage 2), and 6 to 12 months (stage 3) of age may be nutritionally and physiologically advantageous to infants. Although this initially may impose some difficult practical/conceptual issues, we believe that this staging concept would improve nutrition of formula-fed infants and, ultimately, improve outcomes and make their performance more similar to that of breast-fed infants.

Keyword
formula-feeding, human milk, infant nutrition
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117409 (URN)10.1097/MPG.0000000000000806 (DOI)000369300200001 ()25844707 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Videhult, F. K., Öhlund, I., Hernell, O. & West, C. E. (2016). Body mass but not vitamin D status is associated with bone mineral content and density in young school children in northern Sweden. Food & Nutrition Research, 60, Article ID 30045.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body mass but not vitamin D status is associated with bone mineral content and density in young school children in northern Sweden
2016 (English)In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 60, 30045Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: High latitude of residence where sun exposure is limited affects vitamin D status. Although vitamin D levels have been associated with poor bone health, cut-off values for optimising bone health are yet to be decided. Objective: To assess vitamin D intake and status among young school children living at latitude 63-64 degrees N, in northern Sweden and to examine the association between vitamin D status and bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD). Design: In a cross-sectional study, diet was assessed by a 4-day food diary and a food frequency questionnaire in 8- to 9-year-old children (n = 120). Energy, vitamin D, and calcium intakes were calculated. Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer for 7 days. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25[OH]D) levels were analysed by high-pressure liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-mass spectrometry (n = 113). BMC and BMD were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Height and weight were measured by standard procedures and BMI z-score was calculated using WHO AnthroPlus programme. Results: The majority of children, 91%, did not reach the recommended vitaminDintake of 7.5 mu g/day and 50% had insufficient S-25[OH]D levels defined as <50 nmol/l. The highest concentrations of S-25[OH]D were observed during the summer months (p = 0.01). Body mass (p < 0.01) but not S-25[OH]D was associated with measures of BMC and BMD. Furthermore, boys had higher total BMC (p = 0.01), total body less head BMC (p = 0.02), fat free mass (p < 0.01), and a higher degree of physical activity (p = 0.01) compared to girls. Conclusions: Body mass was related to BMC and BMD measures in a population of prepubertal school children living at high latitudes in Sweden. Despite insufficient S-25[OH]D levels and low vitamin D intake, this did not appear to affect bone parameters. Prospective studies with repeated assessment of vitamin D status are needed to examine cut-off values for optimising bone health.

Keyword
dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, season, latitude, diet, calcium
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121495 (URN)10.3402/fnr.v60.30045 (DOI)000375881800001 ()26945233 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-17 Created: 2016-06-02 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Hernell, O., Timby, N., Domellöf, M. & Lönnerdal, B. (2016). Clinical Benefits of Milk Fat Globule Membranes for Infants and Children. Journal of Pediatrics, 173, S60-S65.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical Benefits of Milk Fat Globule Membranes for Infants and Children
2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 1097-6833, Vol. 173, S60-S65 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) in breast milk contains many bioactive components. Infant formulas traditionally have been devoid of the MFGM fraction, but dairy technology now has made the addition of bovine MFGM technically feasible. We identified 6 double-blinded randomized controlled trials exploring the effects of MFGM supplementation on the diets of infants or children. Results suggest that supplementation is safe and indicate positive effects on both neurodevelopment and defense against infections. MFGM supplementation of infant formula may narrow the gap in cognitive performance and infection rates between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Because of the small number of studies and the heterogeneity of interventions, more high-quality double-blinded randomized controlled trials are needed, with well characterized and clearly defined MFGM fractions, before firm conclusions on the effects of MFGM supplementation on the health and development of infants can be drawn.

National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122557 (URN)10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.02.077 (DOI)000376533900009 ()27234413 (PubMedID)
Note

Supplement: Emerging Roles of Bioactive Components in Pediatric Nutrition

Available from: 2016-07-27 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Casper, C., Hascoet, J.-M., Ertl, T., Gadzinowski, J. S., Carnielli, V., Rigo, J., . . . Hernell, O. (2016). Recombinant Bile Salt-Stimulated Lipase in Preterm Infant Feeding: A Randomized Phase 3 Study. PLoS ONE, 11(5), Article ID e0156071.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recombinant Bile Salt-Stimulated Lipase in Preterm Infant Feeding: A Randomized Phase 3 Study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, e0156071Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction Feeding strategies are critical for healthy growth in preterm infants. Bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), present in human milk, is important for fat digestion and absorption but is inactivated during pasteurization and absent in formula. This study evaluated if recombinant human BSSL (rhBSSL) improves growth in preterm infants when added to formula or pasteurized breast milk. Patients and Methods LAIF (Lipase Added to Infant Feeding) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study in infants born before 32 weeks of gestation. The primary efficacy variable was growth velocity (g/kg/day) during 4 weeks intervention. Follow-up visits were at 3 and 12 months. The study was performed at 54 centers in 10 European countries. Results In total 415 patients were randomized (rhBSSL n = 207, placebo n = 208), 410 patients were analyzed (rhBSSL n = 206, placebo n = 204) and 365 patients were followed until 12 months. Overall, there was no significantly improved growth velocity during rhBSSL treatment compared to placebo (16.77 vs. 16.56 g/kg/day, estimated difference 0.21 g/kg/day, 95% CI [-0.40; 0.83]), nor were secondary endpoints met. However, in a predefined subgroup, small for gestational age infants, there was a significant effect on growth in favor of rhBSSL during treatment. The incidence of adverse events was higher in the rhBSSL group during treatment. Conclusions Although this study did not meet its primary endpoint, except in a subgroup of infants small for gestational age, and there was an imbalance in short-term safety, these data provide insights in nutrition, growth and development in preterm infants.

National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123069 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0156071 (DOI)000377146100014 ()27244221 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-01 Created: 2016-06-27 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Karlsland Åkeson, P., Lind, T., Hernell, O., Silfverdal, S.-A. & Öhlund, I. (2016). Serum Vitamin D Depends Less on Latitude Than on Skin Color and Dietary Intake During Early Winter in Northern Europe. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, 62(4), 643-649.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serum Vitamin D Depends Less on Latitude Than on Skin Color and Dietary Intake During Early Winter in Northern Europe
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 62, no 4, 643-649 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate if dietary vitamin D intake is adequate for sufficient vitamin D status during early winter in children living in Sweden, irrespective of latitude or skin color.

METHODS: As part of a prospective, comparative, two-center intervention study in northern (63°N) and southern (55°N) Sweden, dietary intake, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25(OH) D), associated laboratory variables, and socio-demographic data were studied in 5 to 7-year-old children with fair and dark skin in November and December.

RESULTS: 206 children with fair/dark skin were included, 44/41 and 64/57 children in northern and southern Sweden, respectively. Dietary vitamin D intake was higher in northern than southern Sweden (p=0.001), irrespective of skin color, partly due to higher consumption of fortified foods, but only met 50-70% of national recommendations (10 μg/day). S-25(OH) D was higher in northern than southern Sweden, in children with fair (67 vs. 59 nmol/L; p < 0.05) and dark skin (56 vs. 42 nmol/L; p < 0.001). S-25(OH) D was lower in dark than fair skinned children at both sites (p < 0.01), and below 50 nmol/L in 40 and 75% of dark-skinned children in northern and southern Sweden, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Insufficient vitamin D status was common during early winter in children living in Sweden, particularly in those with dark skin. Although, higher dietary vitamin D intake in northern than southern Sweden attenuated the effects of latitude, a northern country of living combined with darker skin and vitamin D intake below recommendations are important risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
Keyword
latitude, skin color, 25-hydroxy-vitamin D, child, diet
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Endocrinology and Diabetes Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-116960 (URN)10.1097/MPG.0000000000001028 (DOI)000373209900024 ()26628439 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-24 Created: 2016-02-16 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Vandenplas, Y., Alarcon, P., Fleischer, D., Hernell, O., Kolacek, S., Laignelet, H., . . . Lee, W. S. (2016). Should Partial Hydrolysates Be Used as Starter Infant Formula?: A Working Group Consensus. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, 62(1), 22-35.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Should Partial Hydrolysates Be Used as Starter Infant Formula?: A Working Group Consensus
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 62, no 1, 22-35 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Partially hydrolyzed formulas (pHFs) are increasingly used worldwide, both in the prevention of atopic disease in at-risk infants and in the therapeutic management of infants with functional gastrointestinal manifestations. Because prevention is always preferable to treatment, we reviewed the literature aiming to find an answer for the question whether pHF may be recommended for feeding all infants if breast-feeding is not possible. PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched up to December 2014. In addition, to search for data that remained undetected by the searches, we approached authors of relevant articles and major producers of pHFs asking for unpublished data. Because few data were found, nonrandomized, controlled trials and trials in preterm infants were included as well. Overall, only limited data could be found on the efficacy and safety of pHF in healthy term infants. Available data do not indicate that pHFs are potentially harmful for healthy, term infants. With respect to long-term outcomes, particularly referring to immune, metabolic and hormonal effects, data are, however, nonexistent. From a regulatory point of view, pHFs meet the nutrient requirements to be considered as standard formula for term healthy infants. Cost, which is different from country to country, should be considered in the decision-making process. Based on limited available data, the use of pHF in healthy infants is safe with regard to growth. The lack of data, in particular for metabolic consequences and long-term outcomes, is, however, the basis for our recommendation that health authorities should develop and support long-term follow-up studies. Efficacy and long-term safety data are required before a recommendation of this type of formula for all infants can be made.

Keyword
infant feeding, infant formula, partial hydrolysate, starter formula
National Category
Pediatrics Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117403 (URN)10.1097/MPG.0000000000001014 (DOI)000369300200002 ()26513620 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Timby, N., Domellöf, M., Lönnerdal, B. & Hernell, O. (2015). Comment on "Safety and Tolerance Evaluation of Milk Fat Globule Membrane-Enriched Infant Formulas: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Non-Inferiority Trial in Healthy Term Infants" [Letter to the editor]. Clinical Medicine Insights: Pediatrics, 9, 63-64.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comment on "Safety and Tolerance Evaluation of Milk Fat Globule Membrane-Enriched Infant Formulas: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Non-Inferiority Trial in Healthy Term Infants"
2015 (English)In: Clinical Medicine Insights: Pediatrics, ISSN 1179-5565, Vol. 9, 63-64 p.Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Keyword
allergy prevention, asthma, eczema, Lactobacillus paracasei ssp paracasei F19, nitric oxide
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118624 (URN)10.4137/CMPed.S27185 (DOI)26124694 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-24 Created: 2016-03-24 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Koletzko, B., Fewtrell, M., Gibson, R., van Goudoever, J. B., Hernell, O., Szajewska, H. & Shamir, R. (2015). Core Data Necessary for Reporting Clinical Trials on Nutrition in Infancy. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 66(1), 31-35.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Core Data Necessary for Reporting Clinical Trials on Nutrition in Infancy
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 66, no 1, 31-35 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents an updated and revised summary of the 'core data set' that has been proposed to be recorded and reported in all clinical trials on infant nutrition by the recently formed Consensus Group on Outcome Measures Made in Paediatric Enteral Nutrition Clinical Trials (COMMENT). This core data set was developed based on a previous proposal by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition in 2003. It comprises confidential data to identify subjects and facilitate contact for further follow-up, data to characterize the cohort studied and data on withdrawals from the study, and some additional core data for all nutrition studies on preterm infants. We recommend that all studies on nutrition in infancy should collect and report this core data set to facilitate interpretation and comparison of results from clinical studies, and of systematic data evaluation and meta-analyses. Editors of journals publishing such reports are encouraged to require the reporting of the minimum data set described here either in the main body of the publication or as supplementary online material.

Keyword
Clinical trials, Data reporting, Human experimentation, Meta-analysis, Research subjects
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100976 (URN)10.1159/000365766 (DOI)000349659900005 ()25531862 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Lönnerdal, B., Georgieff, M. K. & Hernell, O. (2015). Developmental Physiology of Iron Absorption, Homeostasis, and Metabolism in the Healthy Term Infant. Journal of Pediatrics, 167(4, Supplement), S8-S14.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental Physiology of Iron Absorption, Homeostasis, and Metabolism in the Healthy Term Infant
2015 (English)In: Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 1097-6833, Vol. 167, no 4, Supplement, S8-S14 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111496 (URN)10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.07.014 (DOI)000363541000003 ()26364027 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Karlsson Videhult, F., Andersson, Y., Öhlund, I., Stenlund, H., Hernell, O. & West, C. E. (2015). Impact of probiotics during weaning on the metabolic and inflammatory profile: follow-up at school age. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 66(6), 686-691.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of probiotics during weaning on the metabolic and inflammatory profile: follow-up at school age
Show others...
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, ISSN 0963-7486, E-ISSN 1465-3478, Vol. 66, no 6, 686-691 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We hypothesised that feeding the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19 (LF19) (dep. nr LMG P-17806) during weaning would program the metabolic and inflammatory profile and studied its association with previously assessed body composition. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 179 infants were randomised to daily feeding of cereals with or without LF19 10 8 CFU from 4 to 13 months of age. At age 8-9 years, 120 children were reassessed. Using high-sensitivity multiplex immunoassay technology and ELISA, we found that overweight/obese children had increased plasma C-peptide, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, leptin and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) after overnight fasting compared with normal weight children, independently of LF19. After excluding the obese, leptin and hsCRP were still increased, revealing an aberrant metabolic and inflammatory state already in overweight, pre-pubertal children. Higher body mass index z-score, sagittal abdominal diameter, truncal and total body fat % were associated with an aberrant metabolic and inflammatory profile, emphasising the need for early prevention strategies although no programming effect of LF19 was observed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2015
Keyword
body composition, children, inflammation, Lactobacillus paracasei ssp paracasei F19, metabolism, crobiota
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109965 (URN)10.3109/09637486.2015.1025717 (DOI)000361335300012 ()
Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications