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Hernell, Olle
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Publications (10 of 168) Show all publications
Koletzko, B., Fewtrell, M., Gibson, R., van Goudoever, J. B., Hernell, O., Szajewska, H. & Shamir, R. (2015). Core Data Necessary for Reporting Clinical Trials on Nutrition in Infancy. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 66(1), 31-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Core Data Necessary for Reporting Clinical Trials on Nutrition in Infancy
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2015 (English)In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 31-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents an updated and revised summary of the 'core data set' that has been proposed to be recorded and reported in all clinical trials on infant nutrition by the recently formed Consensus Group on Outcome Measures Made in Paediatric Enteral Nutrition Clinical Trials (COMMENT). This core data set was developed based on a previous proposal by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition in 2003. It comprises confidential data to identify subjects and facilitate contact for further follow-up, data to characterize the cohort studied and data on withdrawals from the study, and some additional core data for all nutrition studies on preterm infants. We recommend that all studies on nutrition in infancy should collect and report this core data set to facilitate interpretation and comparison of results from clinical studies, and of systematic data evaluation and meta-analyses. Editors of journals publishing such reports are encouraged to require the reporting of the minimum data set described here either in the main body of the publication or as supplementary online material.

Keyword
Clinical trials, Data reporting, Human experimentation, Meta-analysis, Research subjects
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100976 (URN)10.1159/000365766 (DOI)000349659900005 ()25531862 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Timby, N., Hernell, O., Vaarala, O., Melin, M., Lönnerdal, B. & Domellöf, M. (2015). Infections in infants fed formula supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membranes. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, 60(3), 384-389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infections in infants fed formula supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membranes
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 384-389Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Observational studies have shown that even in high-income countries formula-fed infants have a higher incidence of acute otitis media (AGM), and gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections during the first year of life compared with breast-fed infants. We hypothesized that components of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) may be responsible for some of these differences and that supplementation with bovine MFGM would decrease the infectious morbidity in formula-fed infants.

Methods: In a double-blind randomized controlled trial, 160 formula-fed infants received experimental formula (EF) supplemented with bovine MFGM (EF) or unsupplemented standard formula (SF) from <2 months until 6 months of age. A breast-fed reference group consisted of 80 infants. Disease symptoms, health care contacts, and medication were recorded by the parents until 12 months of age. Serum immunoglobulin G for 10 pneumococcal serotypes was analyzed at 6 months of age.

Results: The cumulative incidence of AOM during the intervention was lower in the EF group than in the SF group (1% vs 9%, P = 0.034), and did not differ from the breast-fed reference group (0%, P = 1.0). The incidence (25% vs 43%, P = 0.021) and longitudinal prevalence (P = 0.012) of antipyretic use were significantly lower in the EF group than in the SF group. Serum immunoglobulin G concentrations against pneumococcal serotypes 1, 5, and 14 were lower in the EF group than in the SF group.

Conclusions: Supplementation of formula with bovine MFGM reduces the risk of AOM, decreases antipyretics use in formula-fed infants, and has immunomodulatory effects on humoral response against pneumococcus vaccine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2015
Keyword
breast-feeding, infant formula, infections, milk fat globule membranes, otitis media
National Category
Pediatrics Nutrition and Dietetics Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-88188 (URN)10.1097/MPG.0000000000000624 (DOI)000350527100023 ()25714582 (PubMedID)
Funder
VINNOVA, 2009-00209
Available from: 2014-04-24 Created: 2014-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Karlsson Videhult, F., Öhlund, I., Stenlund, H., Hernell, O. & West, C. E. (2015). Probiotics during weaning: a follow-up study on effects on body composition and metabolic markers at school age. European Journal of Nutrition, 54(3), 355-363
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probiotics during weaning: a follow-up study on effects on body composition and metabolic markers at school age
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2015 (English)In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 355-363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: An aberrant gut microbiome has been suggested to contribute to the worldwide epidemic of obesity. In animal models, the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19 (LF19) induced upregulation of genes involved in energy homoeostasis, reduced body fat and altered the serum (S) lipoprotein profile. In our previous report, feeding LF19 to infants during weaning impacted the global plasma metabolome. LF19 lowered palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid associated with hypertriglyceridemia and increased visceral adiposity. Therefore, we assessed if feeding LF19 from 4 to 13 months of age would have long-term effects on body composition, growth and metabolic markers.

METHODS: Of 179 children included in our baseline study, 120 entered the follow-up at 8-9 years of age, n = 58 in the probiotic and n = 62 in the placebo group. Body composition was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Anthropometrics of the child and accompanying parent(s) were assessed. S-lipids, insulin, glucose and transaminases were determined after overnight fasting.

RESULTS: LF19 did not affect body mass index z-score, sagittal abdominal diameter, fat-free mass, fat mass index, truncal fat %, android or gynoid fat % and had no long-term impact on any of the assessed metabolic markers (p > 0.05).

CONCLUSION: Feeding LF19 during infancy did not modulate body composition, growth or any of the assessed metabolic markers at school age. The steady increase in probiotic products targeting infants and children calls for long-term follow-up of initiated probiotic intervention studies.

Keyword
Probiotic, Lactobacillus paracasei ssp paracasei F19, Overweight, Long-term effects, Children
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101467 (URN)10.1007/s00394-014-0715-y (DOI)000351513000003 ()24830782 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-31 Created: 2015-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Donovan, S. M., Monaco, M. H., Drnevich, J., Kvistgaard, A. S., Hernell, O. & Lönnerdal, B. (2014). Bovine Osteopontin Modifies the Intestinal Transcriptome of Formula-Fed Infant Rhesus Monkeys to Be More Similar to Those That Were Breastfed. Journal of Nutrition, 144(12), 1910-1919
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bovine Osteopontin Modifies the Intestinal Transcriptome of Formula-Fed Infant Rhesus Monkeys to Be More Similar to Those That Were Breastfed
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 144, no 12, p. 1910-1919Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional protein found in human milk at high concentration.

Objective: The impact of supplemental bovine OPN on growth, body composition, and the jejunal transcriptome was assessed.

Methods: Newborn rhesus monkeys were randomly assigned to be breastfed (n = 4) or to receive formula [formula fed (FF), n = 6] or formula supplemented with 125 mg/L of bovine OPN (bOPN, n = 6) for 3 mo. Jejunal mRNA was extracted and subjected to microarray analysis.

Results: Growth was similar among all the treatment groups, but breastfed monkeys were similar to 25% leaner at 3 mo. Pairwise comparisons demonstrated that 1017 genes were differentially expressed between breastfed and FF groups, 217 between breastfed and bOPN groups, and 119 between FF and bOPN groups. The data were also analyzed with the use of weighted gene coexpression network analysis, which revealed 6 modules of coexpressed genes that differed among the 3 treatments. Nearly 50% of genes were assigned to one module in which breastfed differed from FF and bOPN expression was intermediate. This module was enriched for genes related to cell adhesion and motility, cytoskeletal remodeling, wingless and integration site signaling, and neuronal development. Most of these canonical pathways centered on integrins, which are receptors for OPN.

Conclusions: The intestinal transcriptome of breastfed and FF monkeys differs, but bovine OPN at levels similar to human milk shifts gene expression profiles to be more similar to breastfed monkeys.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
9650 ROCKVILLE PIKE, BETHESDA, MD 20814 USA: American Society for Nutrition, 2014
Keyword
infant, breastfeeding, intestine, osteopontin, micorarray
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-98553 (URN)10.3945/jn.114.197558 (DOI)000345199500005 ()25320184 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Timby, N., Lönnerdal, B., Hernell, O. & Domellöf, M. (2014). Cardiovascular risk markers until 12 mo of age in infants fed a formula supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membranes. Pediatric Research, 76(4), 394-400
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular risk markers until 12 mo of age in infants fed a formula supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membranes
2014 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 76, no 4, p. 394-400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Some of the health advantages of breast-fed as compared to formula-fed infants have been suggested to be due to metabolic programming effects resulting from early nutrition. METHODS: In a prospective double-blinded randomized trial, 160 infants <2 mo of age were randomized to experimental formula (EF) with added milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) or standard formula (SF) until 6 mo of age. A breast-fed reference (BFR) group consisted of 80 infants. Measurements were made at inclusion and at 4, 6, and 12 mo of age. RESULTS: During the intervention, the EF group had higher total serum cholesterol concentration than the SF group, reaching the level of the BFR group. The EF group had a low-density lipoprotein to high-density lipoprotein ratio not significantly different from the SF group but lower than the BFR group. CONCLUSION: Supplementation of infant formula with MFGM modified the fat composition of the formula and narrowed the gap between breast-fed and formula-fed infants with regard to serum lipid status at 12 mo.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2014
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95269 (URN)10.1038/pr.2014.110 (DOI)000342332000010 ()
Available from: 2014-11-04 Created: 2014-10-27 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Buttner, B. E., Witthoft, C. M., Domellöf, M., Hernell, O. & Öhlund, I. (2014). Effect of type of heat treatment of breastmilk on folate content and pattern. Breastfeeding medicine, 9(2), 86-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of type of heat treatment of breastmilk on folate content and pattern
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2014 (English)In: Breastfeeding medicine, ISSN 1556-8253, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 86-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Breastmilk is the recommended aliment for preterm infants. Milk banks provide donated breastmilk for the neonatal care of preterm infants when mother's own milk is not is available. To avoid pathogen transmission, donated breastmilk is heat-treated according to different procedures before administration. There is varying information on the effect of heat treatment on folate in breastmilk. Sufficient folate intake, however, is essential for normal growth and brain development. This study determined and compared the effects of different heat treatments on breastmilk folate content and pattern of individual folate forms. Materials and Methods: Donated Swedish breastmilk samples were heat-treated according to three procedures: two low temperature treatments (57 degrees C, 23 minutes; 62.5 degrees C, 12 minutes) and a rapid high temperature treatment (heating to 73 degrees C in boiling water). The folate content and pattern were determined before and after treatment by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: The folate content in 38 untreated Swedish breastmilk samples was 15046nmol/L. Two different folate vitamers were detected: 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (78 +/- 7%) and tetrahydrofolate (22 +/- 7%). Heat treatment affected only tetrahydrofolate stability and decreased folate content by 15-24%; however, the effects on folate content did not differ among the investigated heat treatment procedures. Conclusions: Folate losses during heat treatment of human milk were considered acceptable. Yet, native folate content of heat-treated, non-fortified breastmilk supplied only 25% of the recommended daily intake for preterm infants.

National Category
Pediatrics Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87635 (URN)10.1089/bfm.2013.0008 (DOI)000331701700007 ()
Available from: 2014-04-10 Created: 2014-04-07 Last updated: 2014-04-10Bibliographically approved
Timby, N., Domellöf, E., Hernell, O., Lönnerdal, B. & Domellöf, M. (2014). Neurodevelopment, nutrition, and growth until 12 mo of age in infants fed a low-energy, low-protein formula supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membranes: a randomized controlled trial1,2,3. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 99(4), 860-868
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurodevelopment, nutrition, and growth until 12 mo of age in infants fed a low-energy, low-protein formula supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membranes: a randomized controlled trial1,2,3
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2014 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 860-868Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Observational studies have indicated that differences in the composition of human milk and infant formula yield benefits in cognitive development and early growth for breastfed infants

Objective: The objective was to test the hypothesis that feeding an infant formula with reduced energy and protein densities and supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) reduces differences in cognitive development and early growth between formula-fed and breastfed infants.

Design: In a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 160 infants <2 mo of age were randomly assigned to be fed an MFGM-supplemented, low-energy, low-protein experimental formula (EF) or a standard formula (SF) until 6 mo of age. The energy and protein contents of the EF and SF were 60 and 66 kcal/100 mL and 1.20 and 1.27 g/100 mL, respectively. A breastfed reference (BFR) group consisted of 80 infants.

Results: At 12 mo of age, the cognitive score (mean ± SD) on testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition, was significantly higher in the EF group than in the SF group (105.8 ± 9.2 compared with 101.8 ± 8.0; P = 0.008) but was not significantly different from that in the BFR group (106.4 ± 9.5; P = 0.73). The EF group ingested larger volumes of formula than did the SF group (864 ± 174 compared with 797 ± 165 mL/d; P = 0.022), fully compensating for the lower energy density. No significant differences in linear growth, weight gain, body mass index, percentage body fat, or head circumference were found between the EF and SF groups.

Conclusions: MFGM supplementation to infant formula narrows the gap in cognitive development between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Between 2 and 6 mo of age, formula-fed term infants have the capacity to upregulate their ingested volumes when the energy density of formula is reduced from 66 to 60 kcal/100 mL. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00624689.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Nutrition, 2014
Keyword
term infants; cognitive-development; 1st year; dietary-cholesterol; published evidence; brain-development; enriched formula; maternal control; clinical-trial; blood-pressure
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86314 (URN)10.3945/ajcn.113.064295 (DOI)000333173100013 ()24500150 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-02-22 Created: 2014-02-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Sjöberg, V., Hollén, E., Pietz, G., Magnusson, K.-E., Fälth-Magnusson, K., Sundström, M., . . . Hammarström, M.-L. (2014). Noncontaminated dietary oats may hamper normalization of the intestinal immune status in childhood celiac disease. Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, 5, Article ID e58.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Noncontaminated dietary oats may hamper normalization of the intestinal immune status in childhood celiac disease
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2014 (English)In: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, ISSN 2155-384X, E-ISSN 2155-384X, Vol. 5, article id e58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Life-long, strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for celiac disease (CD). Because there is still uncertainty regarding the safety of oats for CD patients, the aim was to investigate whether dietary oats influence the immune status of their intestinal mucosa.

METHODS: Paired small intestinal biopsies, before and after >11 months on a GFD, were collected from children with CD who were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind intervention trial to either of two diets: standard GFD (GFD-std; n=13) and noncontaminated oat-containing GFD (GFD-oats; n=15). Expression levels of mRNAs for 22 different immune effector molecules and tight junction proteins were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR.

RESULTS: The number of mRNAs that remained elevated was higher in the GFD-oats group (P=0.05). In particular, mRNAs for the regulatory T cell (Treg) signature molecules interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), the cytotoxicity-activating natural killer (NK) receptors KLRC2/NKG2C and KLRC3/NKG2E, and the tight junction protein claudin-4 remained elevated. Between the two groups, most significant differences were seen for claudin-4 (P=0.003) and KLRC3/NKG2E (P=0.04).

CONCLUSIONS: A substantial fraction of pediatric CD patients seem to not tolerate oats. In these patients, dietary oats influence the immune status of the intestinal mucosa with an mRNA profile suggesting presence of activated cytotoxic lymphocytes and Tregs and a stressed epithelium with affected tight junctions. Assessment of changes in levels of mRNA for claudin-4 and KLC3/NKG2E from onset to after a year on oats containing GFD shows promise to identify these CD patients.

National Category
Basic Medicine Pediatrics
Research subject
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-93052 (URN)10.1038/ctg.2014.9 (DOI)000355530800002 ()24964993 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84903278030 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-09-11 Created: 2014-09-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Timby, N., Hernell, O., Lönnerdal, B. & Domellöf, M. (2014). Parental feeding control in relation to feeding mode and growth pattern in early infancy. Acta Paediatrica, 103(10), 1072-1077
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental feeding control in relation to feeding mode and growth pattern in early infancy
2014 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 10, p. 1072-1077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: A high level of parental control of feeding and disturbed energy self-regulation has previously been suggested as a mechanism for the accelerated growth observed in formula-fed compared with breast-fed infants. This study explored factors associated with parental control of feeding in a population of formula-fed infants with high levels of self-regulation.

Methods: We included 141 formula-fed and 72 breast-fed infants from a randomised controlled trial, who were prospectively followed from under 2 months of age to 12 months of age. Anthropometry was recorded at baseline, 4, 6 and 12 months of age. Parental feeding control was assessed using a Child Feeding Questionnaire at 4 and 12 months.

Results: The formula-fed groups fully compensated for different energy and protein densities by regulating their volume intakes. Parents of formula-fed infants had a lower pressure to eat score at 12 months than parents of breast-fed infants. A high parental restrictive score at 12 months was associated with weight at 12 months and high parental pressure to eat score at 12 months with body mass index at 12 months. Neither were associated with feeding mode.

Conclusion: Formula-fed infants had a high level of energy self-regulation and were subjected to low parental control. Parental control of feeding was mainly influenced by infant growth.

Keyword
breast-feeding, bottle-feeding
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-88187 (URN)10.1111/apa.12721 (DOI)000342753400021 ()
Funder
Vinnova, 2009-00209
Available from: 2014-04-24 Created: 2014-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Casper, C., Carnielli, V. P., Hascoet, J.-M., Lapillonne, A., Maggio, L., Timdahl, K., . . . Hernell, O. (2014). rhBSSL Improves Growth and LCPUFA Absorption in Preterm Infants Fed Formula or Pasteurized Breast Milk. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, 59(1), 61-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>rhBSSL Improves Growth and LCPUFA Absorption in Preterm Infants Fed Formula or Pasteurized Breast Milk
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Preterm infants often experience suboptimal growth, which can affect organ development. The aim of this study was to improve growth by treatment with bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), naturally present in breast milk, but lost after pasteurization, and absent in formula. Methods: Two clinical trials were performed with a predefined analysis of combined data to investigate the effects of recombinant human BSSL (rhBSSL) treatment on growth velocity and fat absorption in preterm infants. The studies were randomized and double-blinded comparing 7-day treatment with rhBSSL and placebo, administered in pasteurized breast milk or formula, using a crossover design. Results: Sixty-three infants were evaluated for safety. At randomization, the mean (standard deviation) weight was 1467 (193) g and mean postmenstrual age was 32.6 (0.5) weeks. Sixty and 46 infants were evaluated for growth velocity and fat absorption, respectively. rhBSSL treatment significantly improved mean growth velocity by 2.93 g.kg(-1).day(-1) (P<0.001) compared with placebo (mean 16.86 vs 13.93 g.kg(-1).day(-1)) and significantly decreased the risk of suboptimal growth (<15 g.kg(-1).day(-1)) (30% vs 52%, P = 0.004). rhBSSL significantly increased absorption of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid by 5.76% (P = 0.013) and 8.55% (P = 0.001), respectively, but had no significant effect on total fat absorption. The adverse-event profile was similar to placebo. Conclusions: In preterm infants fed pasteurized breast milk or formula, 1 week of treatment with rhBSSL was well tolerated and significantly improved growth and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid absorption compared to placebo. This publication presents the first data regarding the use of rhBSSL in preterms and the results have led to further clinical studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014
Keyword
clinical study, fat absorption, growth velocity, preterm infant, recombinant human bile-salt-stimulated lipase
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91371 (URN)10.1097/MPG.0000000000000365 (DOI)000338125000025 ()
Available from: 2014-08-14 Created: 2014-08-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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