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Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
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Publications (10 of 268) Show all publications
Brink, M., Hansson, M., Mathsson-Alm, L., Wijayatunga, P., Verheul, M., Trouw, L., . . . Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S. (2016). Rheumatoid Factor Isotypes in Relation to Antibodies Against Citrullinated Peptides and Anti-Carbamylated Antibodies in Individuals Before the Onset of Rheumatoid Arthritis. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 18, Article ID 43.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rheumatoid Factor Isotypes in Relation to Antibodies Against Citrullinated Peptides and Anti-Carbamylated Antibodies in Individuals Before the Onset of Rheumatoid Arthritis
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2016 (English)In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 18, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The presence of rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against citrullinated protein and peptides (ACPA) precedes the onset of symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by several years. Relationships between the development of these antibodies are not obvious. 

Methods: Three isotypes [immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgG and IgM) of RF were analysed in 321 pre-symptomatic individuals who provided 598 samples collected a median of 6.2 (interquartile range 7.2) years before the onset of symptoms, and in 492 population control subjects. All samples were donated to the Biobank of Northern Sweden. RF isotypes were analysed using the EliA system (Phadia GmbH, Freiburg, Germany) with 96 % specificity according to receiver operating characteristic curves. Ten ACPA specificities were analysed using the ImmunoCAP ISAC system, and anti-CCP2 and anti-CarP antibodies were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. 

Results: The frequencies of RF isotypes in pre-symptomatic individuals were significantly increased compared with control subjects (p < 0.0001). In samples collected >= 15 years before the onset of symptoms, the IgA-RF isotype was significantly more prevalent than the most frequent ACPAs. Combinations of IgM- and IgA-RF isotypes with ACPA specificities [a-enolase (CEP-1/Eno(5-21))], fibrinogen (Fib)beta(36-52), Fiba(580-600), filaggrin (CCP-1/Fil(307-324)) and anti-CCP2 antibodies were associated with a significantly shorter time to onset of symptoms (p < 0.001-0.05). Using conditional inference tree analysis, anti-CCP2 in combination with anti-filaggrin antibodies gave the highest probability, 97.5 %, for disease development. 

Conclusions: RF isotypes predicted the development of RA, particularly in combination with ACPA, anti-CCP2 or anti-CarP antibodies. The highest probability for disease development was the presence of anti-CCP2 and anti-filaggrin antibodies.

Keyword
Rheumatoid arthritis, Rheumatoid factor, Anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies, Pre-symptomatic individuals, Anti-carbamylated protein antibodies, Anti-CCP2 antibodies
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102852 (URN)10.1186/s13075-016-0940-2 (DOI)000370007700002 ()26860413 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form, with the title "Rheumatoid Factor Isotypes in Relation to Antibodies Against Citrullinated Peptides and Anti-Carbamylated Antibodies in Individuals Before the Onset of Rheumatoid Arthritis"

Available from: 2015-05-07 Created: 2015-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
van Steenbergen, H. W., Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L., Berglin, E., Zhernakova, A., Knevel, R., Ivorra-Cortes, J., . . . van der Helm-van Mil, A. H. M. (2015). A genetic study on C5-TRAF1 and progression of joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 17, Article ID 1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A genetic study on C5-TRAF1 and progression of joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis
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2015 (English)In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 17, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The severity of joint damage progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is heritable. Several genetic variants have been identified, but together explain only part of the total genetic effect. Variants in Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-10 (IL-10), C5-TRAF1, and Fc-receptor-like-3 (FCRL3) have been described to associate with radiographic progression, but results of different studies were incongruent. We aimed to clarify associations of these variants with radiographic progression by evaluating six independent cohorts. Methods: In total 5,895 sets of radiographs of 2,493 RA-patients included in six different independent datasets from the Netherlands, Sweden, Spain and North-America were studied in relation to rs1800795 (IL-6), rs1800896 (IL-10), rs2900180 (C5-TRAF1) and rs7528684 (FCRL3). Associations were tested in the total RA-populations and in anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA)-positive and ACPA-negative subgroups per cohort, followed by meta-analyses. Furthermore, the associated region C5-TRAF1 was fine-mapped in the ACPA-negative Dutch RA-patients. Results: No associations were found for rs1800795 (IL-6), rs1800896 (IL-10) and rs7528684 (FCRL3) in the total RA-population and after stratification for ACPA. Rs2900180 in C5-TRAF1 was associated with radiographic progression in the ACPA-negative population (P-value meta-analysis = 5.85 x 10(-7)); the minor allele was associated with more radiographic progression. Fine-mapping revealed a region of 66Kb that was associated; the lowest P-value was for rs7021880 in TRAF1. The P-value for rs7021880 in meta-analysis was 6.35 x 10(-8). Previous studies indicate that the region of rs7021880 was associated with RNA expression of TRAF1 and C5. Conclusion: Variants in IL-6, IL-10 and FCRL3 were not associated with radiographic progression. Rs2900180 in C5-TRAF1 and linked variants in a 66Kb region were associated with radiographic progression in ACPA-negative RA.

National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102246 (URN)10.1186/s13075-014-0514-0 (DOI)000351569900001 ()25566937 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-02 Created: 2015-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Brink, M., Verheul, M. K., Rönnelid, J., Berglin, E., Holmdahl, R., Toes, R. E. M., . . . Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S. (2015). Anti-carbamylated protein antibodies in the pre-symptomatic phase of rheumatoid arthritis, their relationship with multiple anti-citrulline peptide antibodies and association with radiological damage. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 17, Article ID 25.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-carbamylated protein antibodies in the pre-symptomatic phase of rheumatoid arthritis, their relationship with multiple anti-citrulline peptide antibodies and association with radiological damage
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2015 (English)In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 17, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The presence of a new autoantibody system, anti-carbamylated protein (anti-CarP) antibodies, has been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The presence of anti-CarP antibodies was evaluated in samples taken from individuals who subsequently developed RA before and after onset of symptoms and related to previously analysed antibodies against citrullinated peptides (ACPA specificities) and anti-CCP2. Methods: A total of 252 individuals, with 423 samples from before onset of symptoms of RA, and 197 population controls were identified as donors to the Medical Biobank of Northern Sweden; 192 of them were also sampled at the time of diagnosis. All samples were analysed for anti-CarP IgG and anti-CCP2 antibodies using ELISAs. Ten different antibody reactivities against citrullinated antigens (ACPA specificities) were analysed using a custom-made microarray based on the ImmunoCAP ISAC system (Phadia). Results: The concentration of anti-CarP antibodies was significantly increased in the pre-symptomatic individuals compared with controls (P < 0.001) and also increased significantly after disease onset (P < 0.001). The sensitivity for anti-CarP antibodies in the pre-symptomatic individuals was 13.9% (95% CI: 11 to 17.6) and 42.2% (95% CI: 35.4 to 49.3) following development of RA. Anti-CarP antibody positivity was found in 5.1% to 13.3% of individuals negative for anti-CCP2 or ACPA specificities. Presence of anti-CarP antibodies was significantly related to radiological destruction at baseline, at 24 months and also to radiological change (P < 0.05, all). Conclusions: The results indicate that anti-CarP antibodies are associated with disease development, even after adjusting for the presence of different ACPA fine specificities, and in anti-CCP2 negative individuals and contribute to the identification of a subset of patients with worse radiological progression of the disease independent of ACPA.

National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102243 (URN)10.1186/s13075-015-0536-2 (DOI)000351576600001 ()
Available from: 2015-04-28 Created: 2015-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Kokkonen, H., Brink, M., Hansson, M., Lassen, E., Mathsson-Alm, L., Holmdahl, R., . . . Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S. (2015). Associations of antibodies against citrullinated peptides with human leukocyte antigen-shared epitope and smoking prior to the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 17, Article ID 125.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations of antibodies against citrullinated peptides with human leukocyte antigen-shared epitope and smoking prior to the development of rheumatoid arthritis
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2015 (English)In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 17, article id 125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: It has previously been shown that an increased number of antibodies against citrullinated peptides/proteins (ACPA) predate the onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Over time antibody positivity expands, involving more specific responses when approaching the onset of symptoms. We investigated the impact of human leukocyte antigen-shared epitope (HLA-SE) alleles and smoking on the development of ACPA, as well as in combination with ACPA during the state of quiescent autoimmunity (before the onset of symptoms), on the development of RA. Methods: Blood samples donated to the Medical Biobank of Northern Sweden from individuals prior to the onset of symptoms of RA (n = 370) and after onset (n = 203) and from population-based controls (n = 585) were used. Antibodies against 10 citrullinated peptides, fibrinogen (Fib alpha 561-583, alpha 580-600, beta 62-81a, beta 62-81b, beta 36-52), vimentin (Vim2-17, 60-75), filaggrin (CCP-1/Fil307-324),alpha-enolase (CEP-1/Eno5-21), collagen type II (citC1359-369), and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) 2 antibodies were analysed. Results: HLA-SE-positive individuals were more frequently positive for ACPA compared with HLA-SE-negative individuals prior to the onset of symptoms of RA, particularly for antibodies against CEP-1 and Fib beta 62-81a (72). Smoking was associated with antibodies against Vim2-17 and citC1359-369. HLA-SE and smoking showed increasing association to the presence of the antibodies closer to disease onset. The highest odds ratio (OR) for development of RA was for the combination of HLA-SE alleles and ACPA positivity, especially for antibodies against Fib beta 62-81b, CCP-1/Fil307-324, and Fib beta 36-52. A gene-environment additive interaction between smoking and HLA-SE alleles for the risk of disease development was found, with the highest OR for individuals positive for antibodies against Fib beta 36-52, CEP-1, and Fib alpha 580-600. Conclusions: The relationships between antibodies against the different ACPA specificities, HLA-SE, and smoking showed a variable pattern in individuals prior to the onset of RA. The combination of smoking and HLA-SE alleles was significantly associated with the development of some of the antibody specificities closer to onset of symptoms, and these associations remained significant at diagnosis. An additive gene-environment interaction was found for several of the antibodies for the development of RA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106129 (URN)10.1186/s13075-015-0638-x (DOI)000354850400001 ()25990747 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2013-52X-20307-07-3
Available from: 2015-07-14 Created: 2015-07-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Sundström, B., Johansson, I. & Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S. (2015). Diet and alcohol as risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis: a nested case-control study. Rheumatology International, 35(3), 533-539
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diet and alcohol as risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis: a nested case-control study
2015 (English)In: Rheumatology International, ISSN 0172-8172, E-ISSN 1437-160X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 533-539Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate whether alcohol and diet, assessed as both macronutrients and dietary patterns, increased the risk of development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through a nested case-control design in the Vasterbotten Intervention Program (VIP) cohort. Individuals in the VIP who had developed RA after the dietary survey were identified from medical records at the department of rheumatology at the University Hospital, UmeAyen (n = 386), and matched to 1,886 controls from the same database. Diet was assessed as food groups, as macronutrients and as scores of dietary patterns, namely the carbohydrate-restricted diet score, the Mediterranean diet score and the healthy diet indicator score. When analysing the dietary patterns, consumption of food groups and different macronutrients, a significant association was found in the highest tertile of carbohydrate-restricted diet among the cases with a subsequent anti-CCP-positive disease 1.40 (1.02-1.92), as well as in the highest tertile of protein consumption among smokers (OR = 1.80, 95 % CI 1.09-2.95). However, after additional adjustment for sodium intake, these associations were no longer statistically significant. No association was observed between alcohol consumption and the risk of RA. To summarize, there were no significant associations between diet, or alcohol consumption, and the risk of development of RA within this cohort. The lack of any significant associations of alcohol consumption may be explained by a low consumption in the studied population overall or alternatively by methodological issues raised recently.

Keyword
Rheumatoid arthritis, Epidemiology, Alcohol, Diet
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101388 (URN)10.1007/s00296-014-3185-x (DOI)000350035600019 ()25428595 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-07-07 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Kim, K., Bang, S.-Y., Lee, H.-S., Cho, S.-K., Choi, C.-B., Sung, Y.-K., . . . Bae, S.-C. (2015). High-density genotyping of immune loci in Koreans and Europeans identifies eight new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 74(3), Article ID e13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-density genotyping of immune loci in Koreans and Europeans identifies eight new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci
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2015 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 74, no 3, article id e13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective A highly polygenic aetiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. Methods We analysed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anticitrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data for a total sample size of 9299 Korean and 45 790 European case-control samples. Results We identified eight new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1-FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5x10(-8)), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the seven new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. Conclusions This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases.

National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100946 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204749 (DOI)000349422800024 ()24532676 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Sundström, B., Johansson, I. & Rantapää Dahlqvist, S. (2015). Interaction between dietary sodium and smoking increases the risk for rheumatoid arthritis: results from a nested case-control study. Rheumatology, 54(3), 487-493
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction between dietary sodium and smoking increases the risk for rheumatoid arthritis: results from a nested case-control study
2015 (English)In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 487-493Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Recent studies in animal models and on human cells have shown an effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on Th17 cells promoting inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of NaCl intake on the risk of development of RA.

METHODS: A nested case-control study was performed using population-based prospective data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme. The study included 386 individuals who had stated their dietary habits as part of a community intervention programme a median of 7.7 years before the onset of symptoms of RA. For comparison, 1886 matched controls were identified from the same database and co-analysed.

RESULTS: No significant association was found between sodium intake and the development of RA when all of the individuals were included. In analyses stratified for smoking status at the time of the examination, sodium intake more than doubled the risk for RA among smokers [odds ratio (OR) 2.26 (95% CI 1.06, 4.81)]. This was not observed among non-smokers. Additive interaction analysis of smoking and cases with the highest tertile of sodium intake revealed that 54% of the increased risk of developing RA from these exposures was due to interaction between them [attributable proportion 0.54 (95% CI 0.26, 0.82)]. The risk was further increased for the development of anti-CCP-positive and/or HLA shared epitope-positive RA.

CONCLUSION: Although we were unable to confirm our stated hypothesis, our results that high sodium consumption among smokers was associated with the risk of RA may provide new insights into the impact of smoking in RA development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015
Keyword
rheumatoid arthritis, diet, smoking
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Research subject
Medicine, rheumatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95202 (URN)10.1093/rheumatology/keu330 (DOI)000352540900017 ()
Available from: 2014-10-23 Created: 2014-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Innala, L., Berglin, E., Möller, B., Ljung, L., Smedby, T., Södergren, A., . . . Wållberg-Jonsson, S. (2014). Age at onset determines severity and choice of treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective study. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 16(2), R94
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age at onset determines severity and choice of treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective study
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2014 (English)In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 16, no 2, p. R94-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Disease activity, severity and co-morbidity contribute to increased mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the impact of age at disease onset on prognostic risk factors and treatment in early disease.

METHODS: In this study, 950 RA patients were followed regularly from inclusion (<12 months from symptom onset) for disease activity (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), tender/swollen joints, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain/global, disease activity score (DAS28)) and function (health assessment questionnaire (HAQ)). Disease severity, measured by radiographs of hands/feet (erosions, Larsen score), extra-articular disease, nodules and co-morbidities and treatment (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), corticosteroids, biologics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)) were recorded at inclusion and after 5 years. Autoantibodies (rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (ACPA)) and genetic markers (human leukocyte antibody (HLA)-shared epitope, protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22)) were analyzed at inclusion. Data were stratified as young (YORA) and late (LORA) onset RA, defined as being below/above median age (58 years) at onset.

RESULTS: LORA was associated with lower frequency of ACPA (P <0.05) and carriage of PTPN22-T variant (P <0.01), but with greater disease activity at inclusion measured as ESR (P < 0.001), CRP (P <0.01) and accumulated disease activity (area under the curve for DAS28) at 6 (P <0.01), 12 (P <0.01) and 24 months (P <0.05), and a higher HAQ score (P <0.01) compared with YORA. At baseline and 24 months, LORA was more often associated with erosions (P <0.01 for both) and a higher Larsen score (P <0.001 for both). LORA was more often treated with corticosteroids (P <0.01), less often with methotrexate (P <0.001) and biologics (P <0.001). YORA was more often associated with early DMARD treatment (P <0.001). Multiple regression analyses supported our findings regarding impact of age on chosen treatment.

CONCLUSION: YORA patients were more frequently ACPA-positive. LORA was more often associated with erosions, higher Larsen scores, disease activity and HAQ at baseline. Nevertheless, YORA was treated earlier with DMARDs, whilst LORA was more often treated with corticosteroids and with less DMARDs in early disease. This could have implications for development of co-morbidities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-88497 (URN)10.1186/ar4540 (DOI)000338993100047 ()24731866 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-05-07 Created: 2014-05-07 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Brink, M., Verheul, M. K., Ronnelid, J., Toes, R. E., Klareskog, L., Trouw, L. L. & Rantapää Dahlqvist, S. (2014). Anti-carbamylated protein antibodies precede the onset of symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis in a Swedish biobank cohort. Paper presented at 15th Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), JUN 11-14, 2014, Paris, FRANCE. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 73, 397-398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-carbamylated protein antibodies precede the onset of symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis in a Swedish biobank cohort
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2014 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 73, p. 397-398Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106396 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-eular.4530 (DOI)000346919802150 ()
Conference
15th Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), JUN 11-14, 2014, Paris, FRANCE
Note

Supplement: 2, Meeting Abstract: FRI0046

Available from: 2015-07-14 Created: 2015-07-14 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Brink, M., Ärlestig, L., Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S. & Lejon, K. (2014). B Regulatory Cells are Functionally Impaired in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and in Their First-Degree Relatives Compared with Controls. Paper presented at 42nd Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), JUN 11-14, 2014, Reykjavik, ICELAND. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, 79(6), 450-450
Open this publication in new window or tab >>B Regulatory Cells are Functionally Impaired in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and in Their First-Degree Relatives Compared with Controls
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 450-450Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91213 (URN)000337588500070 ()
Conference
42nd Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), JUN 11-14, 2014, Reykjavik, ICELAND
Available from: 2014-07-21 Created: 2014-07-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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