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Brodin, Tomas
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Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Heynen, M., Fick, J., Jonsson, M., Klaminder, J. & Brodin, T. (2016). Effect of bioconcentration and trophic transfer on realized exposure to oxazepam in 2 predators, the dragonfly larvae (Aeshna grandis) and the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis). Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 35(4), 930-937.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of bioconcentration and trophic transfer on realized exposure to oxazepam in 2 predators, the dragonfly larvae (Aeshna grandis) and the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis)
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2016 (English)In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 35, no 4, 930-937 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychoactive substances are used worldwide and constitute one of the most common groups of pharmaceutical contaminants in surface waters. Although these pharmaceuticals are designed to be efficiently eliminated from the human body, very little is known about their trophic-transfer potential in aquatic wildlife. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to quantify and compare uptake of an anxiolytic (oxazepam) from water (bioconcentration) and via the consumption of contaminated diet (trophic transfer) in 2 common freshwater predators: Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and the dragonfly larvae Aeshna grandis. Bioconcentration and trophic transfer of oxazepam were found in both predator species. However, higher bioconcentrations were observed for perch (bioconcentration factor [BCF], 3.7) than for dragonfly larvae (BCF, 0.5). Perch also retained more oxazepam from consumed prey (41%) than dragonfly larvae (10%), whereas the relative contribution via prey consumption was 14% and 42% for perch and dragonflies, respectively. In addition, bioconcentration was negatively correlated with perch weight, indicating that exposure levels in natural contaminated environments differ between individuals of different size or between different developmental stages. Hence, trophic transfer of pharmaceuticals may indeed occur, and estimates of environmental exposures that do not consider intake via food or size-dependent bioconcentration may therefore lead to wrongful estimations of realized exposure levels in natural contaminated ecosystems. (C) 2016 SETAC

Keyword
Benzodiazepine, Pharmaceutical pollution, Trophic transfer, Perca fluviatilis, Dragonfly larvae, Bioconcentration
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119268 (URN)10.1002/etc.3368 (DOI)000372490300019 ()26762222 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-02 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Hellström, G., Klaminder, J., Jonsson, M., Fick, J. & Brodin, T. (2016). Upscaling behavioural studies to the field using acoustic telemetry. Aquatic Toxicology, 170, 384-389.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upscaling behavioural studies to the field using acoustic telemetry
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2016 (English)In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 170, 384-389 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Laboratory-based behavioural assays are often used in ecotoxicological studies to assess the environmental risk of aquatic contaminants. While results from such laboratory-based risk assessments may be difficult to extrapolate to natural environments, technological advancements over the past decade now make it possible to perform risk assessments through detailed studies of exposed individuals in natural settings. Acoustic telemetry is a technology to monitor movement and behaviour of aquatic organism in oceans, lakes, and rivers. The technology allows for tracking of multiple individuals simultaneously with very high temporal and spatial resolution, with the option to incorporate sensors to measure various physiological and environmental parameters. Although frequently used in fisheries research, aquatic ecotoxicology has been slow to adopt acoustic telemetry as a tool in field-based studies. This mini-review intends to introduce acoustic telemetry to aquatic ecotoxicologists, focusing on the potential of the technology to bridge the gap between laboratory assays and natural behaviours when making toxicological risk assessments.

Keyword
Aquatic ecotoxicology, Acoustic telemetry, Behaviour, Biomarker, Monitoring
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-116754 (URN)10.1016/j.aquatox.2015.11.005 (DOI)000368564500042 ()26683267 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-19 Created: 2016-02-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Thorlacius, M., Hellström, G. & Brodin, T. (2015). Behavioral dependent dispersal in the invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus depends on population age. Current Zoology, 61(3), 529-542.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral dependent dispersal in the invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus depends on population age
2015 (English)In: Current Zoology, ISSN 1674-5507, Vol. 61, no 3, 529-542 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biological invasions cause major ecological and economic costs in invaded habitats. The round goby Neogobius melanostomus is a successful invasive species and a major threat to the biodiversity and ecological function of the Baltic Sea. It is native to the Ponto-Caspian region and has, via ballast water transport of ships, invaded the Gulf of Gdansk in Poland. Since 1990, it has spread as far north as Raahe in Northern Finland (64 degrees 41'04"N, 24 degrees 28'44"E). Over the past decade, consistent individual differences of behavioral expressions have been shown to explain various ecological processes such as dispersal, survival or reproduction. We have previously shown that new and old populations differ in personality trait expression. Individuals in new populations are bolder, less sociable and more active than in old populations. Here we investigate if the behavioral differentiation can be explained by phenotype-dependent dispersal. This was investigated by measuring activity, boldness and sociability of individually marked gobies, and subsequently allowing them to disperse in a system composed of five consecutive tanks connected by tubes. Individual dispersal tendency and distance was measured. Our results revealed that in newly established populations, more active individuals disperse sooner and that latency of a group to disperse depends on the mean sociability of the group. This indicates the presence of personality dependent dispersal in this species and that it is maintained at the invasion front but lost as the populations get older.

Keyword
Personality, Activity, Dispersal, Round goby, Neogobius melanostomus, Species invasions
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106570 (URN)000356968400015 ()
Available from: 2015-07-20 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Drotz, M. K., Brodin, T. & Nilsson, A. N. (2015). Changing Names with Changed Address: Integrated Taxonomy and Species Delimitation in the Holarctic Colymbetes paykulli Group (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). PLoS ONE, 10(11), Article ID e0143577.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing Names with Changed Address: Integrated Taxonomy and Species Delimitation in the Holarctic Colymbetes paykulli Group (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 11, e0143577Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Species delimitation of geographically isolated forms is a long-standing problem in less studied insect groups. Often taxonomic decisions are based directly on morphologic variation, and lack a discussion regarding sample size and the efficiency of migration barriers or dispersal/migration capacity of the studied species. These problems are here exemplified in a water beetle complex from the Bering Sea region that separates North America from Eurasia. Only a few sampled specimens occur from this particular area and they are mostly found in museum and private collections. Here we utilize the theory of integrated taxonomy to discuss the speciation of the Holarctic Colymbetes paykulli water beetle complex, which historically has included up to five species of which today only two are recognized. Three delimitation methods are used; landmark based morphometry of body shape, variation in reticulation patterns of the pronotum exo-skeleton and sequence variation of the partial mitochondrial gene Cyt b. Our conclusion is that the Palearctic and Nearctic populations of C. paykulli are given the status of separate species, based on the fact that all methods showed significant separation between populations. As a consequence the name of the Palearctic species is C. paykulli Erichson and the Nearctic species should be known as C. longulus LeConte. There is no clear support for delineation between Palearctic and Nearctic populations of C. dahuricus based on mtDNA. However, significant difference in size and reticulation patterns from the two regions is shown. The combined conclusion is that the C. dahuricus complex needs a more thorough investigation to fully disentangle its taxonomic status. Therefore it is here still regarded as a Holarctic species. This study highlights the importance to study several diagnosable characters that has the potential to discriminate evolutionary lineage during speciation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public library science, 2015
National Category
Ecology Evolutionary Biology Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113730 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0143577 (DOI)000365889800050 ()
Available from: 2015-12-30 Created: 2015-12-28 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Ershammar, E., Fick, J., Brodin, T. & Klaminder, J. (2015). Effects of an antihistamine on carbon and nutrient recycling in streams. Science of the Total Environment, 538, 240-245.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of an antihistamine on carbon and nutrient recycling in streams
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2015 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 538, 240-245 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In stream ecosystems, microbes and macroinvertebrates consume leaf litter deposited from the riparian vegetation, and thereby recycle resources tied up in the litter. Several environmental variables influence rates of this recycling, but it is not well known if common pharmaceuticals, such as antihistamines, originating from waste-water effluent, have additional impacts. Exposure to dilute concentrations of antihistamines may adversely influence aquatic detritivorous invertebrates, because invertebrates use histamines for neurotransmission, resulting in hampered recycling of resource tied up in leaf detritus. In this study, we therefore investigated if the antihistamine fexofenadine, at a concentration of 2000 ng l(-1), alters rates of leaf litter decomposition in stream microcosms. Stonefly larvae (n = 10, per microcosm), together with natural microbial communities, served as main decomposer organisms on alder leaf litter. First, we used 30 microcosms containing fexofenadine, while the other 30 served as non-contaminated controls, and of each 30 microcosms, 14 contained stonefly larvae and microbes, while the remaining 16 contained only microbes. We found, in contrast to our hypothesis, that fexofenadine had no effect on leaf litter decomposition via impacts on the stonefly larvae. However, independent on if stoneflies were present or not, concentrations of organic carbon (TOC) and nitrogen (N) were strongly affected, with 20-26 and 24-31% lower concentrations of TOC and N, respectively, in the presence of fexofenadine. Second, in a scaled down follow-up experiment we found that microbial activity increased by 85%, resulting in a 10% decrease in pH, in the presence of fexofenadine. While the antihistamine concentration we used is higher than those thus far found in the field (1-10 ng l(-1)), it is still 100 times lower than the predicted no-effect concentration for fexofenadine. As such, our results indicate that low mu g l(-1) levels of antihistamines can have an effect on carbon and nutrient recycling in aquatic system. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keyword
Aquatic insects, TOC, Fexofenadine, Nitrogen, Pharmaceuticals, Stonefly
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111457 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.08.061 (DOI)000363348900024 ()26311580 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Klaminder, J., Brodin, T., Sundelin, A., Anderson, N. J., Fahlman, J., Jonsson, M. & Fick, J. (2015). Long-Term Persistence of an Anxiolytic Drug (Oxazepam) in a Large Freshwater Lake. Environmental Science and Technology, 49(17), 10406-10412.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Persistence of an Anxiolytic Drug (Oxazepam) in a Large Freshwater Lake
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2015 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 49, no 17, 10406-10412 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Production and human consumption of pharmaceuticals result in contamination of surface waters worldwide. Little is known about the long-term (i.e., over decades) fate of pharmaceuticals in aquatic systems. Here, we show that the most prescribed anxiolytic in Sweden (oxazepam) persists in its therapeutic form for several decades after being deposited in a large freshwater lake. By comparing sediment cores collected in 1995 and 2013, we demonstrate that oxazepam inputs from the early 1970s remained in the sediments until sampling in 2013, despite in situ degradation processes and sediment diagenesis. In laboratory and pond experiments, we further reveal that therapeutic forms of oxazepam can persist over several months in cold (5 degrees C) lake water free from UV light. We conclude that oxazepam can persist in lakes over a time scale much longer than previously realized and that levels can build up in lakes due to both a legacy of past inputs and a growing urban population.

Keyword
pharmaceuticals, environment, waste-water, pharmaceuticals
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109802 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.5b01968 (DOI)000360773600017 ()26196259 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-08 Created: 2015-10-06 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Eggermont, H., Balian, E., Azevedo, J. M., Beumer, V., Brodin, T., Claudet, J., . . . Le Roux, X. (2015). Nature-based Solutions: New Influence for Environmental Management and Research in Europe. GAIA, 24(4), 243-248.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nature-based Solutions: New Influence for Environmental Management and Research in Europe
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2015 (English)In: GAIA, ISSN 0940-5550, Vol. 24, no 4, 243-248 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Greening roofs or walls to cool down city areas during summer, to capture storm water, to abate pollution, and to increase human well-being while enhancing biodiversity: nature-based solutions (NBS) refer to the sustainable management and use of nature for tackling societal challenges. Building on and complementing traditional biodiversity conservation and management strategies, NBS integrate science, policy, and practice and create biodiversity benefits in terms of diverse, well-managed ecosystems.

Keyword
biodiversity, ecosystem services, research programming, social-ecological systems, societal allenges, sustainable management
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-116116 (URN)10.14512/gaia.24.4.9 (DOI)000368213400007 ()
Available from: 2016-02-08 Created: 2016-02-08 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Fick, J., Klaminder, J. & Brodin, T. (2014). Antihistamines and aquatic insects: Bioconcentration and impacts on behavior in damselfly larvae (Zygoptera). Science of the Total Environment, 472, 108-111.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antihistamines and aquatic insects: Bioconcentration and impacts on behavior in damselfly larvae (Zygoptera)
2014 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 472, 108-111 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Because aquatic insects use histamines as neurotransmitters, adverse impacts on aquatic insects living in aquatic environments that receive antihistamines with wastewater effluent are plausible. In this study, we exposed damselfly larvae to low concentrations of two commonly used antihistamines (Hydroxyzine and Fexofenadine, 360 +/- 42 and 2200 +/- 43 ng 1(-1), respectively), and recorded damselfly larvae behavior before and after exposure. Further, after the second set of behavioral assays was performed, we quantified bioconcentration of the antihistamines in the damselfly bodies. Our results showed significant changes in damselfly behavior following antihistamine exposure. After Hydroxyzine exposure, the damselfly larvae became less active, and they showed reduced fleeing response (i.e. increased boldness) after being exposed to Fexofenadine, the latter also being significantly different from the non-exposed (control) individuals. Further, we found high levels of bioconcentration in the damselflies; Hydroxyzine showed an average bioconcentration factor (BCF) of 2000. As such, our results indicate that low concentrations of antihistamines can have sub-lethal effects on aquatic insects manifested as behavioral changes, and that bioconcentration of these substances can be high. Therefore, the need to investigate the impact of emergent aquatic contaminants also on aquatic insects, and on behaviors that are of ecological importance, is further highlighted. (c) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keyword
Antihistamines, Aquatic insects, Behavior, Bioconcentration, Damselfly, Pharmaceuticals
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Ecology Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87409 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.10.104 (DOI)000331916100014 ()
Available from: 2014-04-01 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Brodin, T., Piovano, S., Fick, J., Klaminder, J., Heynen, M. & Jonsson, M. (2014). Ecological effects of pharmaceuticals in aquatic systems-impacts through behavioural alterations. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 369(1656), 20130580.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecological effects of pharmaceuticals in aquatic systems-impacts through behavioural alterations
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2014 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 369, no 1656, 20130580- p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study of animal behaviour is important for both ecology and ecotoxicology, yet research in these two fields is currently developing independently. Here, we synthesize the available knowledge on drug-induced behavioural alterations in fish, discuss potential ecological consequences and report results from an experiment in which we quantify both uptake and behavioural impact of a psychiatric drug on a predatory fish (Perca fluviatilis) and its invertebrate prey (Coenagrion hastulatum). We show that perch became more active while damselfly behaviour was unaffected, illustrating that behavioural effects of pharmaceuticals can differ between species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that prey consumption can be an important exposure route as on average 46% of the pharmaceutical in ingested prey accumulated in the predator. This suggests that investigations of exposure through bioconcentration, where trophic interactions and subsequent bioaccumulation of exposed individuals are ignored, underestimate exposure. Wildlife may therefore be exposed to higher levels of behaviourally altering pharmaceuticals than predictions based on commonly used exposure assays and pharmaceutical concentrations found in environmental monitoring programmes.

Keyword
benzodiazepines, bioconcentration, contaminants, behaviour, ecological effects, Perca fluviatilis
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96602 (URN)10.1098/rstb.2013.0580 (DOI)000343114500010 ()
Available from: 2014-11-28 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Brodin, T. & Drotz, M. K. (2014). Individual variation in dispersal associated behavioral traits of the invasive Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis, H. Milne Edwards, 1854) during initial invasion of Lake Vänern, Sweden. Current Zoology, 60(3), 410-416.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual variation in dispersal associated behavioral traits of the invasive Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis, H. Milne Edwards, 1854) during initial invasion of Lake Vänern, Sweden
2014 (English)In: Current Zoology, ISSN 1674-5507, Vol. 60, no 3, 410-416 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding and predicting species range-expansions and biological invasions is an important challenge in modern ecology because of rapidly changing environments. Recent studies have revealed that consistent within-species variation in behavior (i.e. animal personality) can be imperative for dispersal success, a key stage in the invasion process. Here we investigate the composition and correlation of two important personality traits associated with invasion success, activity and boldness, and how they are connected to sex and individual size in a newly colonised population of the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis in Lake Vanern, Sweden. We found no effect of sex or size on behavioral expressions of E. sinensis but a clear positive correlation between boldness and activity. In addition, this study generates important baseline data for monitoring behavioral development, and thereby changing ecological impact, of an invading population over time. This has implications for predicting ecological effects of invasive species as well as for managing ecological invasions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2014
Keyword
Eriocheir sinensis, Biological invasion, Behavior, Boldness, Activity, Invasion front
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91381 (URN)000338119400012 ()
Available from: 2014-08-05 Created: 2014-08-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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