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Brodin, Tomas
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Thorlacius, M., Hellström, G. & Brodin, T. (2015). Behavioral dependent dispersal in the invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus depends on population age. Current Zoology, 61(3), 529-542
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral dependent dispersal in the invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus depends on population age
2015 (English)In: Current Zoology, ISSN 1674-5507, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 529-542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biological invasions cause major ecological and economic costs in invaded habitats. The round goby Neogobius melanostomus is a successful invasive species and a major threat to the biodiversity and ecological function of the Baltic Sea. It is native to the Ponto-Caspian region and has, via ballast water transport of ships, invaded the Gulf of Gdansk in Poland. Since 1990, it has spread as far north as Raahe in Northern Finland (64 degrees 41'04"N, 24 degrees 28'44"E). Over the past decade, consistent individual differences of behavioral expressions have been shown to explain various ecological processes such as dispersal, survival or reproduction. We have previously shown that new and old populations differ in personality trait expression. Individuals in new populations are bolder, less sociable and more active than in old populations. Here we investigate if the behavioral differentiation can be explained by phenotype-dependent dispersal. This was investigated by measuring activity, boldness and sociability of individually marked gobies, and subsequently allowing them to disperse in a system composed of five consecutive tanks connected by tubes. Individual dispersal tendency and distance was measured. Our results revealed that in newly established populations, more active individuals disperse sooner and that latency of a group to disperse depends on the mean sociability of the group. This indicates the presence of personality dependent dispersal in this species and that it is maintained at the invasion front but lost as the populations get older.

Keyword
Personality, Activity, Dispersal, Round goby, Neogobius melanostomus, Species invasions
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106570 (URN)000356968400015 ()
Available from: 2015-07-20 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Fick, J., Klaminder, J. & Brodin, T. (2014). Antihistamines and aquatic insects: Bioconcentration and impacts on behavior in damselfly larvae (Zygoptera). Science of the Total Environment, 472, 108-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antihistamines and aquatic insects: Bioconcentration and impacts on behavior in damselfly larvae (Zygoptera)
2014 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 472, p. 108-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Because aquatic insects use histamines as neurotransmitters, adverse impacts on aquatic insects living in aquatic environments that receive antihistamines with wastewater effluent are plausible. In this study, we exposed damselfly larvae to low concentrations of two commonly used antihistamines (Hydroxyzine and Fexofenadine, 360 +/- 42 and 2200 +/- 43 ng 1(-1), respectively), and recorded damselfly larvae behavior before and after exposure. Further, after the second set of behavioral assays was performed, we quantified bioconcentration of the antihistamines in the damselfly bodies. Our results showed significant changes in damselfly behavior following antihistamine exposure. After Hydroxyzine exposure, the damselfly larvae became less active, and they showed reduced fleeing response (i.e. increased boldness) after being exposed to Fexofenadine, the latter also being significantly different from the non-exposed (control) individuals. Further, we found high levels of bioconcentration in the damselflies; Hydroxyzine showed an average bioconcentration factor (BCF) of 2000. As such, our results indicate that low concentrations of antihistamines can have sub-lethal effects on aquatic insects manifested as behavioral changes, and that bioconcentration of these substances can be high. Therefore, the need to investigate the impact of emergent aquatic contaminants also on aquatic insects, and on behaviors that are of ecological importance, is further highlighted. (c) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keyword
Antihistamines, Aquatic insects, Behavior, Bioconcentration, Damselfly, Pharmaceuticals
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Ecology Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87409 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.10.104 (DOI)000331916100014 ()
Available from: 2014-04-01 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Brodin, T., Piovano, S., Fick, J., Klaminder, J., Heynen, M. & Jonsson, M. (2014). Ecological effects of pharmaceuticals in aquatic systems-impacts through behavioural alterations. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 369(1656), 20130580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecological effects of pharmaceuticals in aquatic systems-impacts through behavioural alterations
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2014 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 369, no 1656, p. 20130580-Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study of animal behaviour is important for both ecology and ecotoxicology, yet research in these two fields is currently developing independently. Here, we synthesize the available knowledge on drug-induced behavioural alterations in fish, discuss potential ecological consequences and report results from an experiment in which we quantify both uptake and behavioural impact of a psychiatric drug on a predatory fish (Perca fluviatilis) and its invertebrate prey (Coenagrion hastulatum). We show that perch became more active while damselfly behaviour was unaffected, illustrating that behavioural effects of pharmaceuticals can differ between species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that prey consumption can be an important exposure route as on average 46% of the pharmaceutical in ingested prey accumulated in the predator. This suggests that investigations of exposure through bioconcentration, where trophic interactions and subsequent bioaccumulation of exposed individuals are ignored, underestimate exposure. Wildlife may therefore be exposed to higher levels of behaviourally altering pharmaceuticals than predictions based on commonly used exposure assays and pharmaceutical concentrations found in environmental monitoring programmes.

Keyword
benzodiazepines, bioconcentration, contaminants, behaviour, ecological effects, Perca fluviatilis
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96602 (URN)10.1098/rstb.2013.0580 (DOI)000343114500010 ()
Available from: 2014-11-28 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Brodin, T. & Drotz, M. K. (2014). Individual variation in dispersal associated behavioral traits of the invasive Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis, H. Milne Edwards, 1854) during initial invasion of Lake Vänern, Sweden. Current Zoology, 60(3), 410-416
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual variation in dispersal associated behavioral traits of the invasive Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis, H. Milne Edwards, 1854) during initial invasion of Lake Vänern, Sweden
2014 (English)In: Current Zoology, ISSN 1674-5507, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 410-416Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding and predicting species range-expansions and biological invasions is an important challenge in modern ecology because of rapidly changing environments. Recent studies have revealed that consistent within-species variation in behavior (i.e. animal personality) can be imperative for dispersal success, a key stage in the invasion process. Here we investigate the composition and correlation of two important personality traits associated with invasion success, activity and boldness, and how they are connected to sex and individual size in a newly colonised population of the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis in Lake Vanern, Sweden. We found no effect of sex or size on behavioral expressions of E. sinensis but a clear positive correlation between boldness and activity. In addition, this study generates important baseline data for monitoring behavioral development, and thereby changing ecological impact, of an invading population over time. This has implications for predicting ecological effects of invasive species as well as for managing ecological invasions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2014
Keyword
Eriocheir sinensis, Biological invasion, Behavior, Boldness, Activity, Invasion front
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91381 (URN)000338119400012 ()
Available from: 2014-08-05 Created: 2014-08-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Klaminder, J., Jonsson, M., Fick, J., Sundelin, A. & Brodin, T. (2014). The conceptual imperfection of aquatic risk assessment tests: highlighting the need for tests designed to detect therapeutic effects of pharmaceutical contaminants. Environmental Research Letters, 9(8), 084003
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The conceptual imperfection of aquatic risk assessment tests: highlighting the need for tests designed to detect therapeutic effects of pharmaceutical contaminants
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2014 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 084003-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Standardized ecotoxicological tests still constitute the fundamental tools when doing risk-assessment of aquatic contaminants. These protocols are managed towards minimal mortality in the controls, which is not representative for natural systems where mortality is often high. This methodological bias, generated from assays where mortality in the control group is systematically disregarded, makes it difficult to measure therapeutic effects of pharmaceutical contaminants leading to lower mortality. This is of concern considering that such effects on exposed organisms still may have substantial ecological consequences. In this paper, we illustrate this conceptual problem by presenting empirical data for how the therapeutic effect of Oxazepam-a common contaminant of surface waters-lower mortality rates among exposed Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) from wild populations, at two different life stages. We found that fry hatched from roe that had been exposed to dilute concentrations (1.1 +/- 0.3 mu g l(-1)) of Oxazepam for 24 h 3-6 days prior to hatching showed lower mortality rates and increased activity 30 days after hatching. Similar effects, i.e. increased activity and lower mortality rates were also observed for 2-year old perch exposed to dilute Oxazepam concentrations (1.2 +/- 0.4 mu g l(-1)). We conclude that therapeutic effects from pharmaceutical contaminants need to be considered in risk assessment assays to avoid that important ecological effects from aquatic contaminants are systematically missed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2014
Keyword
risk assessment, therapeutic effects, Eurasian perch, benzodiazepines, contamination, ecotoxicology
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Ecology Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94930 (URN)10.1088/1748-9326/9/8/084003 (DOI)000341966400004 ()
Available from: 2014-11-10 Created: 2014-10-20 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Brodin, T., Fick, J., Jonsson, M. & Klaminder, J. (2013). Dilute concentrations of a psychiatric drug alter behavior of fish from natural populations. Science, 339(6121), 814-815
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dilute concentrations of a psychiatric drug alter behavior of fish from natural populations
2013 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 339, no 6121, p. 814-815Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental pollution by pharmaceuticals is increasingly recognized as a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. A variety of pharmaceuticals enter waterways by way of treated wastewater effluents and remain biochemically active in aquatic systems. Several ecotoxicological studies have been done, but generally, little is known about the ecological effects of pharmaceuticals. Here we show that a benzodiazepine anxiolytic drug (oxazepam) alters behavior and feeding rate of wild European perch (Perca fluviatilis) at concentrations encountered in effluent-influenced surface waters. Individuals exposed to water with dilute drug concentrations (1.8 micrograms liter–1) exhibited increased activity, reduced sociality, and higher feeding rate. As such, our results show that anxiolytic drugs in surface waters alter animal behaviors that are known to have ecological and evolutionary consequences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2013
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-66134 (URN)10.1126/science.1226850 (DOI)000314874400047 ()23413353 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-02-15 Created: 2013-02-15 Last updated: 2018-01-15Bibliographically approved
Brodin, T. (2013). Drugs cause fishy behavior. TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, 45, pp. IX-IX
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drugs cause fishy behavior
2013 (English)In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 45, p. IX-IXArticle in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71321 (URN)10.1016/j.trac.2013.02.001 (DOI)000317882200005 ()
Available from: 2013-05-28 Created: 2013-05-26 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Brodin, T., Lind, M. I., Wiberg, M. K. & Johansson, F. (2013). Personality trait differences between mainland and island populations in the common frog (Rana temporaria). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 67(1), 135-143
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personality trait differences between mainland and island populations in the common frog (Rana temporaria)
2013 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 135-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding and predicting species range expansions is an important challenge in modern ecology because of rapidly changing environments. Recent studies have revealed that consistent within-species variation in behavior (i.e., animal personality) can be imperative for dispersal success, a key process in range expansion. Here we investigate how habitat isolation can mediate differentiation of personality traits between recently founded island populations and the main population. We performed laboratory studies of boldness and exploration across life stages (tadpoles and froglets) using four isolated island populations and four mainland populations of the common frog (Rana temporaria). Both tadpoles and froglets from isolated populations were bolder and more exploratory than conspecifics from the mainland. Although the pattern can be influenced by possible differences in predation pressure, we suggest that this behavioral differentiation might be the result of a disperser-dependent founder effect brought on by an isolation-driven environmental filtering of animal personalities. These findings can have important implications for both species persistence in the face of climate change (i.e., range expansions) and ecological invasions as well as for explaining rapid speciation in isolated patches.

Keyword
Range expansion, Animal personality, Colonization, Dispersal, Boldness
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-64942 (URN)10.1007/s00265-012-1433-1 (DOI)000313060500013 ()
Available from: 2013-02-25 Created: 2013-02-04 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Cote, J., Fogarty, S., Tymen, B., Sih, A. & Brodin, T. (2013). Personality-dependent dispersal cancelled under predation risk. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 280(1773), 20132349
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personality-dependent dispersal cancelled under predation risk
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2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 280, no 1773, p. 20132349-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dispersal is a fundamental life-history trait for many ecological processes. Recent studies suggest that dispersers, in comparison to residents, display various phenotypic specializations increasing their dispersal inclination or success. Among them, dispersers are believed to be consistently more bold, exploratory, asocial or aggressive than residents. These links between behavioural types and dispersal should vary with the cause of dispersal. However, with the exception of one study, personality-dependent dispersal has not been studied in contrasting environments. Here, we used mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) to test whether personality-dependent dispersal varies with predation risk, a factor that should induce boldness or sociability-dependent dispersal. Corroborating previous studies, we found that dispersing mosquitofish are less social than non-dispersing fish when there was no predation risk. However, personality-dependent dispersal is negated under predation risk, dispersers having similar personality types to residents. Our results suggest that adaptive dispersal decisions could commonly depend on interactions between phenotypes and ecological contexts.

Keyword
behavioural syndrome, behavioural type, boldness, ecological invasion, predator-prey interaction, sociability
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-83671 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2013.2349 (DOI)000330325600015 ()24197414 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-12-03 Created: 2013-12-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Drotz, M. K., Brodin, T. & Berggren, M. (2012). Distribution patterns of the Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne Edwards, 1853) in Lake Vanern, Sweden. AQUAT INVASIONS, 7(2), 243-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distribution patterns of the Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne Edwards, 1853) in Lake Vanern, Sweden
2012 (English)In: AQUAT INVASIONS, ISSN 1798-6540, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 243-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The catadromous Chinese mitten crab (CMC), Eriocheir sinensis is well known for its extensive invasion routes across the world. However, little is known about both adult and juvenile behaviour after they arrive to a new region. Particularly if the CMC has utilised freight ship ballast tanks as its invasion vector to new freshwater areas like coastal connected larger lakes. The Swedish Lake Vanern, Europe's third largest freshwater lake, offers a suitable study area since only a handful of CMC had been reported between its first record in 1954 and 2004. Hence, the increased catch of of CMC in the mid 2000s was unexpected and provided a rare opportunity to study the initial phase of a biological invasion. Fortunately local fishermen have traditionally, since the mid 1970s, utilised large stationary fish trap nets, evenly distributed from the inlet to the harbour of Lidkoping outward into the main part of the lake. During the peak occurrence in 2005 the traps captured CMC frequently for 90 days starting on August 10. Daily catch increased from September 19th to October 17th. Thereafter the number decreased until November 7th when the last crab was captured. Only one crab out of the 21 caught in the two traps furthest away from the harbour inlet was caught before September 19th. The number of caught CMC differed significantly between the trap nets. Almost half (48.4 %) of all CMC were caught in the two traps closest to the harbour inlet and 41.9% in the second trap-line, consisting of two traps 6 km from the harbour inlet. The remaining crabs were caught in the traps furthest away. Catch pattern from this unique invasion event is discussed in relation to CMC dispersal/migration, invading sample size, behavioural traits and catch efficiency of traps.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
REGIONAL EURO-ASIAN BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS CENTRE-REABIC, PL 3, HELSINKI, 00981, FINLAND, 2012
Keyword
freshwater, initial invasion, behavior, catch pattern
National Category
Ecology Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-57613 (URN)10.3391/ai.2012.7.2.010 (DOI)000306278500010 ()
Available from: 2012-08-08 Created: 2012-08-08 Last updated: 2012-08-08Bibliographically approved
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