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Eriksson, M. & Ng, N. (2015). Changes in access to structural social capital and its influence on self-rated health over time for middle-aged men and women: a longitudinal study from northern Sweden.. Social Science and Medicine, 130, 250-258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in access to structural social capital and its influence on self-rated health over time for middle-aged men and women: a longitudinal study from northern Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 130, p. 250-258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Until recently, most studies on social capital and health have been cross-sectional making it difficult to draw causal conclusions. This longitudinal study used data from 33,621 individuals (15,822 men and 17,799 women) from the Vasterbotten Intervention Program, to analyse how changes in access to individual social capital influence self-rated health (SRH) over time. Two forms of structural social capital, i.e. informal socializing and social participation, were measured. Age, sex, education, marital status, smoking, snuff, physical activity, alcohol consumption, high blood pressure, and body mass index were analysed as potential confounders. The association between changes in access to structural social capital and SRH in the follow-up was adjusted for SRH at baseline, as well as for changes in the socio-demographic and health-risk variables over time. The results support that changes in access to structural social capital over time impact on SRH. Remaining with no/low level of informal socializing over time increased the odds ratio for poor SRH for both men and women (OR of 1.45; 95%CI = 1.22-1.73 among men and OR of 1.56; 95%CI = 1.33-1.84 among women). Remaining with no/low levels of social participation was also detrimental to SRH in men and women (OR 1.14; 95%CI = 1.03-1.26 among men and OR 1.18; 95% Cl = 1.08-1.29 among women). A decrease in informal socializing over time was associated with poor SRH for women and men (OR of 135; 95%CI = 1.16-1.58 among men and OR of 1.57; 95%Cl = 1.36-1.82 among women). A loss of social participation had a negative effect on SRH among men and women (OR of 1.16; 95%Cl = 1.03-130 among men and OR of 1.15; 95%CI = 1.04-1.27 among women). Gaining access to social participation was harmful for SRH for women (OR 1.17; 95%CI = 1.05-131). Structural social capital has complex and gendered effects on SRH and interventions aiming to use social capital for health promotion purposes require an awareness of its gendered nature.

Keyword
Northern Sweden,  Social capital,  Self-rated health,  Longitudinal study,  Vasterbotten Intervention Program,  Gender
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101056 (URN)10.1016/j.socscimed.2015.02.029 (DOI)000351785500028 ()25734610 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-18 Created: 2015-03-18 Last updated: 2017-05-23Bibliographically approved
Wu, F., Guo, Y., Chatterji, S., Zheng, Y., Naidoo, N., Jiang, Y., . . . Kowal, P. (2015). Common risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases among older adults in China, Ghana, Mexico, India, Russia and South Africa: the study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) wave 1. BMC Public Health, 15, Article ID 88.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Common risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases among older adults in China, Ghana, Mexico, India, Russia and South Africa: the study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) wave 1
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2015 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Behavioral risk factors such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, insufficient physical activity and the harmful use of alcohol are known and modifiable contributors to a number of NCDs and health mediators. The purpose of this paper is to describe the distribution of main risk factors for NCDs by socioeconomic status (SES) among adults aged 50 years and older within a country and compare these risk factors across six lower- and upper-middle income countries. Methods: The study population in this paper draw from SAGE Wave 1 and consisted of adults aged 50-plus from China (N=13,157), Ghana (N=4,305), India (N=6,560), Mexico (N=2,318), the Russian Federation (N=3,938) and South Africa (N=3,836). Seven main common risk factors for NCDs were identified: daily tobacco use, frequent heavy drinking, low level physical activity, insufficient vegetable and fruit intake, high risk waist-hip ratio, obesity and hypertension. Multiple risk factors were also calculated by summing all these risk factors. Results: The prevalence of daily tobacco use ranged from 7.7% (Ghana) to 46.9% (India), frequent heavy drinker was the highest in China (6.3%) and lowest in India (0.2%), and the highest prevalence of low physical activity was in South Africa (59.7%). The highest prevalence of respondents with high waist-to-hip ratio risk was 84.5% in Mexico, and the prevalence of self-reported hypertension ranging from 33% (India) to 78% (South Africa). Obesity was more common in South Africa, the Russia Federation and Mexico (45.2%, 36% and 28.6%, respectively) compared with China, India and Ghana (15.3%, 9.7% and 6.4%, respectively). China, Ghana and India had a higher prevalence of respondents with multiple risk factors than Mexico, the Russia Federation and South Africa. The occurrence of three and four risk factors was more prevalent in Mexico, the Russia Federation and South Africa. Conclusion: There were substantial variations across countries and settings, even between upper-middle income countries and lower-middle income countries. The baseline information on the magnitude of the problem of risk factors provided by this study can help countries and health policymakers to set up interventions addressing the global non-communicable disease epidemic.

Keyword
Chronic non-communicable diseases, SAGE, Tobacco use, Obesity, Low- and middle-income countries
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102290 (URN)10.1186/s12889-015-1407-0 (DOI)000349745200001 ()25885218 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-24 Created: 2015-04-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Schröders, J., Wall, S., Kusnanto, H. & Ng, N. (2015). Millennium Development Goal Four and Child Health Inequities in Indonesia: A Systematic Review of the Literature. PLoS ONE, 10(5), Article ID e0123629.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Millennium Development Goal Four and Child Health Inequities in Indonesia: A Systematic Review of the Literature
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0123629Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 calls for reducing mortality of children under-five years by two-thirds by 2015. Indonesia is on track to officially meet the MDG 4 targets by 2015 but progress has been far from universal. It has been argued that national level statistics, on which MDG 4 relies, obscure persistent health inequities within the country. Particularly inequities in child health are a major global public health challenge both for achieving MDG 4 in 2015 and beyond. This review aims to map out the situation of MDG 4 with respect to disadvantaged populations in Indonesia applying the Social Determinants of Health (SDH) framework. The specific objectives are to answer: Who are the disadvantaged populations? Where do they live? And why and how is the inequitable distribution of health explained in terms of the SDH framework?

Methods and Findings We retrieved studies through a systematic review of peer-reviewed and gray literature published in 1995-2014. The PRISMA-Equity 2012 statement was adapted to guide the methods of this review. The dependent variables were MDG 4-related indicators; the independent variable "disadvantaged populations" was defined by different categories of social differentiation using PROGRESS. Included texts were analyzed following the guidelines for deductive content analysis operationalized on the basis of the SDH framework. We identified 83 studies establishing evidence on more than 40 different determinants hindering an equitable distribution of child health in Indonesia. The most prominent determinants arise from the shortcomings within the rural health care system, the repercussions of food poverty coupled with low health literacy among parents, the impact of low household decision-making power of mothers, and the consequences of high persistent use of traditional birth attendants among ethnic minorities.

Conclusion This review calls for enhanced understanding of the determinants and pathways that create, detain, and overcome inequities in child health in resource constraint settings like Indonesia and the promotion of actionable health policy recommendations and tailored investments.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106275 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0123629 (DOI)000353943400006 ()25942491 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-07-10 Created: 2015-07-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Stewart Williams, J., Ng, N., Peltzer, K., Yawson, A., Biritwum, R., Maximova, T., . . . Chatterji, S. (2015). Risk Factors and Disability Associated with Low Back Pain in Older Adults in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Results from the WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE). PLoS ONE, 10(6), e0127880
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk Factors and Disability Associated with Low Back Pain in Older Adults in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Results from the WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE)
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, p. e0127880-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Back pain is a common disabling chronic condition that burdens individuals, families and societies. Epidemiological evidence, mainly from high-income countries, shows positive association between back pain prevalence and older age. There is an urgent need for accurate epidemiological data on back pain in adult populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where populations are ageing rapidly. The objectives of this study are to: measure the prevalence of back pain; identify risk factors and determinants associated with back pain, and describe association between back pain and disability in adults aged 50 years and older, in six LMICs from different regions of the world. The findings provide insights into country-level differences in self-reported back pain and disability in a group of socially, culturally, economically and geographically diverse LMICs.

METHODS: Standardized national survey data collected from adults (50 years and older) participating in the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) were analysed. The weighted sample (n = 30, 146) comprised respondents in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, South Africa and the Russian Federation. Multivariable regressions describe factors associated with back pain prevalence and intensity, and back pain as a determinant of disability.

RESULTS: Prevalence was highest in the Russian Federation (56%) and lowest in China (22%). In the pooled multi-country analyses, female sex, lower education, lower wealth and multiple chronic morbidities were significant in association with past-month back pain (p<0.01). About 8% of respondents reported that they experienced intense back pain in the previous month.

CONCLUSIONS: Evidence on back pain and its impact on disability is needed in developing countries so that governments can invest in cost-effective education and rehabilitation to reduce the growing social and economic burden imposed by this disabling condition.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-105551 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0127880 (DOI)000355701600027 ()26042785 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-25 Created: 2015-06-25 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Norberg, M., Malmberg, G., Ng, N. & Broström, G. (2015). Use of moist smokeless tobacco (snus) and the risk of development of alcohol dependence: a cohort study in a middle-aged population in Sweden.. Drug And Alcohol Dependence, 149, 151-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of moist smokeless tobacco (snus) and the risk of development of alcohol dependence: a cohort study in a middle-aged population in Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 149, p. 151-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Convincing evidence shows that smoking is associated with alcohol dependence (AD) and a positive correlation between snus and alcohol consumption was previously shown in cross-sectional studies. We performed a longitudinal evaluation of the risk of snus users to develop AD.

METHODS: A cohort study in Västerbotten County, Sweden, linked individual data on socioeconomic situation and health survey data from 21,037 men and women (46.5% men). AD was defined by the CAGE questionnaire and evaluated at baseline 1991-1997 and again after 10 years. The risk of developing AD was assessed using logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching.

RESULTS: 2370 men and 430 women used snus and were without AD at baseline. Over the 10-year period, 499 men and 257 women developed AD, among whom 191 and 26, respectively, were baseline snus users. The crude relative risks of AD for male and female snus users compared to non-users were 1.8 with 95% CI (1.5, 2.2) and 2.9 (2.0, 4.3), respectively. Adjusted logistic regression showed a positive dose-response relationship between snus use and risk of AD. Analyses involving propensity score matching revealed 33 and 17 new cases of AD in men and women, respectively, after 10 years given 1000 men and 1000 women without AD had been baseline snus users rather than non-users. Results for current, previous and never smokers were similar.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of snus is prospectively associated with an increased risk of AD with a dose-response relationship that is independent of smoking status.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101164 (URN)10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.01.042 (DOI)000351799200021 ()25707707 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2017-05-23Bibliographically approved
Hirve, S., Verdes, E., Lele, P., Juvekar, S., Blomstedt, Y., Tollman, S., . . . Ng, N. (2014). Evaluating Reporting Heterogeneity in Self-Rated Health Among Adults Aged 50 Years and Above in India: An Anchoring Vignettes Analytic Approach. Journal of Aging and Health, 26(6), 1015-1031
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating Reporting Heterogeneity in Self-Rated Health Among Adults Aged 50 Years and Above in India: An Anchoring Vignettes Analytic Approach
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1015-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To use anchoring vignettes to evaluate reporting heterogeneity (RH) in self-rated mobility and cognition in older adults. Method: We analyzed vignettes and self-rated mobility and cognition in 2,558 individuals aged 50 years and above. We tested for assumptions of vignette equivalence (VE) and response consistency (RC). We used a joint hierarchical ordered probit (HOPIT) model to evaluate self-rating responses for RH. Results: The assumption of VE was met except for "learning" vignettes. Higher socioeconomic status (SES) and education significantly lowered thresholds for cognition ratings. After correction for RH, women, lower SES, and older respondents were significantly more likely to report greater difficulty in mobility. The influence of age, SES, and education on thresholds was less apparent for cognition. Discussion: Our study provides strong evidence of RH in self-rated mobility and cognition. We highlight the need to formally test basic assumptions before using vignettes to adjust self-rating responses for RH.

Keyword
reporting heterogeneity; differential item functioning; mobility; cognition; self-rating; anchoring vignettes; India
National Category
Geriatrics Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-90527 (URN)10.1177/0898264314535634 (DOI)000340728600007 ()24925690 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-24 Created: 2014-06-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Kien, V. D., Van Minh, H., Giang, K. B., Weinehall, L. & Ng, N. (2014). Horizontal inequity in public health care service utilization for non-communicable diseases in urban Vietnam. Global Health Action, 7, Article ID 24919.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Horizontal inequity in public health care service utilization for non-communicable diseases in urban Vietnam
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2014 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 7, article id 24919Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: A health system that provides equitable health care is a principal goal in many countries. Measuring horizontal inequity (HI) in health care utilization is important to develop appropriate and equitable public policies, especially policies related to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey of 1,211 randomly selected households in slum and non-slum areas was carried out in four urban districts of Hanoi city in 2013. This study utilized data from 3,736 individuals aged 15 years and older. Respondents were asked about health care use during the previous 12 months; information included sex, age, and self-reported NCDs. We assessed the extent of inequity in utilization of public health care services. Concentration indexes for health care utilization and health care needs were constructed via probit regression of individual utilization of public health care services, controlling for age, sex, and NCDs. In addition, concentration indexes were decomposed to identify factors contributing to inequalities in health care utilization. RESULTS: The proportion of healthcare utilization in the slum and non-slum areas was 21.4 and 26.9%, respectively. HI in health care utilization in favor of the rich was observed in the slum areas, whereas horizontal equity was achieved among the non-slum areas. In the slum areas, we identified some key factors that affect the utilization of public health care services. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that to achieve horizontal equity in utilization of public health care services, policy should target preventive interventions for NCDs, focusing more on the poor in slum areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CoAction Publishing, 2014
Keyword
healthcare utilization, horizontal equity, non-communicable diseases, decomposition, urban Vietnam
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92689 (URN)10.3402/gha.v7.24919 (DOI)000348787300005 ()25095780 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-09-01 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Pujilestari, C. U., Ng, N., Hakimi, M. & Eriksson, M. (2014). "It is not possible for me to have diabetes": Community Perceptions on Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia. Global Journal of Health Science, 6(5), 35738
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"It is not possible for me to have diabetes": Community Perceptions on Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia
2014 (English)In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, E-ISSN 1916-9744, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 35738-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Accumulating evidence suggests that negative perceptions towards diabetes can limit the management and prevention of the disease. The negative perceptions towards diabetes are prevalent in many different settings, especially among rural communities. Few qualitative studies have been performed to understand how the community views diabetes and its associated risk factors. This study aimed to explore general community perceptions of diabetes and its risk factors in rural Indonesia. A total of 68 participants were recruited to 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) comprised of different age groups and sexes. The FGDs were conducted in six villages in rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia, from 2011 to 2012. All FGDs were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative content analysis was performed to describe and analyse how the rural community perceived diabetes and its risk factors. Diabetes was perceived as a visible and scary sugar disease, and the affected individuals themselves were blamed for getting the disease. Recognised as 'sugar' or 'sweet-pee' disease with terrifying effects, diabetes was believed to be a disease with no cure. The participants seemed to have an unrealistic optimism with regards to the diabetes risk factors. They believed that diabetes would not affect them, only others, and that having family members with diabetes was necessary for one to develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that rural communities have negative perceptions about diabetes and at the same time individuals have unrealistic optimism about their own risk factors. Understanding how such communities perceive diabetes and its risk factors is important for planning prevention strategies. Health messages need to be tailored to health-related behaviours and the local culture's concepts of diseases and risk factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2014
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95819 (URN)10.5539/gjhs.v6n5p204 (DOI)25168994 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-05 Created: 2014-11-05 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Krishnan, A., Amarchand, R., Byass, P., Pandav, C. & Ng, N. (2014). "No one says 'No' to money": a mixed methods approach for evaluating conditional cash transfer schemes to improve girl children's status in Haryana, India.. International Journal for Equity in Health, 13(1), 11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"No one says 'No' to money": a mixed methods approach for evaluating conditional cash transfer schemes to improve girl children's status in Haryana, India.
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2014 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Haryana was the first state in India to launch a conditional cash transfer (CCT) scheme in 1994. Initially it targeted all disadvantaged girls but was revised in 2005 to restrict it to second girl children of all groups. The benefit which accrued at girl attaining 18 years and subject to conditionalities of being fully immunized, studying till class 10 and remaining unmarried, was increased from about US$ 500 to US$ 2000. Using a mixed methods approach, we evaluated the implementation and possible impact of these two schemes.

METHODS: A survey was conducted among 200 randomly selected respondents of Ballabgarh Block in Haryana to assess their perceptions of girl children and related schemes. A cohort of births during this period was assembled from population database of 28 villages in this block and changes in sex ratio at birth and in immunization coverage at one year of age among boys and girls was measured. Education levels and mean age at marriage of daughters were compared with daughters-in-law from outside Haryana. In-depth interviews were conducted among district level implementers of these schemes to assess their perceptions of programs' implementation and impact. These were analyzed using a thematic approach.

RESULTS: The perceptions of girls as a liability and poor (9% to 15%) awareness of the schemes was noted. The cohort analysis showed that while there has been an improvement in the indicators studied, these were similar to those seen among the control groups. Qualitative analysis identified a "conspiracy of silence" - an underplaying of the pervasiveness of the problem coupled with a passive implementation of the program and a clash between political culture of giving subsidies and a bureaucratic approach that imposed many conditionalities and documentary needs for availing of benefits.

CONCLUSION: The apparent lack of impact on the societal mindset calls for a revision in the current approach of addressing a social issue by a purely conditional cash transfer program.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86007 (URN)10.1186/1475-9276-13-11 (DOI)000332939700002 ()24484583 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Salimi, S., Ng, N., Seliger, S. L. & Parsa, A. (2014). Periodontal Disease, Renal Dysfunction and Heightened Leukocytosis.. Nephron. Clinical practice, 128(1-2), 107-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Periodontal Disease, Renal Dysfunction and Heightened Leukocytosis.
2014 (English)In: Nephron. Clinical practice, ISSN 1660-8151, E-ISSN 2235-3186, Vol. 128, no 1-2, p. 107-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Leukocytosis is a powerful predictor of incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and related outcomes. However, the association between periodontitis measures and increased leukocytosis in the context of CKD has not been well described. We sought to identify which individual measures of periodontal disease may best associate with reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria, and to test if these measures were associated with increased leukocytosis in subjects with established CKD.

Methods:

We estimated, among 13,270 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III study, the associations between case-based definition of periodontitis, clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth (PD) as individual measures of periodontal disease, with renal function measures and leukocytosis.

Results:

In adjusted multivariate analyses, case-based definition of severe periodontitis was associated with albuminuria (β = 0.003, p = 0.01) but not with eGFR. However, CAL and PD were all individually associated with both albuminuria (β = 0.08, p < 0.001 and β = 0.06, p < 0.001, respectively) and eGFR (β = -0.05, p < 0.001 and β = -0.03, p < 0.001, respectively). We found significant associations between elevated CAL and PD with leukocytosis. Lastly, we found a marked association between the joint presence of CKD and elevated CAL or PD with leukocytosis (odds ratio (OR) 3.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-7.5 and OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.7, respectively).

Conclusion:

Individual measures of periodontal disease are associated with renal function and heightened leukocytosis in CKD subjects. The significantly added inflammatory burden noted in CKD subjects with periodontal disease argue for targeting periodontitis treatment as part of our multifaceted approach to CKD patients. 

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97416 (URN)10.1159/000366445 (DOI)000347919800016 ()25402594 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0556-1483

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