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Sundström, Anna
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Sörman Eriksson, D., Rönnlund, M., Sundström, A., Norberg, M. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2017). Social network size and cognitive functioning in middle-aged adults: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations. Journal of Adult Development, 24(2), 77-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social network size and cognitive functioning in middle-aged adults: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Adult Development, ISSN 1068-0667, E-ISSN 1573-3440, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of the present study was to examine relations between social network size and three cognitive abilities (episodic memory, semantic memory, visuospatial ability) in middle-aged adults. We analyzed cross-sectional data on social network size and cognitive functioning that were available for 804 participants aged 40–60 years. In addition, we examined 5- and 10-year follow-up measurements of cognitive functioning that were available for 604 and 255 participants, respectively. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a positive association between social network size and each of the three cognitive abilities. Baseline network size was positively related to 5-year changes in semantic memory, and to 10-year changes in semantic as well as episodic memory, but was unrelated to changes in visuospatial performance. A minor portion of the sample (n = 131) had 10-year follow-up data on network size. Cross-lagged panel correlations revealed that baseline network size was associated with follow-up measurement in cognitive functioning (episodic memory, semantic memory), whereas baseline cognitive performance was unrelated to future network size. Together, the results demonstrate a small but positive relation between network size and declarative memory abilities, in line with models proposing a cognitive reserve built up by factors such as the increased cognitive stimulation associated with a more extensive social network.

Keyword
Cognition, Longitudinal, Cross-sectional, Social network, Cognitive reserve
National Category
Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sociology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101832 (URN)10.1007/s10804-016-9248-3 (DOI)000399825300001 ()
Note

Originally published in manuscript form.

Available from: 2015-04-14 Created: 2015-04-14 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Rönnlund, M., Sundström, A., Adolfsson, R. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2015). Social relationships and risk of dementia: a population-based study. International psychogeriatrics, 27(8), 1391-1399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social relationships and risk of dementia: a population-based study
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2015 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 1391-1399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The objective was to examine whether aspects of social relationships in old age are associated with all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Methods: We studied 1,715 older adults (≥ 65 years) who were dementia-free at baseline over a period of up to 16 years. Data on living status, contact/visit frequency, satisfaction with contact frequency, and having/not having a close friend were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regressions with all-cause dementia or AD as the dependent variable. To control for reverse causality and to identify potential long-term effects, we additionally performed analyses with delayed entry.

Results: We identified 373 incident cases of dementia (207 with AD) during follow-up. The variable visiting/visits from friends was associated with reduced risk of all-cause dementia. Further, a higher value on the relationships index (sum of all variables) was associated with reduced risk of all-cause dementia and AD. However, in analyses with delayed entry, restricted to participants with a survival time of three years or more, none of the social relationship variables was associated with all-cause dementia or AD.

Conclusions: The results indicate that certain aspects of social relationships are associated with incident dementia or AD, but also that these associations may reflect reverse causality. Future studies aimed at identifying other factors of a person's social life that may have the potential to postpone dementia should consider the effects of reverse causality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keyword
dementia, Alzheimer's disease, longitudinal, social relationships, social network
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101778 (URN)10.1017/S1041610215000319 (DOI)000361384500014 ()25779679 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Sundström, A., Rönnlund, M., Adolfsson, R. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2014). Leisure Activity in Old Age and Risk of Dementia: a 15-Year Prospective Study. The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, 69(4), 493-501
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leisure Activity in Old Age and Risk of Dementia: a 15-Year Prospective Study
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2014 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 493-501Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate whether leisure activity is associated with incident dementia in an older sample.

Method. We examined a sample of 1,475 elderly (>= 65 years) who were dementia free at baseline over a follow-up period of up to 15 years. In addition to analyses involving the total time period, separate analyses of three time periods were performed, 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15 years, following baseline measurement of leisure activity.

Results. After controlling for a variety of potential confounders, analyses of data for the total time period revealed that higher levels of "Total activity" and "Social activity," but not "Mental activity," were associated with decreased risk of dementia. However, analyses of the separate time periods showed that this association was only significant in the first time period, 1-5 years after baseline.

Discussion. The results from this study provide little support for the hypothesis that frequent engagement in leisure activities among elderly serve to protect against dementia diseases across a longer time frame. The finding of a relationship for the first time period, 1-5 years after baseline, could indicate short-term protective effects but could also reflect reverse causality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2014
Keyword
Cognitive aging, Dementia, Leisure activities, Lifestyle, Longitudinal
National Category
Psychology Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-79204 (URN)10.1093/geronb/gbt056 (DOI)000338009000001 ()23766435 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84902162889 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Sundström, A., Rönnlund, M., Adolfsson, R. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2014). Stressful life events are not associated with development of dementia. International psychogeriatrics, 26, 147-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stressful life events are not associated with development of dementia
2014 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 26, p. 147-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The impact of stressful life events as a risk factor of dementia diseases is inconclusive. We sought to determine whether stressful negative life events are associated with incidental dementia in a population-based study with long-term follow-up. We also tested the hypothesis that the occurrence of positive life events could mitigate or overcome the possible adverse effects of negative life events on dementia conversion.

Methods: The study involved 2,462 dementia-free participants aged 55 years and older. Information on life events was ascertained at baseline from a comprehensive Life Event Inventory, which included 56 questions about specific life events. For each life event, the emotional impact (both positive and negative) and emotional adjustment were asked for.

Results: During follow-up, 423 participants developed dementia; of these, 240 developed Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cox regression analysis showed no association between the total number of negative life events and the incidence of dementia when adjusted solely for age and gender (hazard ratio = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.92-1.02), or with multiple adjustments for a range of covariates (hazard ratio = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.91-1.01). Similarly, neither emotional impact nor emotional adjustment to these life events was associated with incident dementia. A separate analysis of AD did not alter the results.

Conclusions: The result of this population-based study finds no association between negative or positive life events and dementia. Accordingly, our results reject the hypothesis that stressful life events trigger the onset of dementia diseases.

Keyword
dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, life events, stress, risk factor, longitudinal
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-84031 (URN)10.1017/S1041610213001804 (DOI)000332513600016 ()24182362 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2013-12-13 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Sundström, A., Westerlund, O., Mousavi-Nasab, H., Adolfsson, R. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2014). The relationship between marital and parental status and the risk of dementia. International psychogeriatrics, 26(5), 749-757
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relationship between marital and parental status and the risk of dementia
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2014 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 749-757Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study examines the association between marital and parental status and their individual and combined effect on risk of dementia diseases in a population-based longitudinal study while controlling for a range of potential confounders, including social networks and exposure to stressful negative life events. Methods: A total of 1,609 participants without dementia, aged 65 years and over, were followed for an average period of 8.6 years (SD = 4.8). During follow-up, 354 participants were diagnosed with dementia. Cox regression was used to investigate the effect of marital and parental status on risk of dementia. Results: In univariate Cox regression models (adjusted for age as time scale), widowed (hazard ratio (HR) 1.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-1.78), and not having children (HR 1.54, 95% CI = 1.15-2.06) were significantly associated with incident dementia. In multivariate analyses that included simultaneously marital and parental status and covariates that were found to be significant in univariate models (p < 0.10), the HR was 1.30 (95% CI = 1.01-1.66) for widowed, and 1.51 (95% CI = 1.08-2.10) for those not having children. Finally, a group of four combined factors was constructed: married parents (reference), married without children, widowed parents, and widowed without children. The combined effect revealed a 1.3 times higher risk (95% CI = 1.03-1.76) of dementia in widow parents, and a 2.2 times higher risk (95% CI = 1.36-3.60) in widowed persons without children, in relation to married parents. No significant difference was observed for those being married and without children. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that marital- and parental status are important risk factors for developing dementia, with especially increased risk in those being both widowed and without children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2014
Keyword
dementia, marital status, parental status, risk factors, childlessness, longitudinal
National Category
Psychology Geriatrics
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-85012 (URN)10.1017/S1041610213002652 (DOI)000333639000006 ()24451183 (PubMedID)
Funder
Linnaeus research environment CADICS, 2006-21576-36119-66
Available from: 2014-01-24 Created: 2014-01-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M., Sundström, A., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2013). Effects of Perceived Long-Term Stress on Subjective and Objective Aspects of Memory and Cognitive Functioning in a Middle-Aged Population-Based Sample. The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 174(1), 25-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Perceived Long-Term Stress on Subjective and Objective Aspects of Memory and Cognitive Functioning in a Middle-Aged Population-Based Sample
2013 (English)In: The Journal of Genetic Psychology, ISSN 0022-1325, E-ISSN 1940-0896, Vol. 174, no 1, p. 25-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The longitudinal effects of perceived stress on measures of memory and two other cognitive functions (word fluency, visuospatial ability) in a middle-aged sample (4060 years, M age = 47.1 years, SD = 6.1 years; n = 192) were examined. A group describing themselves as stressed in general at baseline, and at follow-up measurement 5 and 10 years later (n = 96) was compared with a matched (age, sex) low-stress group (n = 96). The results revealed more depressive symptoms over time in the high-stress group. With regard to memory, a dissociation between subjective and objective measures was observed. Specifically, participants in the high-stress group rated their memory as worse over time as compared with controls, and reported a higher frequency of occurrence of everyday memory failures, effects partly independent of depressive symptoms. However, the groups did not differ in terms of objective episodic memory performance, word fluency or block design performance, with stable levels of performance over time regardless of perceived stress. The lack of effects of stress on cognitive performance is discussed in the light of factors such as stress level, age of the participants, and other individual difference factors.

Keyword
longitudinal, middle age, memory, stress
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-64241 (URN)10.1080/00221325.2011.635725 (DOI)000312453800002 ()
Available from: 2013-01-29 Created: 2013-01-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Blomstedt, Y., Sahlén, K. G., Nilsson, I., Sundström, A. & Brändström, A. (2013). Elderly care in Swedish welfare state: implications of the population ageing. In: Yushi Li (Ed.), Global aging issues and policies: understanding the importance of comprehending and studying the aging process (pp. 226-244). Springfield: Charles C. Thomas Publisher Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elderly care in Swedish welfare state: implications of the population ageing
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2013 (English)In: Global aging issues and policies: understanding the importance of comprehending and studying the aging process / [ed] Yushi Li, Springfield: Charles C. Thomas Publisher Ltd., 2013, p. 226-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springfield: Charles C. Thomas Publisher Ltd., 2013
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-85522 (URN)978-0-398-08866-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-02-05 Created: 2014-02-05 Last updated: 2016-01-18Bibliographically approved
Sundström, A., Westerlund, O., Mousavi-Nasab, S. H., Adolfsson, R. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2013). Relationship between marital and parental status and risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Paper presented at Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2013. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 9(4, Supplement), P631
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationship between marital and parental status and risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease
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2013 (English)In: Alzheimer's & Dementia, ISSN 1552-5260, E-ISSN 1552-5279, Vol. 9, no 4, Supplement, p. P631-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is increasing evidence that social network factors may affect risk of developing dementia. The objective of the present study was to examine the association between marital and parental status separately and their combined effect on the risk of incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: A total of 1707 members of a population-based prospective cohort study aged 65 and over were followed for an average period of 9.5 years. During follow-up, 393 participants were diagnosed with dementia, including 221 of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Age, sex, education, smoking, vascular diseases, depressive symptoms, and stressful negative life events were used as covariates. Results: Cox logistic regression revealed that unmarried have a greater incidence of dementia and AD compared to married. Participants that were childless were also more likely to develop dementia and AD than those who were parents. Examining the combined effects of marital and parental status revealed that the already negative effect of being unmarried was further enhanced if the individuals were also childless. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both marital and parental statuses are associated with risk of dementia and that the effect of marital status need to be examined while taking into account parenthood. Further studies are needed to confirm our finding and to explore the mechanisms underlying this association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-85523 (URN)10.1016/j.jalz.2013.05.1277 (DOI)
Conference
Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2013
Note

Poster presentation P3-204.

Available from: 2014-02-05 Created: 2014-02-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Rönnlund, M., Sundström, A. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2012). Leisure-time activity in old age as predictors of impending dementia: A 15-year prospective study.. In: : . Paper presented at Cognitive Aging Conference, Atlanta, USA, 2012 (19th – 21st of April (pp. 249-249).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leisure-time activity in old age as predictors of impending dementia: A 15-year prospective study.
2012 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study examined the relationship between leisure activities and risk of dementia in a sample of healthy older individuals, dementia free at the beginning of the project. Data were drawn from a population-based longitudinal study (the Betula project) and the participants were followed up for 15 years. At baseline, participants were asked about their frequency of participation in 15 selected leisure activities. When age, gender, education, APOE and other potential confounders were controlled for, results revealed quite moderate effects on dementia after analysis of the activities separately. However, by weighting each activity into a mental, social and physical dimension (based on valuation by the participants), and then summarizing into a score for each dimension, we further investigated if level of engagement could predict impending dementia. Preliminary results indicate that the dimensions may have influence on the risk of dementia for certain age groups. The study also showed that the strongest predictor of dementia is being a carrier of the APOE ɛ4 allele. The outcomes are discussed in terms of important methodological difference between studies concerning the effects of leisure activities in preventing dementia diseases.

Series
Cognitive Aging Conference (2012). Abstracts of Paper and Poster presentations
Keyword
Leisure activity, Cognitive aging, Dementia
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-99318 (URN)
Conference
Cognitive Aging Conference, Atlanta, USA, 2012 (19th – 21st of April
Available from: 2015-02-06 Created: 2015-02-06 Last updated: 2016-05-09
Mousavi-Nasab, S. H., Kormi-Nouri, R., Sundström, A. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2012). The effects of marital status on episodic and semantic memory in healthy middle-aged and old individuals. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 53(1), 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of marital status on episodic and semantic memory in healthy middle-aged and old individuals
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study examined the influences of marital status on different episodic and semantic memory tasks. A total of 1882 adult men and women participated in a longitudinal project (Betula) on memory, health and aging. The participants were grouped into two age cohorts, 35–60 and 65–85, and studied over a period of 5 years. Episodic memory tasks concerned recognition and recall, whereas semantic memory tasks concerned knowledge and fluency. The results showed, after controlling for education, some diseases, chronological age and leisure activity as covariates, that there were significant differences between married and single individuals in episodic memory, but not in semantic memory. Married people showed significantly better memory performances than singles in both subsystems of episodic memory, that is, recall and recognition. Also, the rate of decline in episodic memory was significantly larger for singles and widowed than other groups over the 5-year time period in both age groups. The findings demonstrate that the positive relation found between marriage and health can be extended to the relation between marriage and cognitive performance. This effect might be explained by the role played by cognitive stimulation in memory and cognition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2012
Keyword
Marital status, age, episodic memory, semantic memory
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-50679 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9450.2011.00926.x (DOI)
Available from: 2011-12-19 Created: 2011-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
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