umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Granqvist, Raoul
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 223) Show all publications
Granqvist, R. J. (2015). Förord. In: Elechi Amadi, De stora dammarna: (pp. v-x). Stockholm: Modernista.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Förord
2015 (Swedish)In: Elechi Amadi, De stora dammarna, Stockholm: Modernista , 2015, v-x p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Elechi Amadi’s (b. 1934) novel The Great Ponds is a stylized, only seemingly simple, story about a conflict between two Ikwerre villages (Niger Delta, today Rivers State, Nigeria). The conflict concerns to begin with an internal local wrestling match, a male skirmish, about fishing rights between ‘strong men’ and the leaders’ manipulative handling of the god systems, to escalate into an apocalyptic pandemonium of death with wonjo (1918), the Spanish Flu (La Grippe) as the catalyst. References to wonjo occur only at the very end of The Great Ponds, as if Amadi had resolved to position his story in a de-contextualized exclusive African enclave on the Atlantic coast, outside the history of the white man’s two century-long colonization of Ikwerre land and neighboring Igboland. This may have been his decision, only that a writer’s decision can be jammed by his book, which is the case here. Amadi wrote his story in 1969 while the Nigerian civil war, the Biafran War (1967-1970), was on going; the writer staunchly loyal with the Federal side throughout. The absence in The Great Ponds of ‘white men,’ ‘white religions,’ and the ’white decease’ (as the Spanish Flue has been identified as, only that it was global; 40,000 thousand died in Sweden and even more in Finland), it needs to be pointed out, only has a formal significance. The cruelties that embodied the breaking down of the two villages in the novel were underpinned by a series of ‘events’: one, the wonjo; second, the colonial wars that had been waged in the Niger Delta between the British and the Igbo ever since the first missionaries arrived in the 1850s; third, the Biafran War that positioned, sadly, Amadi– in theory – against Chinua Achebe, his colleague and friend. They were born and bred 150 km from each other; Achebe four years his older; they had been to the same prestigious colonial school, Government College, Umuahio; and were alumni at University College, Ibadan. An Ikwerre against an Igbo. No!

Achebe’s Things Fall Apart (1958) engages the ‘white men’ and their religion; Achebe wrote a history about the colonial encounter. Amadi erased the Europeans. Amadi wrote an ethnographic allegory from within local belief systems. But more importantly, the two share the vision of what constitutes the foundation for not ‘falling apart,’ whether it is a group or an individual and a village like Chiolu (Amadi) or Umuofia (Achebe): the ability to talk, to negotiate, to compromise, and when rule systems violate the dynamism of change (impacted by neighbors, foreigners, or women), disobey the ‘rules,’ replace them! No god can breathe for long within the pages of a single volume! The once commensurate patriarchal system in The Great Ponds, based on concord and solidarity, disintegrated into religious fundamentalism, brutal violence, greed, and mercilessness, with the gods and their adjuncts in recalcitrant partnership. It was not wonjo’s fault!

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Modernista, 2015
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112502 (URN)978-91-7499-553-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-10Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, R. J. (2015). Förord. In: Nuruddin Farah, Hemligheter: (pp. v-x). Stockholm: Modernista.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Förord
2015 (Swedish)In: Nuruddin Farah, Hemligheter, Stockholm: Modernista , 2015, v-x p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Nuruddin Farah’s Secret, the third in a suite of three novels called ‘Blood in the Sun,’ was written in Berlin in 1990. It was originally dubbed ‘Awake, When Asleep,’ an evangelical plea for social and political redemption whose idealism Farah did not walk out on but camouflaged under an uncompromising exploration. Somalia had become a nightmare and has stayed a life-long trauma for Farah himself. With the Wall collapsing outside the windows at Potsdamer Platz and the jubilant demonstrators’ catch phrase "We are the people" metamorphosing into "We are ONE people,” the novel’s title and language changed. Farah’s documentation of the collective horror of Somalia in decay, the converse of German unity (as it seemed), could only be searched through a radical literary diagnosis that shattered ‘normalcies’ that bound together family-clan, man-woman, right-wrong, sanity-insanity, God-gods-fathoms. Farah deconstructs, unveils, ruthlessly the mechanisms of patrilineal genetics, patronymics, rape, blood binds, foster children, down to their minutest, most mazelike particulars; even the interlinguas of animals. All is made transcendent. This is what the ‘secrets’ connote. Cultural taboos and religious codes of loyalty, normalcies, kill.

In monologues, all the five narrators, Kaaman, Sholoongo, Yaqut, Damac and Nonno, tell stories about themselves, about each other. They do it through fables, innuendos, whispers, wrong-sayings, rumors, lies, voyeurism. As readers we have to endure Farah’s fragmented world, simply for it to make sense for us. To achieve this, his fable tells us, we have to understand that there is no secret if life is here to be lived. That the collective mystery of Somalia is a lie: no one understands why someone shoots another human being; why you eat locusts; that no one knows that God does not exist.

Now, a quarter of a century later, dysfunctional Somalia is still there, unchanged, but so also, increasingly, the out of Somalia world, from Damascus in the east to Berlin and Stockholm in the north. Farah’s Secrets concerns us all.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Modernista, 2015
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112477 (URN)978-91-7645-584-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2015-12-10Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, R. J. (2014). Chinua Achebe Revisiting Sweden [Review]. Africa is a Country.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chinua Achebe Revisiting Sweden
2014 (English)In: Africa is a CountryArticle, book review (Refereed) Published
Keyword
African literature, Chinua Achebe
National Category
Humanities General Literature Studies
Research subject
Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87131 (URN)
Note

Published 21 March 2104

Available from: 2014-03-21 Created: 2014-03-21 Last updated: 2014-03-28Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, R. J. (2014). Det förflutnas melankoli och möjlighet: Erla Husgafvels småländska diaspora. Horisont (Svenska Österbottens litteraturförening), 4(61), 14-23.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Det förflutnas melankoli och möjlighet: Erla Husgafvels småländska diaspora
2014 (Swedish)In: Horisont (Svenska Österbottens litteraturförening), ISSN 0439-5530, Vol. 4, no 61, 14-23 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The English title of the current article, “The Melancholy of the Past and Its Possibilities: Erla Husgafvel's Smaland Diaspora,” provides an idealogical backdrop to the tangled emigration to Sweden in 1946 of the Finland-Swedish ethnologist Husgafvel. Leaving Finland so close to the end of the Finnish wars was for her, the staunch Ostrobothnian, patriot, and conservative folklorist, a troublesome enterprise. Settling in Mariannelund, the small southern Sweden city now famous mainly for hosting the filming of Astrid Lindgren's 'Emil in Lonneberga' in the early 1970's (for which Erla and Ekka Husgafvel's handmade candles were used) in 1948, turned into a Husgafvel fairytale of another kind than Lindgren's stories about the lives and customs of Swedish kids. I discuss the Husgafvel metamorphosis of their 'colonized' site into a thirty-year-long exilic exposition of Ostrobothnian peasant customs and a patriotic market place in support of disabled Finnish war veterans with invited villagers as initiates, participants, and customers.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vasa: Svenska Österbottens Litteraturförening, 2014
Keyword
Ostrobothnia, chauvinism, traditions, exile, cultural heritage
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Literature; Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97713 (URN)
Available from: 2015-01-07 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, R. J. (2014). Eliot Elisofon's Africa: Old, Updated, Worse [Review]. Africa is A Country.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eliot Elisofon's Africa: Old, Updated, Worse
2014 (English)In: Africa is A CountryArticle, book review (Refereed) Published
National Category
Humanities General Literature Studies
Research subject
Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86093 (URN)
Note

Published 13 February 2014

Available from: 2014-02-17 Created: 2014-02-17 Last updated: 2014-03-18Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, R. J. (2014). Erla Husgafvel, österbottnisk folklorist i två länder: närvarons problematik, nostalgins förförelse, exilens vemod. Budkavlen, 93(1), 86-100.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Erla Husgafvel, österbottnisk folklorist i två länder: närvarons problematik, nostalgins förförelse, exilens vemod
2014 (Swedish)In: Budkavlen, ISSN 0302-2447, Vol. 93, no 1, 86-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Erla Hovilainen-Husgafvel (f. Lund), född 1907, uppvuxen i Gamlakarleby och Vasa, flyttade med sina föräldrar som femtonåring till Åbo där hon tog studenten vid Åbo svenska samskola och 1928 fil.mag. examen i folklivsforskning för professor Gabriel Nikander vid Åbo Akademi. Under trettio-talet deltog hon i etnologiska fältexpeditioner i Österbotten och Estland och påbörjade ett mångsidigt författarskap med utgångspunkt i sin forskning som skulle (mer eller mindre) upphöra i och med utvandringen till Sverige (via Danmark) efter krigen. Hon dog 1984 i Småland, Sverige.

Kapitlet är strukturerat enligt tre teoretiska modeller, en bibliografisk, en biografisk, och en idéhistorisk. Jag har organiserat Husgafvels skriftliga produktioner i kronologisk ordning (med en bilagd lista på hennes rikssvenska journalistiska arbeten), som samtidigt utgör plattform för att identifiera enskilda verks genretillhörighet (från fältarbetsanteckningen till krönikan, essän, lustspelet, radioprogrammet, dokumentationen/boken) och deras roll i ett särpräglat etnologiskt författarskap. Kapitlet diskuterar hållpunkter (personliga och strukturella) i Husgafels liv som avgörande för hennes förståelsekultur: hennes sociala familjebakgrund, krigen, patriarkala akademiska mönster, och styrkan/svagheten i utanförskap/exil som kvinna/fattig/österbottnisk 'häxa'. Jag länkar det biografiska perspektivet med det idéhistoriska för att förstå eller problematisera tre övergripande motivområden som Husgafvel var besatt av: 1. revolt och anpassning: bygdekonservatism, nationalism, överträdelse; 2. (myten om) det österbottniska samhället (byn) som naturtillstånd och kunskapsreservat; 3. (e)migrationens ideologiska vemod.

Kapitlet är avsett ge ny kunskap om en relativ okänd finlandssvensk etnolog och berätta om ett emigrantöde av ett speciellt slag. 

Abstract [en]

Erla Hovilainen-Husgafvel was born (Lund) in Gamlakarleby/Kokkola in 1907, moved with her family to Vasa/Vaasa while a child, and from there, in her teens, to Åbo/Turku where she attended Åbo svenska samskola. She graduated from Åbo Akademi in 1928 with a master's degree in ethnology ('folklore'), with Professor Gabriel Nikander as her supervisor. During the 1930s she participated in in all eleven ethnological expeditions in Ostrobothnia and Estland and also started her career as a multifaceted writer with its genesis in her fieldwork. Her academic work would terminate (more or less) by the time of her and her husband's emigration to Sweden (via Denmark) in 1946. She died in 1984 at Mariannelund, Småland, in southern Sweden.

The chapter is structured along the three theoretical practices of bibliography, biography, and intellectual history. I have organized Husgafvel's written works chronologically (her newspaper articles written in Sweden appear separately). The bibliographical list of works serves also as tool to identify their generic affiliations (from the field work notes to the chronicle, the essay, the comedy, the radio program, the book/documentary) and their roles in her unconventional ethnological writing. The chapter features stations (personal and structural) in her life that were central for her intellectual formation: her family background, the Finnish wars, patriarchal academic patterns, and the strength/weakness of being alienated/in exile, as woman/ working class poor/ Ostrobothnian 'witch'. I associate the biographical perspective with that of intellectual history in order to understand or problematize three overlapping areas that possessed Husgafvel: 1. rebellion or assimilation, countryside conservatism, nationalism, transgression; 2. the myths about the Ostrobothnian community (the village) as an Edenic reservoir of knowledge; 3. the ideological melancholia of (e/im)migration.

My intention is to introduce a relatively unknown Finland-Swedish ethnologist and to tell a story about a remarkable person who emigrated but never moved. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Åbo: Institutet för folklivsforskning vid Åbo Akademi, 2014
Keyword
Ostrobothnia, Finland-Swedish nationalism, migration, exile, ethnology
National Category
Languages and Literature Ethnology
Research subject
Ethnology; Cultural Anthropology; Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97631 (URN)
Available from: 2014-12-28 Created: 2014-12-28 Last updated: 2016-06-08Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, R. J. (2014). Mytologins inskränkthet [Review]. Vasabladet (25 september), 21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mytologins inskränkthet
2014 (Swedish)In: Vasabladet, ISSN 1458-4492, no 25 september, 21- p.Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

The ongoing mythologizing of the poet in both criticism and, as recently in a play produced by Wasa teater (Vasa), is reductive, and needs to be confronted. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
HSS Media-bolagen Ab, 2014
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-93582 (URN)
Available from: 2014-09-25 Created: 2014-09-25 Last updated: 2014-10-06Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, R. J. (2014). Resan som hänförelse: Erla Hovilainen-Husgafvels berättelse "Brevet från Afrika" i historisk och biografisk kontext. In: Maria Sandin (Ed.), Vertikal 3: Tema: Horisonter (pp. 38-49). Vasa: Svenska Österbottens Litteraturförening.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resan som hänförelse: Erla Hovilainen-Husgafvels berättelse "Brevet från Afrika" i historisk och biografisk kontext
2014 (Swedish)In: Vertikal 3: Tema: Horisonter / [ed] Maria Sandin, Vasa: Svenska Österbottens Litteraturförening , 2014, 38-49 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Finland-Swedish ethnologist Erla Husgafvel's story 'Brevet från Afrika' ('The Letter from Africa') is a re-telling of an authentic episode from her mother's early life (1880's), about the exaltic impact of the turning up of a letter from her missionary sister in northern Namibia. As Husgafvel originally published her 'letter' in a Christmas bulletin for Ostrobothnian soldiers at the Russian war front in 1944, it reads as a secular consolation in its juxtaposing, almost blashemously,  the causes for confronting death, the dying for the present Coming of God alternatively for your country. It is brave statement about life. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vasa: Svenska Österbottens Litteraturförening, 2014
Keyword
Africa, mission, death and its ethics, the Finnish wars, storytelling
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography; History Of Sciences and Ideas; Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-93423 (URN)978-952-68211-0-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-09-21 Created: 2014-09-21 Last updated: 2014-09-30Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, R. J. (2014). Samuel Ödmann, 1750-1829. In: Lars Kleberg (Ed.), Svenskt översättarlexikon: . Huddinge: Södertörns högskolebibliotek.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Samuel Ödmann, 1750-1829
2014 (Swedish)In: Svenskt översättarlexikon / [ed] Lars Kleberg, Huddinge: Södertörns högskolebibliotek , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Samuel Ödmann's (1750-1829) was a Linnean by affection, professor at Upsala University, theologian, writer of hymns, and armchair traveler stuck to his sick bed for four decades. Ödmann's production has a global reach: he translated among others Jacob Cook, William Bligh, Mungo Park, Robert Norris, John White, and John Gabriel Stedman, and took a special interest in Africa. I focus on his translational and colonial methods of acculturalization and his ways of popularizing his source texts through acts of paraphrasing and editing 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Huddinge: Södertörns högskolebibliotek, 2014
Keyword
eighteenth-century translation
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-85660 (URN)
Note

Publicerad 2014-02-06

Available from: 2014-02-08 Created: 2014-02-08 Last updated: 2014-02-10Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, R. (2014). Språk som kannibalism. Språk som översättning. In: Frans-Michael Kirsch, Per-Åke Lindblom och Arne Rubensson (Ed.), Guld i strupen?: Rötter och relationer till svenska språket. Stockholm: Språkförsvaret.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Språk som kannibalism. Språk som översättning
2014 (Swedish)In: Guld i strupen?: Rötter och relationer till svenska språket / [ed] Frans-Michael Kirsch, Per-Åke Lindblom och Arne Rubensson, Stockholm: Språkförsvaret , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Språkförsvaret, 2014
Keyword
cannibalism as language, language as translation, biography as language, Finland-Swedish, meänkieli
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
History Of Sciences and Ideas; Social and Economic Geography; Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-93605 (URN)9789163766480 (ISBN)
Note

Cannibalism and translation, the two concepts that act as theoretical stanchions of this chapter essay, refer to the cultural or national condition where a majority language in pursuance of centric dominance undermines the minority and where translation in its meaning of egalitarian transferring contests the absorption or the total annihilation that may follow. I use my first language acquisition as a biological trek to discuss variances of these two antagonistic activities in motion. At a very early age, around six or seven, I understood the power structure of language differentiation when I was to be mobbed by my school mates for mispronouncing the local dialect word for the 'egg,' using my migrant mother's argot. She had moved from the neighboring village marrying my father. Ten years later, this kid stuff but painful experience transformed into an issue of othering that I could barely handle intellectually. It was when the school faculty decided to ban – demonstratively for a week – our dialects in preference for the standardized Swedish, as they felt that we otherwise never would learn the 'pure' Finland-Swedish. But we, mostly peasant sons and daughters coming out of the villages, liked our tongues. I remember my anger at the time and discovered opposition as a medium or rather, as I see it today, the creative energies that otherness can develop at its best. Some ten years later, now teaching English and French, at the Haparanda gymnasium (a small frontier city), these insights conditioned by my bilingual (or was it tri-lingual?) background were to open up for me and my students, as it had done for numerous Tornedalen activists, teachers, and scholars already, the rightfulness of the river valley people to not only speak their kind of Finnish but to engage in a 'postcolonial' struggle for the authorization of 'meänkieli' as one of the five Swedish national minority languages. In the latter part of the essay I discuss how this biographical avenue lead me into African studies and translation studies, and recently into debates in Finnish media about cannibalism, of how the Swedish-speaking domains in Finland are withering and the country losing part of its anima.  

Available from: 2014-09-28 Created: 2014-09-28 Last updated: 2015-05-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications