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Peeters, J. (2017). Perpetual perspectives: on designing for aesthetic engagement. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: RISE Interactive
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perpetual perspectives: on designing for aesthetic engagement
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Oändliga perspektiv : att designa för estetiskt engagemang
Abstract [en]

This dissertation investigates aesthetics of engagement in -interaction. Aesthetic refers to the aesthetic experience, based on a phenomenological and pragmatist understanding: dynamic and personal, appealing mutually to - and formed inseparably by - our bodily, emotional, as well as intellectual faculties. Engagement signifies this experience as forming a deeply involved relationship between people and an artefact in interaction. The theoretical background upon which this work is based, asserts that we perceive the world in terms of how we can act in it. Action, through the body, is how we make sense of the world around us. To be congruent with these foundations and the topic at hand means that the research program was investigated through a constructive design research process. The research program anchors and outlines the goal of this investigation: to contribute shareable knowledge of how to design for aesthetic engagement in interaction by leveraging a first-person -perspective. The findings of this research form two contributions to the overlapping fields of Human-Computer Interaction and (Interaction) Design Research.

The main contribution is methodological and is concerned with generating knowledge through design. The methodological structure of this dissertation builds on a programmatic approach that centres on the first-person perspective of the designer, who learns from experience by reflecting on design action. Such an approach is fundamental to the design tradition, but its dependency on subjectivity is also a source of epistemological conflict since design, as mode of inquiry, matures and comes in contact with more established disciplines that have their own academic traditions. For design research, to develop its own intellectual culture, alternative and bidirectional relationships between theory and practice need to be further shaped, articulated, and debated in the field. This dissertation contributes to this discussion around designerly ways of knowing by exposing how skillful coping and intuition, through mechanisms of reflection-on-action, generate a multitude of perspectives on a complex design space. These perspectives reveal parts of the complexity of designing for aesthetic engagement, while leaving it intact. Exposing and consolidating the first-person (design) knowledge embedded in these perspectives allows this knowledge to be articulated as a shareable academic knowledge contribution.

This shareable knowledge forms the second contribution of this dissertation. Reflections on the process and results of eight constructive design research projects describe a design space around aesthetic engagement. Individual reflections are consolidated into themes that describe how a design may elicit aesthetic engagement in interaction. These themes are experiential qualities: conceptual values that can be leveraged for a design to appeal to both mind and body in ways that are rich, open-ended and ambiguous. The findings propose strategies for interactions with digital technologies to open up the complexity of relations in the world between artefacts and people. Designing for aesthetics of engagement proposes ways to respect people’ skills in making sense of the complexity of the lived world. In respecting the uniqueness of their body and the subjectivity of their experiences, to design for aesthetic engagement is to support the expression of personal points of view in interaction. This points to ways in which designers can open up interactions with digital technologies to be more beautiful, respectful, and liveable, as it touches what makes us human: our personal being in the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: RISE Interactive, 2017. p. 288
Series
Research reports in informatics, ISSN 1401-4572
Keywords
interaction design, embodiment, embodied interaction design, design research, aesthetic interaction, aesthetic engagement, engagement
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129865 (URN)978-91-7601-625-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-01-25, Flexhallen, Bildmuseet, Umeå, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Peeters, J., Kuenen, C. & Trotto, A. (2017). Unveiling the Expressivity of Complexity: Drifting in Design Research. In: Miguel Bruns Alonso and Elif Ozcan (Ed.), Proceedings of the Conference on Design and Semantics of Form and Movement - Sense and Sensitivity, DeSForM 2017: . Paper presented at DeSForM 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unveiling the Expressivity of Complexity: Drifting in Design Research
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Conference on Design and Semantics of Form and Movement - Sense and Sensitivity, DeSForM 2017 / [ed] Miguel Bruns Alonso and Elif Ozcan, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Design research is regarded to be a mode of inquiry particularly suited to engage with complex topics. In our work, we are interested in unpacking the complexity at the heart of an embodied aesthetic experience. In this article, through our digital and physical artefacts and a methodological reflection, we illustrate an ongoing design research project that a multi-disciplinary team of interaction designers, professional dancers, software developers, artists and 3D modelling experts are carrying out to develop insights on how to understand this complexity and how to use such insights as inspiration for interaction design-related projects. By embracing combinations of design, new technologies and simple visualisation tools, the project investigates the complex and hidden expressivity embedded in the skills of dancers in a programmatic design research approach. This investigation leads to insights on different levels. Firstly, cycles of formulation, realisation and reflection on design programs express parts of this complexity and this lets new research interests emerge. Secondly, as a body of work, reflecting on these cycles exposes how our “drifting” within this programmatic approach has started to unveil the complexities inherent in our research program. In this article we aim at contributing to the growing understanding of what designerly ways of knowing might be and how a practice aimed at expanding and contributing such knowledge unfolds.

Keywords
constructive design research, drifting, embodiment, aesthetics, complexity
National Category
Interaction Technologies Design
Research subject
Aesthetics; design; Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144751 (URN)10.5772/intechopen.71123 (DOI)978-953-51-3588-3 (ISBN)978-953-51-3587-6 (ISBN)
Conference
DeSForM 2017
Available from: 2018-02-13 Created: 2018-02-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Peeters, J., Trotto, A. & Kuenen, S. (2016). Mocap tango: traces of complexity. In: Proceedings of Tenth International Conferencee on Tangible Embodied and Embedded Interaction: . Paper presented at Tangible Embodied and Embedded Interaction, TEI 2016, February 14-17, 2016, Eindhoven, the Netherlands (pp. 545-550). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mocap tango: traces of complexity
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of Tenth International Conferencee on Tangible Embodied and Embedded Interaction, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 545-550Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we report on an ongoing design research project MoCap Tango. Tango is a form of partner dancing in which two bodies sense each other in a dynamic, physical dialogue that is known for its subtle complexities, beauty and intimate experience. In MoCap Tango, we explore how we can use our skills as designers to highlight and unravel these embedded qualities and use them as inspiration in designing interactions. Using an optical Motion Capture System and custom-made passive markers, the movements of two world-class tango dancers are visualized in real- time. We present our motivation for this project, describe the first prototype and conclude with reflections on what this prototype revealed in terms of design opportunities and its relevance for the TEI community. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016
Keywords
embodiment, design research, experience, dance, tango, performance, visualisation
National Category
Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117891 (URN)10.1145/2839462.2856544 (DOI)000390588700075 ()978-1-4503-3582-9 (ISBN)
Conference
Tangible Embodied and Embedded Interaction, TEI 2016, February 14-17, 2016, Eindhoven, the Netherlands
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Marti, P., Peeters, J., Trotto, A., Tittarelli, M., True, N., Papworth, N. & Hummels, C. (2015). Embodying culture: Interactive installation on women’s rights. First Monday, 20(4), Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodying culture: Interactive installation on women’s rights
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2015 (English)In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed) [Artistic work] Published
Abstract [en]

The paper describes an interactive installation exploring perspectives on women’s rights, triggering visitors’ personal reflections through an immersive experience. Starting from the life histories of the women depicted in three paintings from fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth century, we explored three themes: emancipation, self-determination and violence. In the installation, representations of these three paintings were fragmented into panels, floating in the space suspended from a self-standing structure. On these elements, both the original painting and a writhing of visual material were dynamically displayed using a projector. The presence and movement of visitors in the room was tracked by means of a Kinect™ camera and influenced both the position and movements of the panels. A software crawler monitored discussions and debates on social networks. The intensity of these discussions was reflected in the movements of the panels and the content of the projections. The purpose of this interactive installation is to engage visitors in composing a harmonious picture of the complex domain of women’s rights. The experiential form confronts visitors with the opinions of other people debating the theme worldwide. The installation was the outcome of a craft-inspired learning module, grounded on constructivism and reflective practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
First Monday, 2015
Keywords
Interaction Design; Embodiment; Aesthetics; Women's Rights; Installation; Experience
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Aesthetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-115881 (URN)10.5210/fm.v20i4.5897 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-05 Created: 2016-02-05 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Marti, P., Peeters, J. & Trotto, A. (2015). Ethics and aesthetics: experiencing women rights. In: Design and semantics of form and movement: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Design and Semantics of Form and Movement. Paper presented at the 9th International Conference on Design and Semantics of Form and Movement, DESFORM2015, AESTHETICS OF INTERACTION DYNAMIC, MULTISENSORY, WISE Politecnico di Milano (Italy) 13-17 October 2015 (pp. 339-341).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethics and aesthetics: experiencing women rights
2015 (English)In: Design and semantics of form and movement: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Design and Semantics of Form and Movement, 2015, p. 339-341Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we describe an interactive exhibition entitled Ballade of Women that explored perspectives on women’s rights. The installation was designed as an immersive experience aimed at engaging visitors to trigger meaningful and personal reflections on women’s rights. Visitors moved through a dynamic environment, where they experienced three themes: violence, emancipation and self-determination, represented by three artworks. Digital representations of the three paintings were fragmented in moving panels. The movement of the panels was determined by the movement and presence of visitors as well as by the input received by online communities discussing the topic of the exhibition. The installation created awareness, and stimulated reflection through a bodily involvement, demonstrating how complex and controversial taking a position on such topics can be. The experience concurred in stimulating and reinforcing a reflection on their relevance, complexity and universality.

National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117892 (URN)
Conference
the 9th International Conference on Design and Semantics of Form and Movement, DESFORM2015, AESTHETICS OF INTERACTION DYNAMIC, MULTISENSORY, WISE Politecnico di Milano (Italy) 13-17 October 2015
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Papworth, N., Marti, P., Trotto, A. & Peeters, J. (2014). Ballade of women: the expedition. In: Proceedings of the third International Symposium on Pervasive Displays: . Paper presented at Symposium on Pervasive Displays - PerDis 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ballade of women: the expedition
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the third International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

This video illustrates the exhibition “Ballade of Women” that took places in Siena at the Fondazione Monte de’ Paschi in June 2014. The exhibition is, and elicits, a reflection on women’s rights: self- determination, emancipation and habeas corpus. It is an exploration on how these themes are represented and perceived in a dialogue between materiality and online content. The exhibition contains an interactive installation, which plays with the concept of fragmentation. It shows how complex and articulated such themes are. This it achieves by actively engaging visitors in a dynamic visual and auditory conversation. The video [1] documents the complete experience of the exhibition. 

National Category
Design Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117893 (URN)
Conference
Symposium on Pervasive Displays - PerDis 2016
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Peeters, J., Trotto, A., Kuenen, S., Hummels, C. & Papworth, N. (2014). Touchme!, diffractme!. In: Proceedings of Design Research Society Conference. "Design's Big Debates": . Paper presented at Design Research Society Conference. DRS2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Touchme!, diffractme!
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2014 (English)In: Proceedings of Design Research Society Conference. "Design's Big Debates", 2014Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

In this poster we present an engaging, interactive lighting installation entitled DiffractMe!. The design process for DiffractMe! was based on skill-based techniques, aiming to extract subtle yet profound experiential qualities from everyday perceptual motor-skills, in order to design and build engaging interactions. The installation consists of a frame and two interaction columns. The frame houses moveable transparent prisms, Rendering a complex and colourful light projection. Each interaction column features a transparent surface that visitors can manipulate, using their hands. These movements influence the movement of the prisms, and provide a type of force-feedback to the other interaction surface. This allows us to explore the qualities of engagement in this design on three levels: Firstly, visitors engage with the installation themselves, through a subtle, haptic interaction that allows them to play with light diffraction. Secondly, visitors at one installation engage with each other, in a subtle, haptic dialogue that makes them aware of, and involved in, each other’s movements. Thirdly, the dynamic and colourful light projection has a profound effect on the space surrounding the installation, enticing and engaging passers-by to become involved. 

Keywords
design, design research, skills, DiS, embodiment
National Category
Design Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117896 (URN)
Conference
Design Research Society Conference. DRS2014
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Trotto, A., Marti, P., Papworth, N., Peeters, J., Tittarelli, M., Hummels, C., . . . Nilbrink, F. (2013). Ballade of Women: embodiment to trigger active knowledge. In: Proceedings of NODEM: . Paper presented at NODEM13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ballade of Women: embodiment to trigger active knowledge
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2013 (English)In: Proceedings of NODEM, 2013Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

Ballade of Women is an interactive exhibition that aims at exploring human rights from a female perspective.

It leverages on the concept of engagement through embodiment. Visitors of the exhibition are actors of the dynamic landscape that shapes around them and because of them. Visitors, through their sensitivity, interact with the installation, in a continuous dynamic, meaningful dialogue. They learn, grow and form a stance, because they are actively engaged in what they experience, in the dynamic space.

In one space, the three original paintings are presented and, in another, an interactive installation that plays and elaborates on the themes of each of the three paintings is located. In the installation, representations of these three painting are fragmented, and float in the space, much as the information we have about their subjects has been fragmented by history and politics and the speed of our world. Set on rotating spindles, these fragments resist attempts by the viewer to capture them as a whole. The screens only provide a complete view of the paintings at selected times and from specific view-points in the room. When the screens are positioned in a fragmented way, they display media coming from online groups, discussing issues addressed in the exhibition. The screens’ movement is influenced by the physical presence of observers and by the online discussions.  Software continuously monitors news related to the treated themes and how these are addressed through posts and online discussions. The number of threads created from the internet is an input for the installation and influences the speed of movements and informative content. The soundscape allows the viewer to pick up fragments of the play of a selection of poems, related to the three themes. Verses are whispered and vanish, immediately after being heard.

This dynamic experience suggests that each of us can contribute to compose a harmonious picture of the complex and controversial world of women's rights, by approaching it, and by being confronted with points of view of other people, facing the same topics from different perspectives all over the world.

Keywords
exhibition, embodiment, experience, women's rights, installation, interaction design
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Design Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117898 (URN)
Conference
NODEM13
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07
Marti, P., Trotto, A., Peeters, J. & Hummels, C. (2013). Instilling cultural values throgh bodily engagement with human rights. In: Proceedings of Conference of Human Computer Interaction Italy: . Paper presented at Conference of Human Computer Interaction Italy. CHI’13, April 27 – May 2, 2013, Paris, France.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Instilling cultural values throgh bodily engagement with human rights
2013 (English)In: Proceedings of Conference of Human Computer Interaction Italy, 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

The paper presents vision, approach and outcomes of “Light through Culture”, an international design school that aims at weaving, through design, innovative technologies and culture into a new canvas for making and thinking [6]. In this paper we present the second edition of the school that explored the theme of human rights and designed ways of eliciting the experience of their violation, with the realization of an experiential path through five interactive spaces, in an exhibition called “Experiencing Human Rights”. The students built this interactive path to elicit a rich experience and unfold new opportunities for meaning to be elaborated by visitors. Story telling was used, as a way of creating a holistic experience that was not just based on the narration of facts but also exploited feelings and deep cultural values through embodied interaction. Based on the student’s craftsmanship and their different cultural and educational backgrounds, they opened up a reflection on human rights, both in their own process, as well as for the visitors during the exhibition. The students’ learning activity held Making in its core, and students were encouraged, through cycles of reflection-on-action, to develop their personal point-of-view, take responsibility for it and present the designed exhibition to the visitors, to invite them to be bodily engaged, reflect and take their own point-of-view. 

National Category
Architecture Human Computer Interaction Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117900 (URN)
Conference
Conference of Human Computer Interaction Italy. CHI’13, April 27 – May 2, 2013, Paris, France
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4566-2246

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