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Foka, A., Misharina, A., Arvidsson, V. & Gelfgren, S. (2018). Beyond humanities qua digital: Spatial and material development for digital research infrastructures. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, 33(2), 264-278
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond humanities qua digital: Spatial and material development for digital research infrastructures
2018 (English)In: Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, ISSN 2055-7671, E-ISSN 2055-768X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 264-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Universities around the world have increasingly turned to digital infrastructures as a way to revamp the arts and humanities. This article contributes a fresh understanding by examining the material development of HumlabX, a research laboratory for digital humanities at Umeå University, Sweden. Specifically, we approach the empirical case as a timeline of research funding, projects, events, and deliverables to examine how the research laboratory as an organizational and material space developed and evolved in relation to new technology investments. Based on our analysis, we argue that while digital research infrastructures can, indeed, stimulate innovation in and around research, aimed to produce new knowledge, digital technologies carry social and material implications that affect organizational processes. We show that while knowledge production processes at HumlabX were highly influenced by the infrastructural legacy of the past, they indeed directed scholars toward innovation. By discussing these implications in detail, we move beyond the debate of humanities qua digital, and demonstrate the need for scholars of digital humanities to engage in the development of policies for digital research infrastructures. Using a Swedish case study, we argue that research laboratories for the digital humanities must be scrutinized and should be fully exposed as socio-material organizations that develop, and should develop, over time. In particular, we stress the need to ensure that digital humanities laboratories are sustainable and open for redevelopment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
Digital research Infrastructure, digital humanities, research, organisation studies
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified History of Technology Architecture Design Other Social Sciences
Research subject
digital humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135405 (URN)10.1093/llc/fqx008 (DOI)000443559100003 ()
Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Foka, A. (2018). The digital aesthetic in 'Atlantis: the evidence' (2010). In: Fiona Hobden and Amanda Wringley (Ed.), Ancient Greece on British television: (pp. 187-202). Edinburgh, Scotland: Edinburgh University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The digital aesthetic in 'Atlantis: the evidence' (2010)
2018 (English)In: Ancient Greece on British television / [ed] Fiona Hobden and Amanda Wringley, Edinburgh, Scotland: Edinburgh University Press, 2018, p. 187-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh, Scotland: Edinburgh University Press, 2018
Series
Screening Antiquity
Keywords
Visualization, Documentary, Digital Aesthetic, Ancient Greece, Bronze age minoans
National Category
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History Other Humanities not elsewhere specified History of Technology Studies on Film Visual Arts Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126166 (URN)9781474412599 (ISBN)9781474412612 (ISBN)9781474412605 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Foka, A. (2017). Deconstructing Oedipus: Woody Allen's Mighty Aphrodite and the classical tradition (11ed.). In: Eran Almagor and Lisa Maurice (Ed.), The reception of ancient virtues and vices in modern popular culture: beauty, bravery, blood and glory (pp. 167-186). Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deconstructing Oedipus: Woody Allen's Mighty Aphrodite and the classical tradition
2017 (English)In: The reception of ancient virtues and vices in modern popular culture: beauty, bravery, blood and glory / [ed] Eran Almagor and Lisa Maurice, Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2017, 11, p. 167-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter examines the philosophical dichotomy between Hellenism and Hebraism in order to show how Mighty Aphrodite may be seen as a contemporary example of merging cultural identities, previously thought in contradiction to one another. Allen's reiteration of Oedipal references may be read as a dismantling of Classical Hellenic culture and a rearrangement intended for a 21st century New York setting. Allen constructs a fictional tragic space that is embedded in the main plot and that manifests itself in the form of tragic dramaturgy and scenic conventions.

Against this backdrop, Allen's overall use of classical tradition may be considered self-referential: it points out to the director's own understanding of classical culture as a twenty first century Jewish New York film director. Ancient cultural forms mingle with contemporary film and mirror 'the two way relationship between the source text or culture and the new work and receiving elements'. Abort of their original context of antiquity, ritual, drama and myth, tragedy and the very figure of Oedipus are (paradoxically) cinematically deconstructed as humorous, and are granted a place within contemporaneity, finding a specific leeway of expression in classical Hollywood film narratives. The film is a commentary on the potentials of reinstating dominant structures of classical reception per se: Oedipus may become Anti-Oedipus, tragedy may turn into comedy and binary structures such as Hellenism and Hebraism may mingle together in perfect harmony.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2017 Edition: 11
Series
Metaforms, ISSN 2212-9405 ; 11
Keywords
Tragedy, Allen, New York City, Deleuze, Guattari, Hellenism, Hebraism, Reason
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion History of Ideas Philosophy Performing Art Studies Studies on Film
Research subject
Aesthetics; History Of Sciences and Ideas; History Of Sciences and Ideas; Philosophy of Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135411 (URN)10.1163/9789004347724_008 (DOI)9789004347717 (ISBN)9789004347724 (ISBN)
Projects
Multiple Screens as Material
Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Foka, A., Katerelou, A., Kelaidis, K. & Xekalaki, G. (2017). Digital Archaeology? Greece on Focus: Tools, methodologies and trends. Athens, 125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital Archaeology? Greece on Focus: Tools, methodologies and trends
2017 (English)Other (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Archaeology is an interdisciplinary science, as it is a scholarly study of past processes that often combines space, place, natural science, materials and texts in its interpretation. Presently, the majority of practicing archaeologists include digital tools in their work (e.g. data keeping, digital mapping, visualization tools). And recently, digital visualization is trending beyond 3D modelling and landscape reconstruction and into the interactive, scientific visualization of data in order to render relations between geographies and cultures, sensory properties (Betts 2011, Betts 2017, Foka and Arvidsson 2016), external /internal networks and aerial visualizations. On an international level, we have come to speak of the notion of “cyber-archaeology” (Forte 2015): archaeological methods that utilize participatory technology to interact with past artefacts and spaces and to understand the past through reflection and cooperative efforts. Current digital tools and methodologies help capture and display knowledge about the past. While there is considerable room for improvement, both in terms of tools and of methodologies, from composing plain databases to visualizations intended for wider museum audiences, we address here the current progress within Greek archaeological practice and emphasize the importance of sustainable and updated digital research infrastructures in order to enhance access to materials for researchers and laypeople alike.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Athens: , 2017
Series
Archaeology & Arts
Keywords
digital archaeology, European research infrastructures, Museology, digital repositories, 3D artefacts, digital humanities
National Category
Archaeology Classical Archaeology and Ancient History Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Archaeology; digital humanities; Classical Archaeology and Ancient History; museology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140100 (URN)
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gelfgren, S. & Foka, A. (2017). Visualisering som verktyg och metod för historieforskning. In: Per Olov Erixon & Julia Pennlert (Ed.), Digital humaniora: humaniora i en digital tid (pp. 147-164). Göteborg: Daidalos
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualisering som verktyg och metod för historieforskning
2017 (Swedish)In: Digital humaniora: humaniora i en digital tid / [ed] Per Olov Erixon & Julia Pennlert, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2017, p. 147-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Daidalos, 2017
Keywords
digital visualizations, digital history, geospatial analysis GIS, senses in history
National Category
History History of Technology Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Research subject
digital humanities; History; History Of Sciences and Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126157 (URN)978-91-7173-524-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Chapman, A., Foka, A. & Westin, J. (2017). What is historical game studies?. Rethinking history, 21(3), 358-371
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is historical game studies?
2017 (English)In: Rethinking history, ISSN 1364-2529, E-ISSN 1470-1154, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 358-371Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
game studies, history, historical game studies
National Category
History of Technology Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Research subject
History; Computer and Information Science; digital humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127299 (URN)10.1080/13642529.2016.1256638 (DOI)000404868900004 ()
Projects
Multiple Screens as MaterialMedia PlacesDigitala Modeller
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 1640
Available from: 2016-11-06 Created: 2016-11-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nygren, T., Foka, A. & Buckland, P. I. (2016). El status quo de las humanidades digitales en Suecia: Pasado, presente y futuro de la historia digital. In: Fernando Sossai and Juan Andrés Bresciano (Ed.), El conocimiento histórico en el ciberespacio [The historical knowledge on the cyberspace]: prácticas académicas y proyección social [academic practices and social diffusion] (pp. 85-126). Bucarein, Joinville: Univille University press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>El status quo de las humanidades digitales en Suecia: Pasado, presente y futuro de la historia digital
2016 (Spanish)In: El conocimiento histórico en el ciberespacio [The historical knowledge on the cyberspace]: prácticas académicas y proyección social [academic practices and social diffusion] / [ed] Fernando Sossai and Juan Andrés Bresciano, Bucarein, Joinville: Univille University press , 2016, p. 85-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bucarein, Joinville: Univille University press, 2016
Keywords
Digital Humanities, Digital History, Sweden, Scandinavia
National Category
History Other Humanities
Research subject
digital humanities; History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125081 (URN)978-9974-743-08-3 (ISBN)
Projects
multiple screens as material
Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-05 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Foka, A. & Arvidsson, V. (2016). Experiential Analogies: A Sonic Digital Ekphrasis as a Digital Humanities Project. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 10(2), Article ID UNSP 24.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiential Analogies: A Sonic Digital Ekphrasis as a Digital Humanities Project
2016 (English)In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 10, no 2, article id UNSP 24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Humanistic uses of digital technologies have opened up new ways to think about, communicate, and discuss historical research. The common use of digital tools to visually represent ancient cultures and sites, however, has also introduced new issues. For example, critics have argued that digital visualisations, largely synonymous with reconstruction in 3D models, often attempt to represent a photorealistic-artificial vision of the past, and may often prove to be a way to communicate history to a large(r) audience [Forte and Siliotti 1997]. Against this backdrop, this article will discuss precisely how technology may help immerse researchers into historically situated life, and radically advance historical research. Adding to related criticisms of ocularcentric traditions of knowledge production, we contribute to this stream of research by arguing that contemporary visual representations of the past often concentrate on visual representations and seemingly maintain antiquity as a sanitised historio-cultural ideal [Westin 2012] [Tziovas 2014]. More specifically, this article seeks to demonstrate the potential of digital humanities to move beyond mere representations on screen and to mobilize other senses (specifically sound) as a historically situated component for research. For this purpose, we focus on the abstract principles and overall methodology for a recreation of the experience of sounds in the Roman amphitheatre.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Boston: Alliance Digital Humanities Organizations, 2016
Keywords
Immersion, Digital Humanities, Senses, Classics
National Category
History and Archaeology Other Humanities Arts Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History; History Of Sciences and Ideas; medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122402 (URN)000383450000003 ()
Projects
Digital Bread and Circuses
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, F15-1371:1
Available from: 2016-06-16 Created: 2016-06-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Foka, A. (2015). Beyond Deviant: Theodora as the Other in Byzantine Imperial Historiography. In: Mäntymaki, T., Rodi-Risberg, M., Foka, A. (Ed.), Deviant Women: Cultural, Linguistic and Literary Approaches to Narratives of Femininity. Oxford: Peter Lang Publishing Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond Deviant: Theodora as the Other in Byzantine Imperial Historiography
2015 (English)In: Deviant Women: Cultural, Linguistic and Literary Approaches to Narratives of Femininity / [ed] Mäntymaki, T., Rodi-Risberg, M., Foka, A., Oxford: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Early Byzantine historiography offers two contradictory portrayals of Theodora  (Crowned Empress 427-458 CE).  Whereas in Procopius’ Wars of Justinian and Buildings she appears to be a courageous and influential empress, in his later work, Secret History, she is represented as a deviant female figure. Procopius’ narrative of Theodora is overall disapproving of her character and actions. He discusses her early years as a ‘shameless’ performer and a prostitute, brought up in the social margins of Constantinople; Similarly, during her reign, he describes her exercise of power over the palace and her subjects as cruel and violent, driven by premeditated self-interest.  In this chapter, I aim to discuss Theodora’s portrayal by Procopius as a sociologically deviant female; it is a systematic study of what the author considers to be social norm violations that are subject to social sanction. I will specifically concentrate on Theodora’s depiction as a sexually deviant young performer. I will then focus upon actions of cruelty and violence in her political and social career as an Empress.  I will show how the paradigm of Theodora, in Procopius’ Secret History, can be read as both making visible coercive social, political and religious power structures, as well as, disenfranchising femininity in early Byzantium.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015
Keywords
Theodora, Sexuality, Violence, Historiography, Gender Studies
National Category
History Cultural Studies Classical Archaeology and Ancient History Sociology
Research subject
genusvetenskap; Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-98670 (URN)ISBN 978-3-631-64329-7 pb. (Softcover) (ISBN)ISBN 978-3-653-03319-9 (eBook) (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-01-26 Created: 2015-01-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07
Westin, J., Foka, A. & Chapman, A. (Eds.). (2015). Challenge the past / diversify the future: Proceedings of the International Conference: Centre for Digital Humanities at Gothenburg University. Paper presented at Challenge the Past/Diversify the Future. Gothenburg: HUMlab
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenge the past / diversify the future: Proceedings of the International Conference: Centre for Digital Humanities at Gothenburg University
2015 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Challenge the Past / Diversify the Future is a multidisciplinary conference for scholars and practitioners who study the implementation and potential of visual and multi-sensory representations to challenge and diversify our understanding of history and culture. This volume contains an overview of all the presentations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gothenburg: HUMlab, 2015. p. 115
Series
Centrum för digital humaniora
Keywords
Heritage Studies History Game studies Archaeology Museology Art
National Category
History and Archaeology Other Humanities History of Technology History Other Engineering and Technologies
Research subject
Archaeology; Classical Archaeology and Ancient History; Computer and Information Science; History; museology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100873 (URN)
Conference
Challenge the Past/Diversify the Future
Projects
Multiple Screens as MaterialChallenge the past/diversify the future
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, F14-1635:1
Available from: 2015-03-12 Created: 2015-03-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9949-616x

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