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Jacobsson, Maritha
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Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Silfver, E., Maritha, J., Arnell, L., Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, H., Härgestam, M., Sjöberg, M. & Widding, U. (2018). Classroom bodies: affect, body language, and discourse when schoolchildren encounter national tests in mathematics. Gender and Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classroom bodies: affect, body language, and discourse when schoolchildren encounter national tests in mathematics
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2018 (English)In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to analyse how Swedish grade three children are discursively positioned as pupils when they are taking national tests in mathematics and when they reflect on the testing situation afterwards. With support from theories about affective-discursive assemblages, we explore children's body language, emotions, and talk in light of the two overarching discourses that we believe frame the classroom: the 'testing discourse' and the 'development discourse'. Through the disciplinary power of these main discourses children struggle to conduct themselves in order to become recognized as intelligible subjects and 'ideal pupils'. The analysis, when taking into account how affects and discourses intertwine, shows that children can be in 'untroubled', 'troubled', or ambivalent subject positions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
affective-discursive assemblages, grade three children, ‘ideal’ pupils, mathematics tests, power
National Category
Pedagogy Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147753 (URN)10.1080/09540253.2018.1473557 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2019-07-08
Fromholz, E. & Jacobsson, M. (2018). Humanjuridik. Tidsskrift for rettsvitenskap, 131(1), 104-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Humanjuridik
2018 (Swedish)In: Tidsskrift for rettsvitenskap, ISSN 0040-7143, E-ISSN 1504-3096, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 104-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

I denna artikel diskuterar vi vad som avses med begreppet humanjuridik, dess innehåll och avgränsning och hur det i övrigt kan förstås. Syftet är att utveckla en teoretisk ram kring begreppet. Vår slutsats är att humanjuridiken inte betecknar något nytt rättsområde i traditionell mening, utan att det används som ett samlingsbegrepp för ett antal, inte enhetligt angivna, rättsområden som kännetecknas av en särskild problematik och som därför anses kräva annan kunskap än den strikt juridiska. Att jurister är i behov av annan kunskap än enbart juridisk sådan är en uppfattning som humanjuridiken delar med andra rättsfilosofiska strömningar. I den meningen representerar humanjuridiken inte heller någon ny kunskap. De perspektiv som dessa strömningar representerar kan ses som en reaktion på förändringar i samhället men väcker frågor om rättssäkerheten stärks eller försvagas genom dessa perspektiv, om vilken annan kompetens jurister behöver och om juristrollen i relation till andra professionsgrupper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universitetsforlaget, 2018
Keywords
Humanjuridik, terapeutisk juridik, reparativ rättvisa, rättssociologi, välfärdsrätt
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146488 (URN)10.18261/issn.1504-3096-2018-01-03 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M., Wahlin, L. & Fromholz, E. (2018). Victim offender mediation in Sweden: an activity falling apart? (1ed.). In: Anna Nylund, Kaijus Ervasti, Lin Adrian (Ed.), Nordic Mediation Research: (pp. 67-79). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Victim offender mediation in Sweden: an activity falling apart?
2018 (English)In: Nordic Mediation Research / [ed] Anna Nylund, Kaijus Ervasti, Lin Adrian, Springer, 2018, 1, p. 67-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, the government has invested considerable resources to implement victim offender mediation (VOM) for young people (under the age of 21). Despite this, the number of mediations is decreasing. What appears to be a gap between the legislator’s intentions and practical applications raises questions about the reasons for this gap and the premises for mediation in penal matters in Sweden today. Our purpose in this article is to highlight and discuss some circumstances that can explain this decrease and the future of VOM in Sweden. We start by discussing the development of VOM in Sweden and continue by analysing possible reasons for why mediation is declining. The conclusion is that the decrease can be explained by problems related to legal and organisational structures as well as mediation practice. The conclusion is also that if the state and municipalities do not show more interest in VOM and restorative justice, then this activity will probably disappear.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146328 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-73019-6_5 (DOI)978-3-319-73019-6 (ISBN)978-3-319-73018-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-04-05 Created: 2018-04-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sjöström, S., Jacobsson, M. & Hollander, A. (2017). Collegiality, therapy and mediation: the contribution of experts in Swedish mental health law. Laws, 6(1), Article ID 2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collegiality, therapy and mediation: the contribution of experts in Swedish mental health law
2017 (English)In: Laws, ISSN 0458-7251, E-ISSN 2268-1167, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Independent experts serve a vital role in how the human rights of patients are protected in mental health law. This article investigates the contribution of court-appointed psychiatrists (APs) in civil commitment court hearings. Analysis is based on 12 court hearings that were audiotaped. Supplementary informal interviews with participants were also conducted. Data were analysed through a combination of rhetoric analysis and discourse analysis. Analysis of the hearings reveals that APs do not fulfil their function to critically investigate treating psychiatrists’ (CPs) recommendations that patients meet commitment criteria. They typically do not ask any questions from CPs, and the few questions that are asked do not cast light on the legal issues at stake. To further understand the role of APs, their communication has been analyzed in terms of four interpretative repertoires: collegial, disclosing, therapeutic and mediating. In conclusion, the human rights of patients subjected to involuntary commitment might be at risk when therapeutic concerns are built into the process. The specific Swedish model where APs deliver their own assessment about whether commitment criteria are met may be counterproductive. This argument possibly extends to the role of medical members in mental health tribunals in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

Keywords
experts, court hearings, compulsory psychiatric care, civil commitment, mentla health law, human rights, therapeutic jurisprudence, non-adversarial law, interpretative repertoires
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130565 (URN)10.3390/laws6010002 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Note

This article belongs to the Special Issue The Intersection of Human Rights Law and Health Law

Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Wahlin, L. (2017). Medling vid brott: en enhetlig svensk modell?. Stiftelsen Allmänna Barnhuset
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medling vid brott: en enhetlig svensk modell?
2017 (Swedish)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stiftelsen Allmänna Barnhuset, 2017. p. 52
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142123 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hultin, M., Jacobsson, M., Brulin, C. & Härgestam, M. (2016). Kunskap och kommunikation är en ledares plattform: tvärvetenskaplig studie av traumateamövningar visar betydelsen av verbal och icke-verbal kommunikation. Läkartidningen, 113(39), 1-5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kunskap och kommunikation är en ledares plattform: tvärvetenskaplig studie av traumateamövningar visar betydelsen av verbal och icke-verbal kommunikation
2016 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no 39, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126137 (URN)
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Härgestam, M., Hultin, M., Brulin, C. & Jacobsson, M. (2016). Trauma team leaders' non-verbal communication: video registration during trauma team training. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 24, Article ID 37.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trauma team leaders' non-verbal communication: video registration during trauma team training
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 24, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is widespread consensus on the importance of safe and secure communication in healthcare, especially in trauma care where time is a limiting factor. Although non-verbal communication has an impact on communication between individuals, there is only limited knowledge of how trauma team leaders communicate. The purpose of this study was to investigate how trauma team members are positioned in the emergency room, and how leaders communicate in terms of gaze direction, vocal nuances, and gestures during trauma team training.

METHODS: Eighteen trauma teams were audio and video recorded during trauma team training in the emergency department of a hospital in northern Sweden. Quantitative content analysis was used to categorize the team members' positions and the leaders' non-verbal communication: gaze direction, vocal nuances, and gestures. The quantitative data were interpreted in relation to the specific context. Time sequences of the leaders' gaze direction, speech time, and gestures were identified separately and registered as time (seconds) and proportions (%) of the total training time.

RESULTS: The team leaders who gained control over the most important area in the emergency room, the "inner circle", positioned themselves as heads over the team, using gaze direction, gestures, vocal nuances, and verbal commands that solidified their verbal message. Changes in position required both attention and collaboration. Leaders who spoke in a hesitant voice, or were silent, expressed ambiguity in their non-verbal communication: and other team members took over the leader's tasks.

DISCUSSION:

In teams where the leader had control over the inner circle, the members seemed to have an awareness of each other's roles and tasks, knowing when in time and where in space these tasks needed to be executed. Deviations in the leaders' communication increased the ambiguity in the communication, which had consequences for the teamwork. Communication cannot be taken for granted; it needs to be practiced regularly just as technical skills need to be trained. Simulation training provides healthcare professionals the opportunity to put both verbal and non-verbal communication in focus, in order to improve patient safety.

CONCLUSIONS: Non-verbal communication plays a decisive role in the interaction between the trauma team members, and so both verbal and non-verbal communication should be in focus in trauma team training. This is even more important for inexperienced leaders, since vague non-verbal communication reinforces ambiguity and can lead to errors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Communication, Coordination, Leadership, Non-verbal communication, Time, Trauma team, Trauma team training
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108083 (URN)10.1186/s13049-016-0230-7 (DOI)000372795600002 ()27015914 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-09-03 Created: 2015-09-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Härgestam, M., Lindkvist, M., Jacobsson, M., Brulin, C. & Hultin, M. (2016). Trauma teams and time to early management during in situ trauma team training. BMJ Open, 6(1), Article ID e009911.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trauma teams and time to early management during in situ trauma team training
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2016 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 1, article id e009911Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery and gender, ethnicity, years in profession, experience of trauma team training, experience of structured trauma courses and trauma in the trauma team, as well as use of closed-loop communication and leadership styles during trauma team training.

DESIGN: In situ trauma team training. The patient simulator was preprogrammed to represent a severely injured patient (injury severity score: 25) suffering from hypovolemia due to external trauma.

SETTING: An emergency room in an urban Scandinavian level one trauma centre.

PARTICIPANTS: A total of 96 participants were divided into 16 trauma teams. Each team consisted of six team members: one surgeon/emergency physician (designated team leader), one anaesthesiologist, one registered nurse anaesthetist, one registered nurse from the emergency department, one enrolled nurse from the emergency department and one enrolled nurse from the operating theatre.

PRIMARY OUTCOME: HRs with CIs (95% CI) for the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery was computed from a Cox proportional hazards model.

RESULTS: Three variables remained significant in the final model. Closed-loop communication initiated by the team leader increased the chance of a decision to go to surgery (HR: 3.88; CI 1.02 to 14.69). Only 8 of the 16 teams made the decision to go to surgery within the timeframe of the trauma team training. Conversely, call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by the team members significantly decreased the chance of a decision to go to surgery, (HR: 0.82; CI 0.71 to 0.96, and HR: 0.23; CI 0.08 to 0.71, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: Closed-loop communication initiated by the leader appears to be beneficial for teamwork. In contrast, a high number of call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by team members might lead to a communication overload.

Keywords
Accident & Emergency Medicin, Anaesthetics, Medical Education & Training, Trauma Management
National Category
Nursing Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-115215 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009911 (DOI)000369993900144 ()26826152 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in submitted form.

Available from: 2016-02-01 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, L., Jacobsson, M. & Lämås, K. (2014). Touch massage, a rewarding experience. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 32(4), 261-268
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Touch massage, a rewarding experience
2014 (English)In: Journal of Holistic Nursing, ISSN 0898-0101, E-ISSN 1552-5724, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 261-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to describe and analyze healthy individuals’ expressed experiences of touch massage (TM). Fifteen healthy participants received whole body touch massage during 60 minutes for two separate occasions. Interviews were analyzed by narrative analysis. Four identifiable storyline was found, Touch massage as an essential need, in this storyline the participants talked about a desire and need for human touch and TM. Another storyline was about, Touch massage as a pleasurable experience and the participants talked about the pleasure of having had TM. In the third storyline Touch massage as a dynamic experience, the informants talked about things that could modulate the experience of receiving TM. In the last storyline, Touch massage influences self-awareness, the participants described how TM affected some of their psychological and physical experiences. Experiences of touch massage was in general described as pleasant sensations and the different storylines could be seen in the light of rewarding experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
touch, massage, reward system, health, qualitative content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91881 (URN)10.1177/0898010114531855 (DOI)24771663 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-18 Created: 2014-08-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, E., Jacobsson, M. & Wennberg, L. (2013). Children and Child Law at Crossroads: Intersectionality, Interdisciplinarity and Intertextuality as Analytical Tools for Legal Research. In: International Family Law, Policy and Practice: Child Law in an International Context. Paper presented at The University of Tromso’s International Conference 21-25 January 2013 (pp. 33-40). , 1(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children and Child Law at Crossroads: Intersectionality, Interdisciplinarity and Intertextuality as Analytical Tools for Legal Research
2013 (English)In: International Family Law, Policy and Practice: Child Law in an International Context, 2013, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 33-40Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Series
International Family Law, Policy and Practice ; Volume 1, Number 1, Winter 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86491 (URN)
Conference
The University of Tromso’s International Conference 21-25 January 2013
Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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