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Brulin, Christine
Publications (10 of 76) Show all publications
Hultin, M., Jonsson, K., Härgestam, M., Lindkvist, M. & Brulin, C. (2019). Reliability of instruments that measure situation awareness, team performance and task performance in a simulation setting with medical students. BMJ Open, 9(9), Article ID e029412.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reliability of instruments that measure situation awareness, team performance and task performance in a simulation setting with medical students
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2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e029412Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The assessment of situation awareness (SA), team performance and task performance in a simulation training session requires reliable and feasible measurement techniques. The objectives of this study were to test the Airways-Breathing-Circulation-Disability-Exposure (ABCDE) checklist and the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) for inter-rater reliability, as well as the application of Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique (SAGAT) for feasibility and internal consistency.

DESIGN: Methodological approach.

SETTING: Data collection during team training using full-scale simulation at a university clinical training centre. The video-recorded scenarios were rated independently by four raters.

PARTICIPANTS: 55 medical students aged 22-40 years in their fourth year of medical studies, during the clerkship in anaesthesiology and critical care medicine, formed 23 different teams. All students answered the SAGAT questionnaires, and of these students, 24 answered the follow-up postsimulation questionnaire (PSQ). TEAM and ABCDE were scored by four professionals.

MEASURES: The ABCDE and TEAM were tested for inter-rater reliability. The feasibility of SAGAT was tested using PSQ. SAGAT was tested for internal consistency both at an individual level (SAGAT) and a team level (Team Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique (TSAGAT)).

RESULTS: The intraclass correlation was 0.54/0.83 (single/average measurements) for TEAM and 0.55/0.83 for ABCDE. According to the PSQ, the items in SAGAT were rated as relevant to the scenario by 96% of the participants. Cronbach's alpha for SAGAT/TSAGAT for the two scenarios was 0.80/0.83 vs 0.62/0.76, and normed χ² was 1.72 vs 1.62.

CONCLUSION: Task performance, team performance and SA could be purposefully measured, and the reliability of the measurements was good.

Keywords
patient care team, resuscitation, situation awareness, task performance and analysis, teamwork
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163368 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-029412 (DOI)31515425 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, A., Backteman-Erlandson, S., Brulin, C. & Egan Sjölander, A. (2018). ’There is nothing wrong with diversity and equality as long as the right people are employed’. Promoting and hindering health in firefighter discourse. In: : . Paper presented at Poster presented at the 3rd Nordic Conference in Nursing Research, Methods and Networks for the future. June, Oslo, Norway..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>’There is nothing wrong with diversity and equality as long as the right people are employed’. Promoting and hindering health in firefighter discourse
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152474 (URN)
Conference
Poster presented at the 3rd Nordic Conference in Nursing Research, Methods and Networks for the future. June, Oslo, Norway.
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Jacobsson, A., Backteman-Erlandson, S., Padyab, M., Egan Sjölander, A. & Brulin, C. (2017). Burnout and association with psychosocial work environment among Swedish firefighters. Global Journal of Health Science, 9(5), 214-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burnout and association with psychosocial work environment among Swedish firefighters
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2017 (English)In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, E-ISSN 1916-9744, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 214-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Firefighters are exposed to traumatic and stressful psychosocial and physical strain in their work, and thus they are considered to be a group at high risk of burnout. The aim of this study was to investigate burnout (emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (DP) among Swedish female and male firefighters and to examine the gender-stratified relationship between psychosocial work environment and burnout when considering the moderating effect of coping strategies among Swedish firefighters. The overall mean values of both EE and DP were notably low in comparison with the general population in Sweden. We found that psychosocial work environment factors increase the risk of burnout among male firefighters. Among men, EE was associated with high demands and lack of social support in work. The association was also confirmed with DP as the outcome and lack of good leadership as the exposure among men. However, among female firefighters the association between psychosocial work environment factors and burnout failed to appear. Among women, EE and DP were only associated with the coping strategy Psychological distancing (PDi). A negative association with DP and the coping strategy Positive Reappraisal (PRe) was also found among women. Regardless of the result from the regression analyses, we must consider that the majority of the female and male firefighters in our study had low scores on the outcome variables EE and DP. Future studies should explore female and male firefighters' context and possible health-protecting environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2017
Keywords
burnout, coping strategies, firefighters, psychosocial work environment, Sweden
National Category
Nursing Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126032 (URN)10.5539/gjhs.v9n5p214 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-09-26 Created: 2016-09-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, K., Brulin, C., Grankvist, K. & Juthberg, C. (2017). Factors associated with nursing students' adherence to venous blood collection practice guidelines: A cross sectional study. Nurse Education in Practice, 23, 92-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with nursing students' adherence to venous blood collection practice guidelines: A cross sectional study
2017 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 23, p. 92-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Venous blood specimen collection is a common procedure that nursing students perform during pre-registration courses, and training for such collections takes place on campus as well as at clinical placements. However, levels of adherence to practice guidelines are still suboptimal among both nursing students and healthcare staff. We aimed to explore nursing students' adherence to the Swedish national venous blood specimen collection practice guidelines regarding patient identification and test request management and how this adherence is related to clinical experience, capability beliefs, research use,and the perceived social climate in clinical contexts. A survey with a cross-sectional design was conducted among 305 nursing students at a medium sized university in Sweden. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used for data analysis. The survey showed that 82% of the students adhered to patient identification guideline practices and 80% to test request management practices. Factors associated with correct patient identification procedures were semester and frequency of research use.Factors associated with correct test request management were previous healthcare work experience,semester, and capability beliefs regarding academic abilities and evidence-based practice. We conclude that there is a need to develop educational tools to train students in research use and evidence-based practice in order to enhance guideline practice adherence and improve patient safety.

Keywords
Guideline adherence, Patient safety, Practical skills, Venous blood specimen collection
National Category
Nursing Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120133 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2017.02.002 (DOI)000398876200014 ()28278444 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Padyab, M., Backteman-Erlanson, S. & Brulin, C. (2016). Burnout, coping, stress of conscience and psychosocial work environment among patrolling police officers. Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, 31(4), 229-237
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burnout, coping, stress of conscience and psychosocial work environment among patrolling police officers
2016 (English)In: Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, ISSN 0882-0783, E-ISSN 1936-6469, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Police personnel work under different circumstances in various environments involving stressful situations which can increase the risk of burnout. Aim of this study was to investigate the association between burnout (emotional exhaustion, EE vs. depersonalization, DP) and psychosocial work environment, stress of conscience as well as coping strategies among patrolling police officers in Sweden. Most of the independent variables; psychological demand, decision latitude, social support, and coping scales were correlated with EE and DP. A hierarchical multiple regression was performed to investigate the predictive impact of; psychological demand, decision latitude, social support, coping strategies and stress of conscience. Findings revealed that risk of EE increased with a troubled conscience for both women and men when coping strategies were added to the model. For men risk of DP increased with troubled conscience. Only low decision latitude was associated with risk of DP for women when coping strategies were added to the model. Results from this study indicate that stress of conscience has to be taken into consideration and also levels of social support and decision latitude when studying the influence of the psychosocial work environment on burnout.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Swedish police, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, stress of conscience, social support, coping
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71254 (URN)10.1007/s11896-015-9189-y (DOI)000410493800001 ()
Note

Originally published in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2013-05-23 Created: 2013-05-23 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lämås, K., Häger, C., Lindgren, L., Wester, P. & Brulin, C. (2016). Does touch massage facilitate recovery after stroke?: A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 16, Article ID 50.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does touch massage facilitate recovery after stroke?: A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial
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2016 (English)In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 16, article id 50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Despite high quality stroke care, decreased sensorimotor function, anxiety and pain often remain one year after stroke which can lead to impaired health and dependence, as well as higher healthcare costs. Touch massage (TM) has been proven to decrease anxiety and pain, and improve quality of health in other conditions of reduced health, where reduced anxiety seems to be the most pronounced benefit. Thus there are reasons to believe that TM may also reduce anxiety and pain, and improve quality of life after stroke. Further, several studies indicate that somatosensory stimulation can increase sensorimotor function, and it seems feasible to believe that TM could increase independence after stroke. In this study we will evaluate effects of TM after stroke compared to sham treatment.

METHODS: This is a prospective randomized open-labelled control trial with blinded evaluation (PROBE-design). Fifty patients with stroke admitted to stroke units will be randomized (1:1) to either a TM intervention or a non-active transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (non-TENS) control group. Ten sessions of 30 min treatments (TM or control) will be administered during two weeks. Assessment of status according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), including body function, activity, and participation. Assessment of body function will include anxiety, pain, and stress response (heart rate variability and salivary cortisol), where anxiety is the primary outcome. Activity will be assessed by means of sensorimotor function and disability, and participation by means of health-related quality of life. Assessments will be made at baseline, after one week of treatment, after two weeks of treatment, and finally a follow-up after two months. The trial has been approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board.

DISCUSSION: TM seems to decrease anxiety and pain, increase health-related quality of life, and improve sensorimotor functions after stroke, but the field is largely unexplored. Considering the documented pleasant effects of massage in general, absence of reported adverse effects, and potential effects in relation to stroke, it is essential to evaluate effects of TM during the sub-acute phase after stroke. The results of this project will hopefully provide important knowledge for evidence-based care.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NTC01883947.

Keywords
Stroke, massage, rehabilitation, body function, activity, participation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117886 (URN)10.1186/s12906-016-1029-9 (DOI)000369605300002 ()26846253 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hultin, M., Jacobsson, M., Brulin, C. & Härgestam, M. (2016). Kunskap och kommunikation är en ledares plattform: tvärvetenskaplig studie av traumateamövningar visar betydelsen av verbal och icke-verbal kommunikation. Läkartidningen, 113(39), 1-5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kunskap och kommunikation är en ledares plattform: tvärvetenskaplig studie av traumateamövningar visar betydelsen av verbal och icke-verbal kommunikation
2016 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no 39, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126137 (URN)
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Shayesteh, A., Janlert, U., Brulin, C., Boman, J. & Nylander, E. (2016). Prevalence and Characteristics of Hyperhidrosis in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study in the General Population. Dermatology, 232(5), 586-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and Characteristics of Hyperhidrosis in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study in the General Population
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2016 (English)In: Dermatology, ISSN 1018-8665, E-ISSN 1421-9832, Vol. 232, no 5, p. 586-591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Hyperhidrosis is defined as excessive sweating which can be primary or secondary. Data about the prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis are scarce for northern Europe.

OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of hyperhidrosis focusing on its primary form and describe the quality of life impairments for the affected individuals.

METHODS: Five thousand random individuals aged 18-60 years in Sweden were investigated. The individuals' addresses were obtained from Statens personadressregister, SPAR, which includes all persons who are registered as resident in Sweden. A validated questionnaire regarding hyperhidrosis including the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS) and 36-item Short Form (SF-36) health survey was sent to each individual. The participants were asked to return the coded questionnaire within 1 week.

RESULTS: A total of 1,353 individuals (564 male, 747 female and 42 with unspecified gender) with a mean age of 43.1 ± 11.2 years responded. The prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis was 5.5%, and severe primary hyperhidrosis (HDSS 3-4 points) occurred in 1.4%. Secondary hyperhidrosis was observed in 14.8% of the participants. Our SF-36 results showed that secondary hyperhidrosis causes a significant (p < 0.001) impairment of both mental and physical abilities while primary hyperhidrosis impairs primarily the mental health (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: Hyperhidrosis affects individuals in adolescence as a focal form while occurring as a generalised form with increasing age. Further, the prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis described in our study is comparable to other studies from the western hemisphere. While secondary, generalised hyperhidrosis impairs both physical and mental aspects of life, primary hyperhidrosis, with the exception of severe cases, mainly affects the mental health.

Keywords
Hyperhidrosis, Prevalence, Survey, Quality of life
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127514 (URN)10.1159/000448032 (DOI)000392167200009 ()27576462 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Shayesteh, A., Boman, J., Janlert, U., Brulin, C. & Nylander, E. (2016). Primary hyperhidrosis: Implications on symptoms, daily life, health and alcohol consumption when treated with botulinum toxin. Journal of dermatology (Print), 43(8), 928-933
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Primary hyperhidrosis: Implications on symptoms, daily life, health and alcohol consumption when treated with botulinum toxin
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2016 (English)In: Journal of dermatology (Print), ISSN 0385-2407, E-ISSN 1346-8138, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 928-933Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Primary hyperhidrosis affects approximately 3% of the population and reduces quality of life in affected persons. Few studies have investigated the symptoms of anxiety, depression and hazardous alcohol consumption among those with hyperhidrosis and the effect of treatment with botulinum toxin. The first aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary hyperhidrosis on mental and physical health, and alcohol consumption. Our second aim was to study whether and how treatment with botulinum toxin changed these effects. One hundred and fourteen patients answered questionnaires regarding hyperhidrosis and symptoms, including hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS), visual analog scale (VAS) 10-point scale for hyperhidrosis symptoms, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), alcohol use disorder identification test (AUDIT) and short-form health survey (SF-36) before treatment with botulinum toxin and 2 weeks after. The age of onset of hyperhidrosis was on average 13.4 years and 48% described heredity for hyperhidrosis. Significant improvements were noted in patients with axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis regarding mean HDSS, VAS 10-point scale, HADS, SF-36 and sweat-related health problems 2 weeks after treatment with botulinum toxin. Changes in mean AUDIT for all participants were not significant. Primary hyperhidrosis mainly impairs mental rather than physical aspects of life and also interferes with specific daily activities of the affected individuals. Despite this, our patients did not show signs of anxiety, depression or hazardous alcohol consumption. Treatment with botulinum toxin reduced sweat-related problems and led to significant improvements in HDSS, VAS, HADS and SF-36 in our patients.

Keywords
alcohol, botulinum toxin, hyperhidrosis, quality of life, Sweden
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118031 (URN)10.1111/1346-8138.13291 (DOI)000380922800010 ()26875781 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hellström Ängerud, K., Thylén, I., Sederholm Lawesson, S., Eliasson, M., Näslund, U. & Brulin, C. (2016). Symptoms and delay times during myocardial infarction in 694 patients with and without diabetes: an explorative cross-sectional study. BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, 16, Article ID 108.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptoms and delay times during myocardial infarction in 694 patients with and without diabetes: an explorative cross-sectional study
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2016 (English)In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 16, article id 108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In myocardial infarction (MI) a short pre-hospital delay, prompt diagnosis and timely reperfusion treatment can improve the prognosis. Despite the importance of timely care seeking, many patients with MI symptoms delay seeking medical care. Previous research is inconclusive about differences in symptom presentation and pre-hospital delay between patients with and without diabetes during MI. The aim of this study was to describe symptoms and patient delay during MI in patients with and without diabetes.

METHODS: Swedish cross-sectional multicentre survey study enrolling MI patients in 5 centres within 24 h from admittance.

RESULTS: Chest pain was common in patients both with and without diabetes and did not differ after adjustment for age and sex. Patients with diabetes had higher risk for shoulder pain/discomfort, shortness of breath, and tiredness, but lower risk for cold sweat. The three most common symptoms reported by patients with diabetes were chest pain, pain in arms/hands and tiredness. In patients without diabetes the most common symptoms were chest pain, cold sweat and pain in arms/hands. Median patient delay time was 2 h, 24 min for patients with diabetes and 1 h, 15 min for patients without diabetes (p = 0.024).

CONCLUSION: Chest pain was common both in patients with and without diabetes. There were more similarities than differences in MI symptoms between patients with and without diabetes but patients with diabetes had considerably longer delay. This knowledge is important not only for health care personnel meeting patients with suspected MI, but also for the education of people with diabetes.

Keywords
Myocardial infarction, Diabetes mellitus, Symptoms, Patient delay
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124451 (URN)10.1186/s12872-016-0282-7 (DOI)000380228500001 ()27386934 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-12 Created: 2016-08-12 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
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