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Nilsson, Karina
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Bortes, C., Strandh, M. & Nilsson, K. (2019). Is the effect of ill health on school achievement among Swedish adolescents gendered?. SSM - Population Health, 8, Article ID 100408.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is the effect of ill health on school achievement among Swedish adolescents gendered?
2019 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 8, article id 100408Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates why the relationship between health problems requiring hospitalization between the ages of 13 and 16 and school achievement (school grades in 9th grade) in Sweden was stronger for girls than for boys. We reviewed previous research on gender differences in subjective health, health care utilization and medical drug treatment to identify mechanisms responsible for this gendered effect. The relationship was analysed using retrospective observational data from several national full-population registers of individuals born in 1990 in Sweden (n = 115 196), and ordinary least squares techniques were used to test hypotheses. We found that girls had longer stays when hospitalized, which mediated 15% of the interaction effect. Variability in drug treatment between boys and girls did not explain the gendered effect of hospitalization. The main mediator of the gendered effect was instead differences in diagnoses between boys and girls. Girls’ hospitalizations were more commonly related to mental and behavioural diagnoses, which have particularly detrimental effects on school achievement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Sweden, Child health, Adolescent health, Disease, Mental disorders, Academic achievement, Registries, Gender differences
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163022 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2019.100408 (DOI)31289741 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Namatovu, F., Strandh, M., Ivarsson, A. & Nilsson, K. (2018). Effect of childhood coeliac disease on ninth grade school performance: evidence from a population-based study. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 103(2), 143-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of childhood coeliac disease on ninth grade school performance: evidence from a population-based study
2018 (English)In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 143-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Coeliac disease might affect school performance due to its effect on cognitive performance and related health consequences that might increase school absenteeism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with coeliac disease performed differently on completion of ninth grade in school compared with children without coeliac disease.

Methods: Analysis was performed on a population of 445 669 children born in Sweden between 1991 and 1994 of whom 1767 were diagnosed with coeliac disease. School performance at ninth grade was the outcome and coeliac disease was the exposure. Other covariates included sex, Apgar score at 5 min, small for gestational age, year of birth, family type, parental education and income.

Results: There was no association between coeliac disease and school performance at ninth grade (adjusted coefficient -2.4, 95% CI 5.1 to 0.4). A weak association was established between late coeliac diagnosis and higher grades, but this disappeared after adjusting for parent socioeconomic conditions. Being small for gestational age affected performance negatively (adjusted coefficient -6.9, 95% CI 8.0 to 5.7). Grade scores were significantly lower in children living with a single parent (adjusted coefficient -20.6, 95% CI 20.9 to 20.2), compared with those with married/cohabiting parents. A positive association was found between scores at ninth grade and parental education and income.

Conclusion: Coeliac disease diagnosis during childhood is not associated with poor school performance at ninth grade.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
Keywords
achievement, celiac, disease, education, grades, income, performance and school
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139901 (URN)10.1136/archdischild-2017-312830 (DOI)000424019400011 ()28844065 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bortes, C., Strandh, M. & Nilsson, K. (2018). Health problems during childhood and school achievement: Exploring associations between hospitalization exposures, gender, timing, and compulsory school grades. PLoS ONE, 13(12), 1-14, Article ID e0208116.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health problems during childhood and school achievement: Exploring associations between hospitalization exposures, gender, timing, and compulsory school grades
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 1-14, article id e0208116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS:

To investigate while accounting for health at birth 1) associations between health problems during childhood, measured as hospitalizations, and school achievement in the final year of compulsory school, measured as overall grade points and eligibility for upper secondary education, 2) if and how gender moderates the association between health problems and school achievement, 3) if and how the timing of a health problem during childhood is associated with later school achievement.

METHODS:

Analyzes were performed on a population-based cohort (n = 115 196) born in 1990 in Sweden (51.3% boys, 48.7% girls) using data from several national registries. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to analyze associations between study variables.

RESULTS:

Overall grade points and eligibility for continuation to upper secondary school were lower for individuals exposed to hospitalizations. Only the association between hospitalizations and overall grade points was moderated by gender and only for ages 13-16 years. Exposure close to actual grading had worst outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Health problems, measured through hospitalizations, was significantly associated with lower school achievements among Swedish children. Girls exposed to health problems requiring hospitalizations had relatively poorer school achievements as compared to boys. Health problems requiring hospitalization during junior high school had the greatest negative association with final achievement at compulsory school.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154744 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0208116 (DOI)000452212400079 ()30517159 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-1992Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0154
Available from: 2018-12-29 Created: 2018-12-29 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Chaparro, M. P., de Luna, X., Häggström, J., Ivarsson, A., Lindgren, U., Nilsson, K. & Koupil, I. (2017). Childhood family structure and women's adult overweight risk: A longitudinal study. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45(5), 511-519
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood family structure and women's adult overweight risk: A longitudinal study
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 511-519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate whether women's adult overweight and obesity risk was associated with their childhood family structure, measured as their mothers' marital status history, during the women's first 18 years of life.

METHODS: Using linked register data, we analyzed 30,584 primiparous women born in Sweden in 1975 who were between 19-35 years of age when their height and pre-pregnancy weight was recorded. The outcomes were women's overweight/obesity (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and the predictor was mothers' marital status history, which was summarized using sequence analysis. We carried out nested logistic regression models adjusting for women's age and maternal sociodemographic characteristics.

RESULTS: Mothers' marital status history was summarized into six clusters: stable marriage, stable cohabitation, married then divorcing, cohabiting then separating, varied transitions, and not with father. In fully adjusted models and compared with women whose mothers belonged to the stable marriage cluster: (1) women whose mothers belonged to the other marital status clusters had higher odds of overweight/obesity (odds ratio (OR) ranging 1.15-1.19; p < 0.05); and (2) women whose mothers belonged to the stable cohabitation (OR = 1.31; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.52), cohabiting then separating (OR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.01-1.49), varied transitions (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.11-1.39), and not with father (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.00-1.54) clusters had higher odds of obesity.

CONCLUSIONS: Women whose mothers were not in stable marriage relationships had higher odds of being overweight or obese in adulthood. The finding that even women raised in the context of stable cohabitation had higher odds of being overweight or obese is intriguing as these relationships are socially accepted in Sweden.

Keywords
family structure, marital status, overweight, obesity, Sweden, sequence analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135030 (URN)10.1177/1403494817705997 (DOI)000404652000007 ()28482752 (PubMedID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Brännlund, A., Strandh, M. & Nilsson, K. (2017). Mental-health and educational achievement: the link between poor mental-health and upper secondary school completion and grades. Journal of Mental Health, 26(4), 318-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental-health and educational achievement: the link between poor mental-health and upper secondary school completion and grades
2017 (English)In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 318-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Education profoundly affects adult socioeconomic status, so it is important to ensure that all children have the capability and opportunity to achieve educational goals.Aims: The study aimed to examine the relationship between mental-health during adolescence and upper secondary school completion and grades, which has received comparatively little research attention to date.Method: Longitudinal administrative and registered data were used to analyse the relationship between school achievement and prescriptions of psycholeptic and psycho-analeptic drugs. The sample consisted of all children born in Sweden in 1990 (n=109223), who were followed from birth to age 20. Logistic and OLS regressions were performed separately for boys and girls, controlling for birth health and family characteristics.Results: A negative relationship between mental-health problems and educational outcomes was found; this result was almost independent of the controls. Only minor differences between the sexes were detected.Conclusions: Poor mental-health during childhood correlated negatively with educational attainment. Given the strong link between educational success and adult life, more resources are needed to support children with mental-health problems.

Keywords
Mental-health, education, completion, grades, upper, secondary, school, Sweden
National Category
Psychiatry Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133133 (URN)10.1080/09638237.2017.1294739 (DOI)000407207800004 ()
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, K., Hammarström, A. & Strandh, M. (2017). The relationship between work and family preferences and behaviors: a longitudinal study of gender differences in Sweden. Acta Sociologica, 60(2), 120-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relationship between work and family preferences and behaviors: a longitudinal study of gender differences in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 120-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Proposed theories to explain gender inequality in the labor market and family, such as gender specialization within families and gender segregation in the labor markets, lack consideration for individual preferences. Preference theory accounts for individual choice and gendered preferences but has been substantially criticized, indicating a need for further research. This study uses Swedish longitudinal data to explore how preferences for work and family relate to behavior. We explore three critical issues raised in previous research: gender differences in preferences; the relationship between work and family changes and subsequent preferences; how preferences relate to work and family behaviors. Our results showed small general gender differences in preferences, although women had a stronger preference for both children and work than men. Changes in work status were further related to changes in work preferences, while changes in family status were related to changes in family preferences. Moreover, preferences had poor predictive power in relation to work and family behaviors. Our results indicate that preferences do not explain gender inequality in Sweden. The relationship between preferences and behaviors seems bidirectional and preferences and behavior within the family sphere has little to do with preferences and behavior within the work sphere.

Keywords
Gender, family, labor market, preferences, longitudinal, Sweden
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124668 (URN)10.1177/0001699316659322 (DOI)000400089400002 ()
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, U., Nilsson, K., de Luna, X. & Ivarsson, A. (2016). Data Resource Profile: Swedish Microdata Research from Childhood into Lifelong Health and Welfare (Umeå SIMSAM Lab). International Journal of Epidemiology, 45(4), 1075-1075g
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Data Resource Profile: Swedish Microdata Research from Childhood into Lifelong Health and Welfare (Umeå SIMSAM Lab)
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 1075-1075gArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120349 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyv358 (DOI)000393182000020 ()27170765 (PubMedID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-05-16 Created: 2016-05-16 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Strandh, M., Nilsson, K., Nordlund, M. & Hammarström, A. (2015). Do open youth unemployment and youth programs leave the same mental health scars?: Evidence from a Swedish 27-year cohort study. BMC Public Health, 15, Article ID 1151.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do open youth unemployment and youth programs leave the same mental health scars?: Evidence from a Swedish 27-year cohort study
2015 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, article id 1151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Recent findings suggest that the mental health costs of unemployment are related to both short- and long-term mental health scars. The main policy tools for dealing with young people at risk of labor market exclusion are Active Labor Market Policy programs for youths (youth programs). There has been little research on the potential effects of participation in youth programs on mental health and even less on whether participation in such programs alleviates the long-term mental health scarring caused by unemployment. This study compares exposure to open youth unemployment and exposure to youth program participation between ages 18 and 21 in relation to adult internalized mental health immediately after the end of the exposure period at age 21 and two decades later at age 43.

Methods: The study uses a five wave Swedish 27-year prospective cohort study consisting of all graduates from compulsory school in an industrial town in Sweden initiated in 1981. Of the original 1083 participants 94.3 % of those alive were still participating at the 27-year follow up. Exposure to open unemployment and youth programs were measured between ages 18–21. Mental health, indicated through an ordinal level three item composite index of internalized mental health symptoms (IMHS), was measured pre-exposure at age 16 and post exposure at ages 21 and 42.

Ordinal regressions of internalized mental health at ages 21 and 43 were performed using the Polytomous Universal Model (PLUM). Models were controlled for pre-exposure internalized mental health as well as other available confounders.

Results: Results show strong and significant relationships between exposure to open youth unemployment and IMHS at age 21 (OR = 2.48, CI = 1.57–3.60) as well as at age 43 (OR = 1.71, CI = 1.20–2.43). No such significant relationship is observed for exposure to youth programs at age 21 (OR = 0.95, CI = 0.72–1.26) or at age 43 (OR = 1.23, CI = 0.93–1.63).

Conclusions: A considered and consistent active labor market policy directed at youths could potentially reduce the short- and long-term mental health costs of youth unemployment.

Keywords
Youth unemployment, Youth programs, Mental health, Life course, Unemployment scarring
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113434 (URN)10.1186/s12889-015-2496-5 (DOI)000365310100003 ()26589399 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Kalucza, S., Hammarström, A. & Nilsson, K. (2015). Mental health and parenthood: a longitudinal study of the relationship between self-reported mental health and parenthood. Health Sociology Review, 24(3), 283-296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental health and parenthood: a longitudinal study of the relationship between self-reported mental health and parenthood
2015 (English)In: Health Sociology Review, ISSN 1446-1242, E-ISSN 1839-3551, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 283-296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

According to previous studies, the relationship between parenthood and mental health is not straightforward. One reason could be that selection effects on parenthood are seldom accounted for. Using the unique Northern Swedish Cohort dataset, following individuals from age 16 to 43 (n=1001), this study examines whether there is a selection effect of self-reported mental health in adolescence into parenthood; and whether entry into parenthood is related to subsequent mental health after controlling for prior mental health. Our results show no evidence of a selection effect for women, but men with poor mental health at age 16 were less likely to become fathers. Having children improved women's subsequent mental health after controlling for adolescent mental health, something that was not true for men. Our result reinforces the need for future research of the complex relationship between mental health and parenthood through focusing on, for example, timing of parenthood as well as through using different mental health measures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
family formation, mental health, health selection, longitudinal, sociology, Sweden
National Category
Sociology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111500 (URN)10.1080/14461242.2015.1051079 (DOI)000363309500005 ()
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Chaparro, M. P., Ivarsson, A., Koupil, I., Nilsson, K., Häggström, J., de Luna, X. & Lindgren, U. (2015). Regional inequalities in overweight and obesity among first-time pregnant women in Sweden, 1992–2010. In: 22nd European Congress on Obesity (ECO2015), Prague, Czech Republic, May 6-9, 2015: abstracts. Paper presented at 22nd European Congress on Obesity (ECO2015), Prague, Czech Republic, May 6-9, 2015 (pp. 119-119). S. Karger, 8: suppl 1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional inequalities in overweight and obesity among first-time pregnant women in Sweden, 1992–2010
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2015 (English)In: 22nd European Congress on Obesity (ECO2015), Prague, Czech Republic, May 6-9, 2015: abstracts, S. Karger, 2015, Vol. 8: suppl 1, p. 119-119Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2015
Series
Obesity facts, ISSN 1662-4025 ; 2015: suppl 1
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-103267 (URN)881251 (Local ID)978-3-318-05493-4 (ISBN)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Conference
22nd European Congress on Obesity (ECO2015), Prague, Czech Republic, May 6-9, 2015
Available from: 2015-05-19 Created: 2015-05-19 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
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