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Sandström, Camilla, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7674-6197
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Publications (10 of 141) Show all publications
Pekor, A., Jansson, I., Ole Seki, W., Rentsch, D., Spong, G. & Sandström, C. (2020). In search of new modes of governance: the potential of conservation incentive payment policies to promote human-wildlife co-existence. In: Fiona Nunan (Ed.), Governing renewable natural resources: theories and frameworks (pp. 204-225). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In search of new modes of governance: the potential of conservation incentive payment policies to promote human-wildlife co-existence
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2020 (English)In: Governing renewable natural resources: theories and frameworks / [ed] Fiona Nunan, Routledge, 2020, p. 204-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Over the past two decades, conservation incentive payments (CIPs), innovative incentive-based policy instruments, have gained appeal as a way to promote human–wildlife coexistence by linking the economic interests of local people with conservation goals. In theory, specific features of CIP programs enable them to improve outcomes for both people and wildlife. In practice, outcomes depend on the interplay between the three key constituent elements of governance: polity, politics, and policy. While many studies in natural resources governance focus on one or two of these elements, this chapter analyzes the nexus between the three elements and demonstrates that changes along the policy dimension, in particular, can help transform the others. To illustrate our argument, we use Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Conservation Area (NCA) as a case study. In the NCA, intense human–lion conflict over the past several decades has threatened the livelihoods of local people and led to a dramatic decline in the local lion population. We show how the introduction of a new policy instrument in the NCA—a CIP program—has the potential to promote human–lion coexistence while at the same time helping to shift the local mode of governance from top-down to participatory and interactive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2020
Series
Earthscan studies in natural resource management
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166143 (URN)10.4324/9780429053009 (DOI)978-0-367-14669-6 (ISBN)978-0-367-14670-2 (ISBN)978-0-429-05300-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Dressel, S., Johansson, M., Ericsson, G. & Sandström, C. (2020). Perceived adaptive capacity within a multi-level governance setting: The role of bonding, bridging, and linking social capital. Environmental Science and Policy, 104, 88-97
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived adaptive capacity within a multi-level governance setting: The role of bonding, bridging, and linking social capital
2020 (English)In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 104, p. 88-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2012 Sweden implemented a collaborative governance regime for managing moose (Alces alces). This was guided by the awareness that decentralization and stakeholder participation can help to reduce conflicts, foster systematic learning, and handle complexity. However, previous research has highlighted that there are no blueprint approaches to the governance and management of natural resources. In this case, diverse multi-use landscapes, ever-changing ungulate populations, and other external stressors (e.g. climate change, wildlife diseases) can create challenges for collaborative institutions. Adaptive capacity is therefore needed as it allows a system and the actors involved to react successfully to social-ecological changes and to develop even in times of no imminent change or risk. Using Swedish moose management as an example of a multi-level governance system, this research assesses the critical determinants of adaptive capacity across levels. We developed and applied a psychometric approach to measure actors’ perceived adaptive capacity on two levels in the management system. A web-based survey was sent to Moose Management Groups (n = 765, response rate = 81 %) and Moose Management Units (n = 1,380, response rate = 71 %). Using structural equation modelling, we assessed the relative importance of governance aspects, different types of social capital, as well as human and financial capital on actors’ perceived adaptive capacity. Linking and bridging social capital in the system had significant impacts on both levels. Actors felt more prepared to handle future challenges in moose management when they perceived benefits through collaborations with levels below and expressed social trust in authorities and the management level above. Besides those similarities between the two levels, fairness was a more important determinant of actors’ perceived adaptive capacity on the lower management level. These results can contribute to a future improvement of the collaborative governance setting by finessing strategic interventions on different levels. Furthermore, our results illustrate the importance of scale when assessing the adaptive capacity of a system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Adaptive capacity, Multi-level governance, Social capital, Social trust, Social-ecological system, Social learning
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166038 (URN)10.1016/j.envsci.2019.11.011 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 802-0161-15
Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved
Sandström, C., Kanyama, A. C., Räty, R., Sonnek, K. M., Nordström, E.-M., Mossing, A. & Nordin, A. (2020). Policy goals and instruments for achieving a desirable future forest: Experiences from backcasting with stakeholders in Sweden. Forest Policy and Economics, 111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Policy goals and instruments for achieving a desirable future forest: Experiences from backcasting with stakeholders in Sweden
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2020 (English)In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 111Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The future of forests is a controversial issue in Sweden and elsewhere. Different stakeholder groups differ in the importance they give to roles they envision forests should have in, for example, the national economy, the protection of biodiversity and sustainable use of ecosystem services, and in mitigating climate change. We used participatory backcasting, a solution-oriented form of scenario analysis, as a method to identify stakeholders' various views as to what constitutes a desirable future forest in Sweden. By involving key stakeholders, we wanted to explore how to broaden the scope of potential solutions to the controversial issue of forest futures by analyzing goals, measures and policy instruments in order to form a bridge between stakeholders' policy objectives, and the instruments and support tools they would like to use to implement those policies. Preferences for particular policy instruments varied considerably among the stakeholder groups. In line with the literature, our study confirms that policy instruments are not mere empty vessels, but represent particular policy ideas, objectives and outlooks, and can show how stakeholders want forests to be governed in the future.

Keywords
Governance, Participatory backcasting, Ecosystem services, Policy instruments, Scenarios
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165977 (URN)10.1016/j.forpol.2019.102051 (DOI)2-s2.0-85075215777 (Scopus ID)
Note

2019-12-06: Granskad /EJo

Available from: 2019-12-05 Created: 2019-12-05 Last updated: 2019-12-06
Bjärstig, T., Sandström, C., Sjögren, J., Sonesson, J. & Nordin, A. (2019). A struggling collaborative process: revisiting the woodland key habitat concept in Swedish forests. Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A struggling collaborative process: revisiting the woodland key habitat concept in Swedish forests
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The term woodland key habitat (WKH) was launched in Sweden in 1990. Definitions for the concept have changed over the years, and today the WKH concept and its application are issues of debate in Sweden. Consequently, the Swedish Forestry Agency (SFA) initiated a collaborative process including forest stakeholders with the purpose to clarify the application and develop the inventory methodology of WKH. We have studied, by means of interviews and observations, participant perceptions of how endogenous and exogenous factors affect the collaborative process. During our research, we identified three game changers: the pause in WKH registration in northwestern Sweden that caused several participants to drop out of the process; budget allocations for new nationwide WKH inventories that put the process on hold; and formal instructions from the government that came nine months later and essentially re-initiated the collaborative process. Altogether, this not only affected the participants’ abilities, understanding and willingness to participate, but also the overall legitimacy of the process – indicating the difficulty of conducting policy development in collaborative form, especially when it is highly politicized since it impact on the participants’ anticipation of the process and its end results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
evaluation, collaboration, woodland key habitat, inventories, forest, Sweden
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163501 (URN)10.1080/02827581.2019.1674916 (DOI)
Projects
Future Forests
Available from: 2019-10-01 Created: 2019-10-01 Last updated: 2019-10-09
Strand, G.-H., Hansen, I., de Boon, A. & Sandström, C. (2019). Carnivore Management Zones and their Impact on Sheep Farming in Norway. Environmental Management, 64(5), 537-552
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carnivore Management Zones and their Impact on Sheep Farming in Norway
2019 (English)In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 537-552Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated the impact of Norway's current zonal carnivore management system for four large carnivore species on sheep farming. Sheep losses increased when the large carnivores were reintroduced, but has declined again after the introduction of the zoning management system. The total number of sheep increased outside, but declined slightly inside the management zones. The total sheep production increased, but sheep farming was still lost as a source of income for many farmers. The use of the grazing resources became more extensive. Losses decreased because sheep were removed from the open outfield pastures and many farmers gave up sheep farming. While wolves expel sheep farming from the outfield grazing areas, small herds can still be kept in fenced enclosures. Bears are in every respect incompatible with sheep farming. Farmers adjust to the seasonal and more predictable behavior of lynx and wolverine, although these species also may cause serious losses when present. The mitigating efforts are costly and lead to reduced animal welfare and lower income for the farmers, although farmers in peri-urban areas increasingly are keeping sheep as an avocation. There is a spillover effect of the zoning strategy in the sense that there is substantial loss of livestock to carnivores outside, but geographically near the management zones. The carnivore management policy used in Norway is a reasonably successful management strategy when the goal is to separate livestock from carnivores and decrease the losses, but the burdens are unequally distributed and farmers inside the management zones are at an economic disadvantage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Carnivores, Livestock, Predation, Zoning, Pasture, Sheep
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164980 (URN)10.1007/s00267-019-01212-4 (DOI)000490832400001 ()31624855 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Simoncini, R., Ring, I., Sandström, C., Albert, C., Kasymov, U. & Arlettaz, R. (2019). Constraints and opportunities for mainstreaming biodiversity and ecosystem services in the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy: Insights from the IPBES assessment for Europe and Central Asia. Land use policy, 88, Article ID 104099.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constraints and opportunities for mainstreaming biodiversity and ecosystem services in the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy: Insights from the IPBES assessment for Europe and Central Asia
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2019 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 88, article id 104099Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The European Union’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), being one of the strongest drivers of agricultural land-use practices, has a substantial impact on biodiversity and ecosystem services in the Member States. The initial focus of the CAP to increase and intensify agricultural production affected water and land qualities and contributed to the degradation of traditional agricultural landscapes, cultural identities, and erosion of typical farmland biodiversity. Recent CAP reforms have begun to consider biodiversity and ecosystem services, but still fall short of a thorough mainstreaming approach. The objectives of this paper are to point out main findings regarding (i) key shortcomings of the current CAP, and (ii) major opportunities to enhance the mainstreaming of biodiversity and ecosystem services within the CAP. The paper is based on insights generated in the sub-global assessment of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) for Europe and Central Asia11A major part of this contribution is based on an earlier, pre-peer reviewed version of Ring et al. (2018): Ring, I., Sandström, C., Acar, S., Adeishvili, M., Albert, C., Allard, C., Anker, Y., Arlettaz, R., Bela, G., ten Brink, B., Fischer, A., Fürst, C., Galil, B., Hynes, S., Kasymov, U., Marta-Pedroso, C., Mendes, A., Molau, U., Olschewski, R., Pergl, J., & Simoncini, R. (2018): Chapter 6: Options for governance and decision-making across scales and sectors. In: IPBES (2018): The IPBES regional assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services for Europe and Central Asia. Rounsevell, M., Fischer, M., Torre-Marin Rando, A., Mader, A. (eds.). Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Bonn, Germany, pp. 661-802.. Our results illustrate the evolution of agricultural policy objectives and instruments applied in the CAP, and their effects on selected ecosystem services and biodiversity. We shed light on key shortcomings of existing policy and provide recommendations for further CAP reforms to achieve more effective biodiversity conservation and sustainable use of ecosystem services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Biodiversity, Ecosystem services, Common Agricultural Policy, Policy recommendations, Literature review
National Category
Environmental Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163935 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2019.104099 (DOI)000494886800015 ()
Available from: 2019-10-08 Created: 2019-10-08 Last updated: 2019-12-05Bibliographically approved
Neumann, W., Sandström, C., Holmgren, L. & Ericsson, G. (2019). Defining a mountain landscape characterized by grazing using actor perception, governmental strategy, and environmental monitoring data. Journal of Mountain Science, 16(7), 1691-1701
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Defining a mountain landscape characterized by grazing using actor perception, governmental strategy, and environmental monitoring data
2019 (English)In: Journal of Mountain Science, ISSN 1672-6316, E-ISSN 1993-0321, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 1691-1701Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In multi-functional mountainous landscapes worldwide, conservation of natural values is a major task. Here, pro-active policies can be a way forward. National Environmental Quality Objectives (EQO) to solve environmental problems for future generations, however, often wrestle with being too visionary and lacking specificity, which complicates their implementation. The EQO A Magnificent Mountain Landscape that has been adopted by the Swedish Parliament in 1999 to preserve the pristine mountain environment in Sweden, experiences all these flaws. To aid its implementation, we studied the conditions and processes needed to define, to evaluate, and to preserve its goals across the Swedish mountain chain, using one of its milestone targets (a landscape characterized by grazing) as a study system. Applying qualitative and quantitative methods, we analyzed three types of data: 1) referral responses to the governmental strategy document, 2) interviews with relevant actors, and 3) environmental monitoring data (reindeer position data). Nationally, our results suggest a need for geographical differentiation to match regional/local conditions. Regionally, difference in both perception and definition of the milestone target among the actors hinders the formulation, monitoring, and evaluation of a common goal. Next to a culture-nature divide, we found that a within as a user and from the outside as an observer perspective influenced suggested definitions. Moreover, we found a need for better defining whether the goal is maintaining current conditions or restoring previous ones. Our result supports the use of animal position data as a decision support tool to monitor and to aid evaluation of the target. Given the number of actors involved and conflicts of interests present, we suggest the application of a structured decision process to accomplish agreements on a common goal. Here, environmental monitoring data can aid a landscape assessment step as a natural part in the decision process to target landscape management actions resourcefully and effectively.

Keywords
Milestone target, Structured decision process, Reindeer herding, Herbivory, Environmental conservation strategy, Sweden
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161832 (URN)10.1007/s11629-018-5258-x (DOI)000474574600016 ()
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M., Dressel, S., Ericsson, G., Sjölander-Lindqvist, A. & Sandström, C. (2019). How stakeholder representatives cope with collaboration in the Swedish moose management system. Human Dimensions of Wildlife, 1-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How stakeholder representatives cope with collaboration in the Swedish moose management system
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2019 (English)In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, ISSN 1087-1209, E-ISSN 1533-158X, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The collaborative ecosystem-based management of moose (Alces alces) in Sweden puts a strain on the involved stakeholders. Representatives have to cope with environmental uncertainty and social stress associated with goal conflicts. This article advanced the understanding of representatives’ coping strategies in response to perceived challenges and how these coping strategies are associated with social trust, focusing upon salient value similarity. A mixed-method approach, combining a questionnaire survey (n = 624) and interviews (n = 21) among landowners and hunter representatives, was employed. Survey results showed that the presence of emotion-centered coping strategies that involve venting of negative emotions and behavioral disengagement were associated with relatively lower trust, whereas problem-solving centered coping was associated with relatively higher trust. The interviews indicated the importance of appointing group leaders who are skilled at initiating dialogue and working toward decisions and compromises, as this seemed to hinder expressions of emotion-centered coping strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Coping, social trust, moose, ecosystem-based management
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165976 (URN)10.1080/10871209.2019.1698081 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-12-05 Created: 2019-12-05 Last updated: 2019-12-06
Hansen, I., Strand, G.-H., de Boon, A. & Sandström, C. (2019). Impacts of Norwegian large carnivore management strategy on national grazing sector. Journal of Mountain Science, 16(11), 2470-2483
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impacts of Norwegian large carnivore management strategy on national grazing sector
2019 (English)In: Journal of Mountain Science, ISSN 1672-6316, E-ISSN 1993-0321, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 2470-2483Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing populations of large carnivores are leading to tension and conflicts with livestock production, a situation that potentially might escalate. In Norway the objective of the large carnivore policy is two-folded: to ensure viable carnivore populations and to secure a sustainable grazing industry. The main instrument is zonation, with carnivore management zones (CMZs) prioritized for reproduction of the large carnivore species separated from other areas prioritized for grazing livestock. The objective of this paper is to describe current knowledge about the impact of the zoning management strategy on the grazing industry. This is done by documenting status and changes in sheep production, losses of livestock to predating carnivores, and the use of grazing areas inside and outside the CMZs. CMZs offering protection for lynx, wolverine, bear and wolf cover 55% of the Norwegian mainland. 30% of the sheep and 50% of the Sami reindeer grazing areas are found inside the CMZs. Livestock (semi-domestic reindeer excluded) is using 59% of the available natural pasture areas outside the CMZs, but only 26% inside the CMZs. The lowest use of available grazing areas was found inside zones for wolves (12%) and brown bears (6%). Livestock in these zones are confined to fenced enclosures, mostly on the farm itself, or moved to pastures outside the management zone for summer grazing. Livestock losses increased in the affected regions during the period when carnivores were reestablished. Later, losses declined when CMZs were established and mitigation efforts were implemented in these zones. The bulk of sheep and reindeer killed by carnivores are now found in boundary areas within 50 km off the CMZs, where sheep are still grazing on open mountain and forest ranges. Therefore, instruments to protect livestock in areas close to the CMZs are also needed. The number of sheep declined inside the CMZs from 1999 to 2014, but increased outside the zones. The reduction in the absolute number of sheep in the CMZs is balanced by a similar increase outside, thus the total sheep production in Norway is maintained. We conclude that although of little consequence for the total food production in Norway, the economic and social impact of the large carnivore management strategy can be serious for local communities and individual farmers who are affected. There is a need for more exact carnivore population monitoring to quantify the carnivore pressure, better documentation of reindeer losses, and a clearer and stricter practicing of the zoning strategy. Increased involvement of social sciences is important in order to understand the human dimension of the carnivore conflicts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Science Press, 2019
Keywords
Carnivore management, Depredation, Management zones, Rangeland, Sheep, Large carnivore policy
National Category
Fish and Wildlife Management Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165249 (URN)10.1007/s11629-019-5419-6 (DOI)000495245200002 ()
Available from: 2019-11-17 Created: 2019-11-17 Last updated: 2019-11-26Bibliographically approved
Sjölander-Lindqvist, A. & Sandström, C. (2019). Shaking Hands: Balancing Tensions in the Swedish Forested Landscape. Conservation and Society, 17(4), 319-330
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shaking Hands: Balancing Tensions in the Swedish Forested Landscape
2019 (English)In: Conservation and Society, ISSN 0972-4923, E-ISSN 0975-3133, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 319-330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wild ungulates play a key role in the management and governance of Swedish wildlife. They are primarily harvested for meat, but are also important for non-consumptive uses of wildlife such as recreation. However, due to browsing and crop raiding, ungulates also reduce the forest's economic value and make it difficult for farmers to maintain agricultural practices. While current policies and regulations clearly indicate that wildlife is to be treated as a valuable, others may disagree. This setting provided an opportunity to study the search for mutually acceptable outcomes and working relationships in parallel to the state-regulated management arrangements. The shared and disputed issues in the studied case echo the broader issues of entitlement to resources and value transformation that can stabilise but also disturb or even disrupt environmental management. The diverging interests, claims and experiences of forestry, hunting, farming, recreation, and protection, expressed in their own voices and consolidated into narratives about land, land use, and rights and obligations, can be seen as an important driver of collective action. The connections between the experiences of and the dynamics behind the decision to collaborate reveal a contested space in which the commercial wood industries, agriculture, the decentralised state, conservation, and recreational interests are all involved and must negotiate with one-another to secure their interests. The participants justify their actions symbolically, referring to an idiom of rights, the construct of forestry's importance for the public good, and the desire to be resourceful and authoritative outside the framework of state action.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2019
Keywords
collaboration, wildlife, governance, cultural meaning, conflict, agreement
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies) Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167183 (URN)10.4103/cs.cs_18_112 (DOI)2-s2.0-85073708874 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Projects
Omstridda naturresurser - trender och utmaningar i nordisk naturvårds- och naturresursförvaltning, Camilla Sandström, Sissel Hovik, Eva Irene Falleth [2008-00223_VR]; Umeå UniversityForest land use and conflict management [2011-02343_VR]; Umeå UniversitySustainable rural development - for or by the people? [2011-117_Formas]; Umeå UniversityContested Spaces: Bridging Protection and Development in A Globalizing World [2016-06912_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7674-6197

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