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Marjavaara, Roger
Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Back, A. & Marjavaara, R. (2017). Mapping an invisible population: the uneven geography of second-home tourism. Tourism Geographies, 19(4), 596-611
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping an invisible population: the uneven geography of second-home tourism
2017 (English)In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 596-611Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Second-home tourism is a very popular form of tourism in many countries, particularly in the Nordic countries. More than half of the Swedish population have access to second homes. Previous studies have revealed that there is great variation between different second homes. Examples range from rustic Australian shacks, lonely cabins in the Norwegian mountains, spacious Swedish archipelago villas and palatial Russian dachas. Still, second homes are often seen and analysed as a unitary category – a perspective that obscures the considerable heterogeneity within the category as well as spatial differences in the impact of second-home tourism. Using a second-home typology from previous research and data on about 660,000 second homes, we analyse the heterogeneity of second homes by mapping the composition of the Swedish second-home stock. Results show the uneven geography of second-home tourism, revealing significant and sometimes steep differences between peripheral areas and urban hinterlands, tourism hot-spots, and areas in decline. Based on these results, we assert that there is good cause to move away from using second homes as a unitary category. Instead, we argue for viewing second homes as an umbrella concept with dwelling use in focus. This enables a greater sensibility to place and more accurate analyses of the uneven impacts of second-home tourism. The results also give greater insights into the impact of the ‘invisible population’ of second-home owners from a public planning perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
second homes, tourism, housing, planning, mobility, uneven development, peripheral regions, invisible population, Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135488 (URN)10.1080/14616688.2017.1331260 (DOI)000416590300004 ()2-s2.0-85019754532 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Marjavaara, R. & Lundholm, E. (2016). Does second-home ownership trigger migration in later life?. Population, Space and Place, 22(3), 228-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does second-home ownership trigger migration in later life?
2016 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 228-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As a result of the ongoing urbanization trend in many countries, most rural and peripheral areas are suffering from depopulation and out-migration. Nevertheless, some rural areas are experiencing a net in-flow of older migrants. One explanation mentioned is that people own second homes that are converted into permanent homes in later life. However, this description has rarely been tested empirically. Rather, it has been described as residual for migration into rural areas. Three hypotheses have been put forward in relation to second homes as a trigger for migration in later life. The first is that second-home owners are less inclined to move but utilize their second home more as a substitute for permanent amenity migration. The second is that owners are more likely to move as they have the opportunity to move permanently to their second home, while the third is that second-home owners would be more likely to downsize from their permanent home and make housing adjustments. This study attempts to answer the question if second-home ownership triggers migration in later life and if it is a matter of housing adjustment or converting a second home into a permanent home. This is performed by analysing microdata covering all individuals in Sweden in the 55–70-years age range in the 1999–2008 period. Results support the hypothesis that second-home ownership triggers migration in later life and, by so doing, imply that a life course perspective is valuable for our understanding of migration in later life and that not only permanent migration but also experiences of temporary mobility are relevant for migration biographies.

Keywords
retirement migration, second homes, rural population development, life course
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95098 (URN)10.1002/psp.1880 (DOI)000373801600002 ()
Note

Article first published online: 22 OCT 2014

Available from: 2014-10-22 Created: 2014-10-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Carson, D. A., Cleary, J., de la Barre, S., Eimermann, M. & Marjavaara, R. (2016). New Mobilities - New Economies?: Temporary populations and local innovation capacity in sparsely populated areas. In: Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus O. Rasmussen, Gertrude Saxinger (Ed.), Settlements at the Edge: Remote human settlements in developed nations (pp. 178-206). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Mobilities - New Economies?: Temporary populations and local innovation capacity in sparsely populated areas
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2016 (English)In: Settlements at the Edge: Remote human settlements in developed nations / [ed] Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus O. Rasmussen, Gertrude Saxinger, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 178-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Temporary population mobilities – including short-term labour, residential and recreational mobilities – have long been a prominent feature of human geography in sparsely populated areas. Such mobilities are often considered from a problem-centric perspective, with both academic and public discourses focusing extensively on the negative impacts that temporary populations have on local communities. Yet, temporary mobilities may also have a range of positive impacts, as they bring new people, ideas, skills, knowledge and network connections to remote communities, and thus potentially contribute to processes of local innovation. This chapter examines how different types of temporary populations contribute to local innovation capacity and new socio-economic development in remote communities. We propose a framework for analysing how different mobile populations with their particular temporal, spatial, motivational and interactional mobility characteristics impact on various forms of community capital, and subsequent innovation outcomes through the mobilisation of such capital. We then apply the framework to review five common examples of temporary mobilities in northern Scandinavia and Outback Australia, ranging from voluntary international lifestyle migrants to displaced refugee migrants, from seasonal second home-owners to short-term transit tourists, and from service to leisure-oriented Indigenous travellers. The review suggests that temporary populations offer substantial potential to boost innovation and new socio-economic development in remote communities, but that communities and institutional structures often fail to recognise and capitalise on such potential.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016
Keywords
temporary population mobilities; community capital; innovation capacity; lifestyle migrants; second home-owners; grey nomads; refugee migrants; Indigenous travellers
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126036 (URN)10.4337/9781784711962.00016 (DOI)9781784711955 (ISBN)9781784711962 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-09-27 Created: 2016-09-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Marjavaara, R. (2015). Second home tourism in Europe: lifestyle issues and policy responses [Review]. Journal of Tourism History, 7(1-2), 179-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Second home tourism in Europe: lifestyle issues and policy responses
2015 (English)In: Journal of Tourism History, ISSN 1755-182X, E-ISSN 1755-1838, Vol. 7, no 1-2, p. 179-181Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2015
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110611 (URN)10.1080/1755182X.2015.1059053 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-10-23 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Robertsson, L. & Marjavaara, R. (2015). The Seasonal Buzz: Knowledge Transfer in a Temporary Setting. Tourism Planning & Development, 12(3), 251-265
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Seasonal Buzz: Knowledge Transfer in a Temporary Setting
2015 (English)In: Tourism Planning & Development, ISSN 2156-8316, E-ISSN 2156-8324, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 251-265Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Much of the debate regarding how firms and places can stay competitive in a globalized economy is focused on innovative capabilities. Issues of knowledge creation, innovation and knowledge transfer within and between individuals and firms is a central field of research. Here, the local buzz is frequently mentioned as highly important for sustaining the innovation and knowledge-creation process among firms. Previous research has mainly focused on the effects of a local buzz situated at the place where the firm is located. In this article, we argue that there is a geographically displaced buzz that occurs on a temporary basis during leisure time, characterized by a heterogeneous composition of individuals. This can potentially boost the innovative capability of single firms and the destinations where it occurs. We term this the seasonal buzz. This paper discusses, empirically tests and analyses a possible seasonal buzz, based on a questionnaire survey targeting second-home owners at a ski resort in Sweden. Results support the assertion that there is a seasonal buzz, that new networks are created, and that the information exchanged is important for individuals in their professional life as well.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94065 (URN)10.1080/21568316.2014.947437 (DOI)000212855500001 ()
Projects
'From Resource Hinterland to Global Pleasure Periphery?’ within the Arctic Futures program
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Available from: 2014-10-03 Created: 2014-10-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Marjavaara, R. (2013). Den sista resan: de dödas mobilitet i Sverige. In: Andreas Sandberg (Ed.), Nyckeln till Svenska kyrkan: en skrift om organisation, verksamhet och ekonomi 2013 (pp. 19-31). Uppsala: Svenska Kyrkan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Den sista resan: de dödas mobilitet i Sverige
2013 (Swedish)In: Nyckeln till Svenska kyrkan: en skrift om organisation, verksamhet och ekonomi 2013 / [ed] Andreas Sandberg, Uppsala: Svenska Kyrkan , 2013, p. 19-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Svenska Kyrkan, 2013
Series
Nyckeln till Svenska kyrkan, ISSN 1651-0755
Keywords
Mobilitet, avlidna, begravningar, platsanknytning
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81421 (URN)
Projects
De dödas mobilitet: Nya perspektiv på platsanknytning
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2013-10-10 Created: 2013-10-10 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Marjavaara, R. (2013). Platsen för den sista vilan: Resultat av två enkätundersökningar rörande människors val av begravningsplats. Umeå: Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Platsen för den sista vilan: Resultat av två enkätundersökningar rörande människors val av begravningsplats
2013 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Umeå universitet, 2013. p. 48
Series
GERUM Kulturgeografisk arbetsrapport ; 2013-12-20
Keywords
begravningar, geografi, död, mobilitet, platsanknytning
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-84196 (URN)
Projects
De dödas mobilitet: Nya perspektiv på platsanknytning
Funder
Swedish Research Council, C0135101
Available from: 2013-12-17 Created: 2013-12-17 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lundmark, L. & Marjavaara, R. (2013). Second home ownership: a blessing for all?. Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, 13(4), 281-298
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Second home ownership: a blessing for all?
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 281-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Second home ownership is often regarded as being positive for the owners. Previous research shows that owning a second home means a great deal for the general satisfaction and quality of life of the owners. Historically, the political goal of expanding second home ownership among the Swedish population was to improve health and well-being and provide access to outdoor recreation and rural landscapes for the growing urban population, which is assumed to correlate with high satisfaction and quality of life among individuals. However, owning a second home does not always relate to positive experiences for owners, an issue not highlighted in previous second home research. Therefore, the purpose of the research presented here is to add to existing theories on second home ownership with special reference to the ambiguous relationships that exist between owners and their second homes. This is done by exploring and describing the group of second home owners who express negative experiences. The data used are retrieved from a nationwide questionnaire survey, targeting a representative sample of second home owners in Sweden during 2009. Results show that some 72,000 second home owners in Sweden can be defined as less satisfied and that age, health and income are important for ownership satisfaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2013
Keywords
second homes, satisfaction, life-stage, Sweden, ownership, acquisition
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-83688 (URN)10.1080/15022250.2013.862439 (DOI)000328016600002 ()
Available from: 2013-12-04 Created: 2013-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Marjavaara, R. (2013). Vad kan vi lära oss av de dödas mobilitet?. Geografiska Notiser, 71(2), 60-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vad kan vi lära oss av de dödas mobilitet?
2013 (Swedish)In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 60-64Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Keywords
Mobilitet, begravningar, döda
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-61611 (URN)
Projects
De dödas mobilitet: Nya perspektiv på platsanknytning
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2012-11-20 Created: 2012-11-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Müller, D. K. & Marjavaara, R. (2012). From second home to primary residence: migration towards recreational properties in Sweden 1991–2005. Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, 103(1), 53-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From second home to primary residence: migration towards recreational properties in Sweden 1991–2005
2012 (English)In: Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, ISSN 0040-747X, E-ISSN 1467-9663, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Second homes are at the nexus of tourism and migration. Previous research has demonstrated thatsecond homes are important domiciles after retirement. Nevertheless, few studies have addressedthis issue specifically. Many households claim that they would use their second homes more often,and some even state that they would convert these homes into their new permanent homes. Whilethis is a known phenomenon, its geographical outcome is rather unknown. Hence, the purpose ofthis paper is to investigate the conversion of second homes into primary residences. This is donewith respect to timing and geographical patterns. A geo-referenced longitudinal populationdatabase allows for identifying converted properties and linking them to information of theirowners’ households. This facilitates a discussion regarding the impact of conversions on planningand service provision in host communities, too. The analysis refers to the time period from 1991to 2005.

Keywords
Second homes, Sweden, GIS, retirement migration, tourism, life course
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-51262 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9663.2011.00674.x (DOI)000298986800004 ()
Available from: 2012-01-16 Created: 2012-01-16 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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