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Publications (10 of 76) Show all publications
Bergkvist, P. H., Jacobsson, L., Kling, S., Silviken, A., Sköld, P. & Stoor, J. P. (2016). Breaking the silence: suicide prevention through storytelling among indigenous Sami. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 75, 56-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breaking the silence: suicide prevention through storytelling among indigenous Sami
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 75, p. 56-56Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134313 (URN)10.3402/ijch.v75.33200 (DOI)000396153800158 ()
Available from: 2017-04-28 Created: 2017-04-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Porter, R., Yoshida Ahlin, C. & Sköld, P. (2016). Decline, Adaptation or Transformation: New Perspectives on Demographic Change in Resource Peripheries in Australia and Sweden. Comparative Population Studies, 41(3-4), 1-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decline, Adaptation or Transformation: New Perspectives on Demographic Change in Resource Peripheries in Australia and Sweden
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2016 (English)In: Comparative Population Studies, ISSN 1869-8980, E-ISSN 1869-8999, Vol. 41, no 3-4, p. 1-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many sparsely populated resource peripheries in developed countries are perceived to suffer from periods of demographic decline due to loss of employment opportunities and services, youth out-migration and population ageing. While these trends tend to apply at broad regional scales and for particular time periods, diverse patterns of demographic change may be apparent if different spatial, temporal and social scales of analysis are taken into consideration. Comparing the experiences of two case study regions in northern Sweden and inland South Australia, this paper proposes an alternative conceptual framework to the ‘discourse of decline’, which could be used to examine the nuances of demographic change within resource peripheries. The framework includes spatial scale considerations that contrast broader regional demographic patterns with the experiences of sub-regions and individual settlements. It also includes temporal scale aspects, examining demographic change over different time periods to understand the pace, duration and frequency of population growth and decline. The framework finally includes social unit considerations, emphasising that demographic change affects different social groups in different ways. The results of the case studies suggest that considering demographic change as adaptation or transformation rather than decline may be more useful for identifying new – and qualitatively different – demographic pathways that emerge over time. 

Keywords
demographic decline; resource peripheries; population ageing; youth out-migration; female flight
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131123 (URN)10.12765/CPoS-2016-11en (DOI)000394693600003 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-260
Available from: 2017-02-06 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Anderson, I., Robson, B., Connolly, M., Al-Yaman, F., Bjertness, E., King, A., . . . Yap, L. (2016). Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study. The Lancet, 388(10040), 131-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study
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2016 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, no 10040, p. 131-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark populations, but have been restricted in their coverage of countries or the range of health indicators. Our objective is to describe the health and social status of Indigenous and tribal peoples relative to benchmark populations from a sample of countries.

Methods: Collaborators with expertise in Indigenous health data systems were identified for each country. Data were obtained for population, life expectancy at birth, infant mortality, low and high birthweight, maternal mortality, nutritional status, educational attainment, and economic status. Data sources consisted of governmental data, data from non-governmental organisations such as UNICEF, and other research. Absolute and relative differences were calculated.

Findings: Our data (23 countries, 28 populations) provide evidence of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous peoples than for non-Indigenous populations. However, this is not uniformly the case, and the size of the rate difference varies. We document poorer outcomes for Indigenous populations for: life expectancy at birth for 16 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1 year in 15 populations; infant mortality rate for 18 of 19 populations with a rate difference greater than one per 1000 livebirths in 16 populations; maternal mortality in ten populations; low birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in three populations; high birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in one population; child malnutrition for ten of 16 populations with a difference greater than 10% in five populations; child obesity for eight of 12 populations with a difference greater than 5% in four populations; adult obesity for seven of 13 populations with a difference greater than 10% in four populations; educational attainment for 26 of 27 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 24 populations; and economic status for 15 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 14 populations.

Interpretation: We systematically collated data across a broader sample of countries and indicators than done in previous studies. Taking into account the UN Sustainable Development Goals, we recommend that national governments develop targeted policy responses to Indigenous health, improving access to health services, and Indigenous data within national surveillance systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Indigenous health, Population health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Ethnology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124249 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(16)00345-7 (DOI)000379269200030 ()27108232 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Wallenberg Academy FellowsSwedish Research Council, 2012-5490
Available from: 2016-08-02 Created: 2016-07-29 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Nordin, G. & Sköld, P. (2016). Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden. Energy Research & Social Science, 16, 13-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden
2016 (English)In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 16, p. 13-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent research has identified a series of human geography impacts of natural resource developments in sparsely populated areas like the Arctic. These impacts can be mapped to the 'resource cycle', and arise from periods of population growth and decline, changing patterns of human migration and mobility, changing patterns of settlement, and changes in the demographic 'balance' between males and females, young and old, Indigenous and non-Indigenous. This paper examines the applicability of the resource cycle model in the case of hydro energy development in the Jokkmokk municipality of Sweden. Using quantitative demographic data, media reports, and contemporary accounts of hydro development, the paper describes the human geography of Jokkmokk since the late 19th century. The paper concludes that changes in human geography in Jokkmokk mirror what has been observed in regions dependent on non-renewable resources, although it is difficult to distinguish many impacts from those that might have occurred under alternative development scenarios. The paper identifies a 'settlement cycle' with phases of integrated and separated habitation for populations specifically associated with the development. Settlement dynamics, and the impacts of hydro on Sami geography are areas for further research.

Keywords
hydropower, resource cycle, staples thesis, human geography, Arctic
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118369 (URN)10.1016/j.erss.2016.03.003 (DOI)000379436100003 ()
Projects
Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development (www.mistraarctic.se)
Note

Ett corrigendum har publicerats för den här artikeln: / A corrigendum for this article has been published:

Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Nordin, G., & Skold, P. (2017). Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden (vol 16, pg 13, 2016). Energy Research & Social Science, 28, 109-109. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2017.05.021

Available from: 2016-03-17 Created: 2016-03-17 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, P., Sköld, P. & Tano, S. (2016). Sweden: the Sami. In: Kate Silburn, Hannah Reich & Ian Anderson (Ed.), A global snapshot of indigenous and tribal peoples' health: the Lancet–Lowitja Institute collaboration (pp. 46-47). Carlton South, Victoria, Australia: The Lowitja Institute
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden: the Sami
2016 (English)In: A global snapshot of indigenous and tribal peoples' health: the Lancet–Lowitja Institute collaboration / [ed] Kate Silburn, Hannah Reich & Ian Anderson, Carlton South, Victoria, Australia: The Lowitja Institute , 2016, , p. 2p. 46-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Carlton South, Victoria, Australia: The Lowitja Institute, 2016. p. 2
Keywords
Indigenous health, Sami Health, Lowitja, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology; Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130354 (URN)978-1-921889-50-9 (ISBN)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-01-18 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Carson, D. B., Sköld, P., Carson, D. A. & Nilsson, L. M. (2016). The local demography of resource economies: long term implications of natural resource industries for demographic development in sparsely populated areas. In: Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Gertrude Saxinger (Ed.), Settlements at the edge: remote human settlements in developed nations (pp. 357-378). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The local demography of resource economies: long term implications of natural resource industries for demographic development in sparsely populated areas
2016 (English)In: Settlements at the edge: remote human settlements in developed nations / [ed] Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Gertrude Saxinger, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 357-378Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Settlements at the Edge examines the evolution, characteristics, functions and shifting economic basis of settlements in sparsely populated areas of developed nations. With a focus on demographic change, the book features theoretical and applied cases which explore the interface between demography, economy, well-being and the environment. This book offers a comprehensive and insightful knowledge base for understanding the role of population in shaping the development and histories of northern sparsely populated areas of developed nations including Alaska (USA), Australia, Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Finland and other nations with territories within the Arctic Circle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016
Series
New Horizons in Regional Science series
Keywords
natural resources, industries, mines, demography, settlement
National Category
Human Geography History
Research subject
Greek
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126012 (URN)9781784711955 (ISBN)9781784711962 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-09-26 Created: 2016-09-26 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sköld, P., Sandström, M. & Bolaane, M. (2015). Epilogue. In: Peter Sköld, Moa Sandström and Maiseo Bolaane (Ed.), Under the same sun: parallel issues and mutual challenges for San and Sami peoples and research (pp. 193-197). Umeå: Vaartoe/Centre for Sami Research (CeSam), Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epilogue
2015 (English)In: Under the same sun: parallel issues and mutual challenges for San and Sami peoples and research / [ed] Peter Sköld, Moa Sandström and Maiseo Bolaane, Umeå: Vaartoe/Centre for Sami Research (CeSam), Umeå University , 2015, p. 193-197Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Vaartoe/Centre for Sami Research (CeSam), Umeå University, 2015
Series
Skrifter från Centrum för samisk forskning, ISSN 1651-5455 ; 22
National Category
Ethnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114143 (URN)9789176011379 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-01-14 Created: 2016-01-14 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Sköld, P., Sandström, M. & Bolaane, M. (2015). Introduction. In: Peter Sköld, Moa Sandström and Maiseo Bolaane (Ed.), Under the same sun: parallel issues and mutual challenges for San and Sami peoples and research (pp. 1-16). Umeå: Vaartoe/Centre for Sami Research (CeSam), Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2015 (English)In: Under the same sun: parallel issues and mutual challenges for San and Sami peoples and research / [ed] Peter Sköld, Moa Sandström and Maiseo Bolaane, Umeå: Vaartoe/Centre for Sami Research (CeSam), Umeå University , 2015, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Vaartoe/Centre for Sami Research (CeSam), Umeå University, 2015
Series
Skrifter från Centrum för samisk forskning, ISSN 1651-5455 ; 22
National Category
Ethnology History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114142 (URN)9789176011379 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-01-14 Created: 2016-01-14 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Sköld, P. & Nordin, G. (2015). Metodologiska utmaningar vid studier av urfolk i en nordisk kontext. In: Paul Pedersen & Torill Nyseth (Ed.), City-Saami: Same i byen eller bysame? Skandinaviske byer i et samisk perspektiv (pp. 31-57). Kárášjohka: ČálliidLágádusas
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metodologiska utmaningar vid studier av urfolk i en nordisk kontext
2015 (Swedish)In: City-Saami: Same i byen eller bysame? Skandinaviske byer i et samisk perspektiv / [ed] Paul Pedersen & Torill Nyseth, Kárášjohka: ČálliidLágádusas , 2015, p. 31-57Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kárášjohka: ČálliidLágádusas, 2015
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117008 (URN)978-82-8263-181-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-02-17 Created: 2016-02-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Sköld, P. (2015). Perpetual adaption?: challanges for the Sami and reindeer husbandry in Sweden. In: Birgitta Evengård, Joan Nymand Larsen, Øyvind Paasche (Ed.), The new Arctic: (pp. 39-55). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perpetual adaption?: challanges for the Sami and reindeer husbandry in Sweden
2015 (English)In: The new Arctic / [ed] Birgitta Evengård, Joan Nymand Larsen, Øyvind Paasche, Cham: Springer, 2015, p. 39-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Reindeer husbandry is of vital importance for the Sami living in Sweden, Norway, Finland and Russia. With a focus on Sweden we can conclude that through a colonial history the reindeer herding Sami have achieved legal rights that to some extent guarantee their existence. This is largely due to a successful political mobilization. On the other hand conflicts over land use with non-Sami settlers and the Swedish state have been a frequent element in the industry. The Sami must also combat a stereotypical understanding of reindeer herding that often has difficulties in understanding the constant modernization and technical development. Today the reindeer herders compete with industries such as mines, hydropower, windmill parks, forestry and tourism. An additional threat is the predators and state policies around them. Reindeer herding is of vital importance to all Sami, but the legal system prohibits the large majority to be involved, something that has had recent political complications in the Sami society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2015
Keywords
Reindeer husbandry, Sami, Indigenous, Political mobilization, Indigenous culture
National Category
Ethnology Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114150 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-17602-4_4 (DOI)978-3-319-17601-7 (ISBN)978-3-319-17602-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-01-14 Created: 2016-01-14 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5762-949x

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