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Nilsson, Lena Maria
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Solans, M., Benavente, Y., Saez, M., Agudo, A., Naudin, S., Hosnijeh, F. S., . . . Casabonne, D. (2019). Adherence to the mediterranean diet and lymphoma risk in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition. International Journal of Cancer, 145(1), 122-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adherence to the mediterranean diet and lymphoma risk in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 145, no 1, p. 122-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a growing evidence of the protective role of the Mediterranean diet (MD) on cancer. However, no prospective study has yet investigated its influence on lymphoma. We evaluated the association between adherence to the MD and risk of lymphoma and its subtypes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The analysis included 476,160 participants, recruited from 10 European countries between 1991 and 2001. Adherence to the MD was estimated through the adapted relative MD (arMED) score excluding alcohol. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used while adjusting for potential confounders. During an average follow-up of 13.9 years, 3,136 lymphomas (135 Hodgkin lymphoma [HL], 2,606 non-HL and 395 lymphoma not otherwise specified) were identified. Overall, a 1-unit increase in the arMED score was associated with a 2% lower risk of lymphoma (95% CI: 0.97; 1.00, p-trend = 0.03) while a statistically nonsignificant inverse association between a high versus low arMED score and risk of lymphoma was observed (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.91 [95% CI 0.80; 1.03], p-trend = 0.12). Analyses by lymphoma subtype did not reveal any statistically significant associations. Albeit with small numbers of cases (N = 135), a suggestive inverse association was found for HL (HR 1-unit increase = 0.93 [95% CI: 0.86; 1.01], p-trend = 0.07). However, the study may have lacked statistical power to detect small effect sizes for lymphoma subtype. Our findings suggest that an increasing arMED score was inversely related to the risk of overall lymphoma in EPIC but not by subtypes. Further large prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
lymphoma, Mediterranean diet, Europe, prospective studies, risk
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159047 (URN)10.1002/ijc.32091 (DOI)000466175500012 ()30588620 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Sen, A., Papadimitriou, N., Lagiou, P., Perez-Cornago, A., Travis, R. C., Key, T. J., . . . Tsilidis, K. K. (2019). Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. International Journal of Cancer, 144(2), 240-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 2, p. 240-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The epidemiological evidence regarding the association of coffee and tea consumption with prostate cancer risk is inconclusive, and few cohort studies have assessed these associations by disease stage and grade. We examined the associations of coffee (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) and tea intake with prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Among 142,196 men, 7,036 incident prostate cancer cases were diagnosed over 14 years of follow-up. Data on coffee and tea consumption were collected through validated country-specific food questionnaires at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models were stratified by center and age, and adjusted for anthropometric, lifestyle and dietary factors. Median coffee and tea intake were 375 and 106 mL/day, respectively, but large variations existed by country. Comparing the highest (median of 855 mL/day) versus lowest (median of 103 mL/day) consumers of coffee and tea (450 vs. 12 mL/day) the HRs were 1.02 (95% CI, 0.94-1.09) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.90-1.07) for risk of total prostate cancer and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79-1.21) and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.70-1.13) for risk of fatal disease, respectively. No evidence of association was seen for consumption of total, caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee or tea and risk of total prostate cancer or cancer by stage, grade or fatality in this large cohort. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether an association exists by different preparations or by concentrations and constituents of these beverages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
coffee, tea, decaffeinated, caffeinated, prostate cancer, EPIC
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154799 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31634 (DOI)000452514500003 ()29943826 (PubMedID)
Funder
Region SkåneVästerbotten County CouncilSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-03-18Bibliographically approved
Key, T. J., Appleby, P. N., Bradbury, K. E., Sweeting, M., Wood, A., Johansson, I., . . . Danesh, J. (2019). Consumption of Meat, Fish, Dairy Products, Eggs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease: A Prospective Study of 7198 Incident Cases Among 409,885 Participants in the Pan-European EPIC Cohort. Circulation, 139(25), 2835-2845
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of Meat, Fish, Dairy Products, Eggs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease: A Prospective Study of 7198 Incident Cases Among 409,885 Participants in the Pan-European EPIC Cohort
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2019 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 139, no 25, p. 2835-2845Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty about the relevance of animal foods to the etiology of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined meat, fish, dairy products and eggs and risk for IHD in the pan-European EPIC cohort.

METHODS: A prospective study of 409,885 men and women in nine European countries. Diet was assessed using validated questionnaires, calibrated using 24-hour recalls. Lipids and blood pressure were measured in a subsample. During 12.6 years mean follow up, 7198 participants had a myocardial infarction or died from IHD. The relationships of animal foods with risk were examined using Cox regression with adjustment for other animal foods and relevant covariates.

RESULTS: The hazard ratio (HR) for IHD was 1.19 (95% CI 1.06-1.33) for a 100 g/d increment in intake of red and processed meat, and this remained significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up (HR 1.25 [1.09-1.42]). Risk was inversely associated with intakes of yogurt (HR 0.93 [0.89-0.98] per 100 g/d increment), cheese (HR 0.92 [0.86-0.98] per 30 g/d increment) and eggs (HR 0.93 [0.88-0.99] per 20 g/d increment); the associations with yogurt and eggs were attenuated and non-significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up. Risk was not significantly associated with intakes of poultry, fish or milk. In analyses modelling dietary substitutions, replacement of 100 kcal/d from red and processed meat with 100 kcal/d from fatty fish, yogurt, cheese or eggs was associated with approximately 20% lower risk of IHD. Consumption of red and processed meat was positively associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol concentration and systolic blood pressure, and consumption of cheese was inversely associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol.

CONCLUSIONS: Risk for IHD was positively associated with consumption of red and processed meat, and inversely associated with consumption of yogurt, cheese and eggs, although the associations with yogurt and eggs may be influenced by reverse causation bias. It is not clear whether the associations with red and processed meat and cheese reflect causality, but they were consistent with the associations of these foods with plasma non-HDL cholesterol, and for red and processed meat with systolic blood pressure, which could mediate such effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, eggs, fish, meat
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158691 (URN)10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.038813 (DOI)000471794100017 ()31006335 (PubMedID)
Funder
Wellcome trust, 205212/Z/16/ZSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilRegion SkåneVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-12-02Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Esberg, A., Nilsson, L. M., Jansson, J.-H., Wennberg, P. & Winkvist, A. (2019). Dairy Product Intake and Cardiometabolic Diseases in Northern Sweden: A 33-Year Prospective Cohort Study. Nutrients, 11(284)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dairy Product Intake and Cardiometabolic Diseases in Northern Sweden: A 33-Year Prospective Cohort Study
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dairy products are important constituents of most diets, and their association with adverse health outcomes remains a focus. We characterized dairy food intake and examined associations with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D), myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke among 108,065 Swedish men and women. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using the multivariable Cox proportional hazards models in a population characterized by high milk tolerance. During a mean follow-up of 14.2 years, 11,641 first-time events occurred. Non-fermented milk intake decreased, whereas butter intake increased over the period. For high intake of non-fermented milk, the HR (95% CI) for developing T2D and MI was 1.17 (1.03, 1.34) and 1.23 (1.10, 1.37), respectively, in men. A greater intake of butter, fermented milk, and cheese tended to be associated with a reduced risk of T2D and/or MI. Non-consumers and those who chose low-fat variants of the targeted dairy products had increased risk for T2D, MI, or stroke compared to those in the non-case group. Generally, effect-sizes were small. This prospective study found that non-fermented milk was associated with an increased risk for developing T2D and MI and that subjects abstaining from dairy products or choosing low-fat variants were at greater risk. However, the overall cardiometabolic risk of non-fermented milk intake was judged as low, since the effect sizes were small.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, milk, cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, type 2 diabetes
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156027 (URN)10.3390/nu11020284 (DOI)000460829700075 ()30696081 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060813708 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L. M., Winkvist, A., Esberg, A., Jansson, J.-H., Wennberg, P., van Guelpen, B. & Johansson, I. (2019). Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population. Nutrition and Cancer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population
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2019 (English)In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The role of dairy products in cancer is unclear. We assessed consumption of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter, estimated from semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires, in relation to prospective risk of breast, prostate, colorectal, smoking-, and obesity-related cancers in 101,235 subjects, including 12,552 cancer cases, in the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Most analyses (n = 20) rendered null results. In men, we observed an increased prostate cancer risk among high-consumers of cheese (hazard ratio (HR) for highest vs. lowest quintile (Q5-Q1), 1.11; 95% CI, 0.97-1.27; Ptrend = 0.013). In women, high-consumers of cheese had a decreased risk of overall cancer (HR Q5-Q1, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.88-1.04; Ptrend = 0.039), smoking-related (HR Q5-Q1, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97; Ptrend ≤ 0.001), and colorectal cancers (HR Q5-Q1, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.63-1.07; Ptrend = 0.048). Butter yielded a weak decreased obesity-related cancer risk in women (HR Q5-Q1, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.81-1.02; Ptrend = 0.049). Fermented milk yielded HRs below zero in women, but with no clear linear associations. In conclusion, this study does not support any major adverse or beneficial effects of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter in the diet from a cancer risk perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, milk, cheese, fermented milk, cancer
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161682 (URN)10.1080/01635581.2019.1637441 (DOI)000476072800001 ()31298944 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068900342 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-25 Created: 2019-07-25 Last updated: 2019-08-12
Solans, M., Benavente, Y., Saez, M., Agudo, A., Jakszyn, P., Naudin, S., . . . Casabonne, D. (2019). Inflammatory potential of diet and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.. European Journal of Nutrition
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory potential of diet and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in lymphomagenesis and several dietary factors seem to be involved its regulation. The aim of the current study was to assess the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and the risk of lymphoma and its subtypes in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

Methods: The analysis included 476,160 subjects with an average follow-up of 13.9 years, during which 3,136 lymphomas (135 Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), 2606 non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and 395 NOS) were identified. The dietary inflammatory potential was assessed by means of an inflammatory score of the diet (ISD), calculated using 28 dietary components and their corresponding inflammatory weights. The association between the ISD and lymphoma risk was estimated by hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) calculated by multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounders.

Results: The ISD was not associated with overall lymphoma risk. Among lymphoma subtypes, a positive association between the ISD and mature B-cell NHL (HR for a 1-SD increase: 1.07 (95% CI 1.01; 1.14), p trend = 0.03) was observed. No statistically significant association was found among other subtypes. However, albeit with smaller number of cases, a suggestive association was observed for HL (HR for a 1-SD increase = 1.22 (95% CI 0.94; 1.57), p trend 0.13).

Conclusions: Our findings suggested that a high ISD score, reflecting a pro-inflammatory diet, was modestly positively associated with the risk of B-cell lymphoma subtypes. Further large prospective studies on low-grade inflammation induced by diet are warranted to confirm these findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2019
Keywords
Chronic inflammation, Inflammatory score of the diet, Lymphoma, Nutrition, Prospective studies
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157844 (URN)10.1007/s00394-019-01947-0 (DOI)30903361 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-04-05
Bodén, S., Myte, R., Wennberg, M., Harlid, S., Johansson, I., Shivappa, N., . . . Nilsson, L. M. (2019). The inflammatory potential of diet in determining cancer risk: a prospective investigation of two dietary pattern scores. PLoS ONE, 14(4), Article ID e0214551.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The inflammatory potential of diet in determining cancer risk: a prospective investigation of two dietary pattern scores
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214551Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Inflammation-related mechanisms may contribute to the link between diet and cancer. We sought to investigate the inflammatory impact of diet on cancer risk using the Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and an adapted Mediterranean diet score (MDS).

METHODS: This population-based, prospective cohort study used self-reported dietary data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, including 100,881 participants, of whom 35,393 had repeated measures. Associations between dietary patterns and cancer risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. We also used restricted cubic splines to test for potential non-linear associations.

RESULTS: A total of 9,250 incident cancer cases were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 15 years. The two dietary patterns were moderately correlated to each other and had similar associations with cancer risk, predominantly lung cancer in men (DII per tertile decrease: Hazard ratio (HR) 0.81 (0.66-0.99), MDS per tertile increase: HR 0.86 (0.72-1.03)), and gastric cancer in men (DII: 0.73 (0.53-0.99), MDS: 0.73 (0.56-0.96)). Associations were, in general, found to be linear. We found no longitudinal association between 10-year change in diet and cancer risk.

CONCLUSION: We confirm small, but consistent and statistically significant associations between a more anti-inflammatory or healthier diet and reduced risk of cancer, including a lower risk of lung and gastric cancer in men. The dietary indexes produced similar associations with respect to the risk of cancer.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158790 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0214551 (DOI)000464349000016 ()30978193 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Dossus, L., Franceschi, S., Biessy, C., Navionis, A.-S., Travis, R. C., Weiderpass, E., . . . Rinaldi, S. (2018). Adipokines and inflammation markers and risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: The EPIC study. International Journal of Cancer, 142(7), 1332-1342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adipokines and inflammation markers and risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: The EPIC study
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 7, p. 1332-1342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Other than the influence of ionizing radiation and benign thyroid disease, little is known about the risk factors for differentiated thyroid cancer (TC) which is an increasing common cancer worldwide. Consistent evidence shows that body mass is positively associated with TC risk. As excess weight is a state of chronic inflammation, we investigated the relationship between concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the risk of TC. A case-control study was nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study and included 475 first primary incident TC cases (399 women and 76 men) and 1,016 matched cancer-free cohort participants. Biomarkers were measured in serum samples using validated and highly sensitive commercially available immunoassays. Odds ratios (ORs) of TC by levels of each biomarker were estimated using conditional logistic regression models, adjusting for BMI and alcohol consumption. Adiponectin was inversely associated with TC risk among women (ORT3vs.T1  = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.49-0.98, Ptrend  = 0.04) but not among men (ORT3vs.T1  = 1.36, 95% CI: 0.67-2.76, Ptrend  = 0.37). Increasing levels of IL-10 were positively associated with TC risk in both genders and significantly so in women (ORT3vs.T1  = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.13-2.25, Ptrend  = 0.01) but not in men (ORT3vs.T1  = 1.78, 95% CI: 0.80-3.98, Ptrend  = 0.17). Leptin, CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α were not associated with TC risk in either gender. These results indicate a positive association of TC risk with IL-10 and a negative association with adiponectin that is probably restricted to women. Inflammation may play a role in TC in combination with or independently of excess weight.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
adipokine, cytokine, inflammation, prospective cohort, thyroid cancer
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144783 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31172 (DOI)000424635000006 ()29168186 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Perez-Cornago, A., Appleby, P. N., Boeing, H., Gil, L., Kyrø, C., Ricceri, F., . . . Travis, R. C. (2018). Circulating isoflavone and lignan concentrations and prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis of individual participant data from seven prospective studies including 2828 cases and 5593 controls. International Journal of Cancer, 143(11), 2677-2686
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating isoflavone and lignan concentrations and prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis of individual participant data from seven prospective studies including 2828 cases and 5593 controls
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 11, p. 2677-2686Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytoestrogens may influence prostate cancer development. This study aimed to examine the association between pre-diagnostic circulating concentrations of isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, equol) and lignans (enterolactone and enterodiol) and the risk of prostate cancer. Individual participant data were available from seven prospective studies (two studies from Japan with 241 cases and 503 controls and five studies from Europe with 2,828 cases and 5,593 controls). Because of the large difference in circulating isoflavone concentrations between Japan and Europe, analyses of the associations of isoflavone concentrations and prostate cancer risk were evaluated separately. Prostate cancer risk by study-specific fourths of circulating concentrations of each phytoestrogen was estimated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression. In men from Japan, those with high compared to low circulating equol concentrations had a lower risk of prostate cancer (multivariable-adjusted OR for upper quartile [Q4] vs Q1=0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.39-0.97), although there was no significant trend (OR per 75 percentile increase=0.69, 95 CI=0.46-1.05, Ptrend =0.085); Genistein and daidzein concentrations were not significantly associated with risk (ORs for Q4 vs Q1=0.70, 0.45-1.10, and 0.71, 0.45-1.12, respectively). In men from Europe, circulating concentrations of genistein, daidzein and equol were not associated with risk. Circulating lignan concentrations were not associated with the risk of prostate cancer, overall or by disease aggressiveness or time to diagnosis. There was no strong evidence that pre-diagnostic circulating concentrations of isoflavones or lignans are associated with prostate cancer risk, although further research is warranted in populations where isoflavone intakes are high.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
isoflavones, lignans, phytoestrogens, pooled analysis, prostate cancer risk
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150143 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31640 (DOI)000450846900006 ()29971774 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054090054 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Landais, E., Moskal, A., Mullee, A., Nicolas, G., Gunter, M. J., Huybrechts, I., . . . Freisling, H. (2018). Coffee and Tea Consumption and the Contribution of Their Added Ingredients to Total Energy and Nutrient Intakes in 10 European Countries: Benchmark Data from the Late 1990s. Nutrients, 10(6), Article ID 725.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coffee and Tea Consumption and the Contribution of Their Added Ingredients to Total Energy and Nutrient Intakes in 10 European Countries: Benchmark Data from the Late 1990s
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2018 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 6, article id 725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Coffee and tea are among the most commonly consumed nonalcoholic beverages worldwide, but methodological differences in assessing intake often hamper comparisons across populations. We aimed to (i) describe coffee and tea intakes and (ii) assess their contribution to intakes of selected nutrients in adults across 10 European countries.

Method: Between 1995 and 2000, a standardized 24-h dietary recall was conducted among 36,018 men and women from 27 European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study centres. Adjusted arithmetic means of intakes were estimated in grams (=volume) per day by sex and centre. Means of intake across centres were compared by sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle factors.

Results: In women, the mean daily intake of coffee ranged from 94 g/day (similar to 0.6 cups) in Greece to 781 g/day (similar to 4.4 cups) in Aarhus (Denmark), and tea from 14 g/day (similar to 0.1 cups) in Navarra (Spain) to 788 g/day (similar to 4.3 cups) in the UK general population. Similar geographical patterns for mean daily intakes of both coffee and tea were observed in men. Current smokers as compared with those who reported never smoking tended to drink on average up to 500 g/day more coffee and tea combined, but with substantial variation across centres. Other individuals' characteristics such as educational attainment or age were less predictive. In all centres, coffee and tea contributed to less than 10% of the energy intake. The greatest contribution to total sugar intakes was observed in Southern European centres (up to similar to 20%).

Conclusion: Coffee and tea intake and their contribution to energy and sugar intake differed greatly among European adults. Variation in consumption was mostly driven by geographical region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
coffee, tea, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, 24-h dietary recall
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150865 (URN)10.3390/nu10060725 (DOI)000436507200069 ()29874819 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048270596 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2019-06-05Bibliographically approved
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