umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Nilsson, Lena Maria
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 84) Show all publications
Sen, A., Papadimitriou, N., Lagiou, P., Perez-Cornago, A., Travis, R. C., Key, T. J., . . . Tsilidis, K. K. (2019). Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. International Journal of Cancer, 144(2), 240-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Show others...
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 2, p. 240-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The epidemiological evidence regarding the association of coffee and tea consumption with prostate cancer risk is inconclusive, and few cohort studies have assessed these associations by disease stage and grade. We examined the associations of coffee (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) and tea intake with prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Among 142,196 men, 7,036 incident prostate cancer cases were diagnosed over 14 years of follow-up. Data on coffee and tea consumption were collected through validated country-specific food questionnaires at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models were stratified by center and age, and adjusted for anthropometric, lifestyle and dietary factors. Median coffee and tea intake were 375 and 106 mL/day, respectively, but large variations existed by country. Comparing the highest (median of 855 mL/day) versus lowest (median of 103 mL/day) consumers of coffee and tea (450 vs. 12 mL/day) the HRs were 1.02 (95% CI, 0.94-1.09) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.90-1.07) for risk of total prostate cancer and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79-1.21) and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.70-1.13) for risk of fatal disease, respectively. No evidence of association was seen for consumption of total, caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee or tea and risk of total prostate cancer or cancer by stage, grade or fatality in this large cohort. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether an association exists by different preparations or by concentrations and constituents of these beverages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
coffee, tea, decaffeinated, caffeinated, prostate cancer, EPIC
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154799 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31634 (DOI)000452514500003 ()29943826 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Dossus, L., Franceschi, S., Biessy, C., Navionis, A.-S., Travis, R. C., Weiderpass, E., . . . Rinaldi, S. (2018). Adipokines and inflammation markers and risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: The EPIC study. International Journal of Cancer, 142(7), 1332-1342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adipokines and inflammation markers and risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: The EPIC study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 7, p. 1332-1342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Other than the influence of ionizing radiation and benign thyroid disease, little is known about the risk factors for differentiated thyroid cancer (TC) which is an increasing common cancer worldwide. Consistent evidence shows that body mass is positively associated with TC risk. As excess weight is a state of chronic inflammation, we investigated the relationship between concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the risk of TC. A case-control study was nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study and included 475 first primary incident TC cases (399 women and 76 men) and 1,016 matched cancer-free cohort participants. Biomarkers were measured in serum samples using validated and highly sensitive commercially available immunoassays. Odds ratios (ORs) of TC by levels of each biomarker were estimated using conditional logistic regression models, adjusting for BMI and alcohol consumption. Adiponectin was inversely associated with TC risk among women (ORT3vs.T1  = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.49-0.98, Ptrend  = 0.04) but not among men (ORT3vs.T1  = 1.36, 95% CI: 0.67-2.76, Ptrend  = 0.37). Increasing levels of IL-10 were positively associated with TC risk in both genders and significantly so in women (ORT3vs.T1  = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.13-2.25, Ptrend  = 0.01) but not in men (ORT3vs.T1  = 1.78, 95% CI: 0.80-3.98, Ptrend  = 0.17). Leptin, CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α were not associated with TC risk in either gender. These results indicate a positive association of TC risk with IL-10 and a negative association with adiponectin that is probably restricted to women. Inflammation may play a role in TC in combination with or independently of excess weight.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
adipokine, cytokine, inflammation, prospective cohort, thyroid cancer
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144783 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31172 (DOI)000424635000006 ()29168186 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Perez-Cornago, A., Appleby, P. N., Boeing, H., Gil, L., Kyrø, C., Ricceri, F., . . . Travis, R. C. (2018). Circulating isoflavone and lignan concentrations and prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis of individual participant data from seven prospective studies including 2828 cases and 5593 controls. International Journal of Cancer, 143(11), 2677-2686
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating isoflavone and lignan concentrations and prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis of individual participant data from seven prospective studies including 2828 cases and 5593 controls
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 11, p. 2677-2686Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytoestrogens may influence prostate cancer development. This study aimed to examine the association between pre-diagnostic circulating concentrations of isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, equol) and lignans (enterolactone and enterodiol) and the risk of prostate cancer. Individual participant data were available from seven prospective studies (two studies from Japan with 241 cases and 503 controls and five studies from Europe with 2,828 cases and 5,593 controls). Because of the large difference in circulating isoflavone concentrations between Japan and Europe, analyses of the associations of isoflavone concentrations and prostate cancer risk were evaluated separately. Prostate cancer risk by study-specific fourths of circulating concentrations of each phytoestrogen was estimated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression. In men from Japan, those with high compared to low circulating equol concentrations had a lower risk of prostate cancer (multivariable-adjusted OR for upper quartile [Q4] vs Q1=0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.39-0.97), although there was no significant trend (OR per 75 percentile increase=0.69, 95 CI=0.46-1.05, Ptrend =0.085); Genistein and daidzein concentrations were not significantly associated with risk (ORs for Q4 vs Q1=0.70, 0.45-1.10, and 0.71, 0.45-1.12, respectively). In men from Europe, circulating concentrations of genistein, daidzein and equol were not associated with risk. Circulating lignan concentrations were not associated with the risk of prostate cancer, overall or by disease aggressiveness or time to diagnosis. There was no strong evidence that pre-diagnostic circulating concentrations of isoflavones or lignans are associated with prostate cancer risk, although further research is warranted in populations where isoflavone intakes are high.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
isoflavones, lignans, phytoestrogens, pooled analysis, prostate cancer risk
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150143 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31640 (DOI)000450846900006 ()29971774 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054090054 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Landais, E., Moskal, A., Mullee, A., Nicolas, G., Gunter, M. J., Huybrechts, I., . . . Freisling, H. (2018). Coffee and Tea Consumption and the Contribution of Their Added Ingredients to Total Energy and Nutrient Intakes in 10 European Countries: Benchmark Data from the Late 1990s. Nutrients, 10(6), Article ID 725.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coffee and Tea Consumption and the Contribution of Their Added Ingredients to Total Energy and Nutrient Intakes in 10 European Countries: Benchmark Data from the Late 1990s
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 6, article id 725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Coffee and tea are among the most commonly consumed nonalcoholic beverages worldwide, but methodological differences in assessing intake often hamper comparisons across populations. We aimed to (i) describe coffee and tea intakes and (ii) assess their contribution to intakes of selected nutrients in adults across 10 European countries.

Method: Between 1995 and 2000, a standardized 24-h dietary recall was conducted among 36,018 men and women from 27 European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study centres. Adjusted arithmetic means of intakes were estimated in grams (=volume) per day by sex and centre. Means of intake across centres were compared by sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle factors.

Results: In women, the mean daily intake of coffee ranged from 94 g/day (similar to 0.6 cups) in Greece to 781 g/day (similar to 4.4 cups) in Aarhus (Denmark), and tea from 14 g/day (similar to 0.1 cups) in Navarra (Spain) to 788 g/day (similar to 4.3 cups) in the UK general population. Similar geographical patterns for mean daily intakes of both coffee and tea were observed in men. Current smokers as compared with those who reported never smoking tended to drink on average up to 500 g/day more coffee and tea combined, but with substantial variation across centres. Other individuals' characteristics such as educational attainment or age were less predictive. In all centres, coffee and tea contributed to less than 10% of the energy intake. The greatest contribution to total sugar intakes was observed in Southern European centres (up to similar to 20%).

Conclusion: Coffee and tea intake and their contribution to energy and sugar intake differed greatly among European adults. Variation in consumption was mostly driven by geographical region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
coffee, tea, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, 24-h dietary recall
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150865 (URN)10.3390/nu10060725 (DOI)000436507200069 ()29874819 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048270596 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Lukic, M., Nilsson, L. M., Skeie, G., Lindahl, B. & Braaten, T. (2018). Coffee consumption and risk of rare cancers in Scandinavian countries. European Journal of Epidemiology, 33(3), 287-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coffee consumption and risk of rare cancers in Scandinavian countries
Show others...
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 287-302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies on the association between heavy coffee consumption and risk of less frequently diagnosed cancers are scarce. We aimed to quantify the association between filtered, boiled, and total coffee consumption and the risk of bladder, esophageal, kidney, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. We used data from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Information on coffee consumption was available for 193,439 participants. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the investigated cancer sites by category of total, filtered, and boiled coffee consumption. Heavy filtered coffee consumers (C 4 cups/day) had a multivariable adjusted HR of 0.74 of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (95% CI 0.57-0.95) when compared with light filtered coffee consumers (<= 1 cup/day). We did not observe significant associations between total or boiled coffee consumption and any of the investigated cancer sites, neither in the entire study sample nor in analyses stratified by sex. We found an increased risk of bladder cancer among never smokers who were heavy filtered or total coffee consumers, and an increased risk of stomach cancer in never smokers who were heavy boiled coffee consumers. Our data suggest that increased filtered coffee consumption might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find evidence of an association between coffee consumption and the risk of esophageal or kidney cancer. The increased risk of bladder and stomach cancer was confined to never smokers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Coffee, Filtered, Boiled, Cancer, Bladder, Esophageal, Kidney, Pancreatic, Stomach, Prospective cohort study
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147357 (URN)10.1007/s10654-018-0369-9 (DOI)000429475100005 ()29476356 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-07 Created: 2018-05-07 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Nilsson, L. M., Esberg, A., Jansson, J.-H. & Winkvist, A. (2018). Dairy intake revisited - associations between dairy intake and lifestyle related cardio-metabolic risk factors in a high milk consuming population. Nutrition Journal, 17, Article ID 110.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dairy intake revisited - associations between dairy intake and lifestyle related cardio-metabolic risk factors in a high milk consuming population
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 17, article id 110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The association between milk and dairy intake and the incidence of cardiometabolic diseases, cancer and mortality has been evaluated in many studies, but these studies have had conflicting results with no clear conclusion on causal or confounding associations. The present study aims to further address this association by cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluation of the associations between exposure to various types of dairy products and metabolic risk markers among inhabitants in northern Sweden while taking other lifestyle factors into account.

Methods: Respondents in the Vasterbotten Intervention Programme with complete and plausible diet data between 1991 and 2016 were included, yielding 124,934 observations from 90,512 unique subjects. For longitudinal analysis, 27,682 participants with a visit 8-12years after the first visit were identified. All participants completed a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Metabolic risk markers, including body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, serum (S) cholesterol and triglycerides, and blood glucose, were measured. Participants were categorized into quintiles by intake of dairy products, and risk (odds ratios, OR) of undesirable levels of metabolic risk markers was assessed in multivariable logistic regression analyses. In longitudinal analyses, intake quintiles were related to desirable levels of metabolic risk markers at both visits or deterioration at follow-up using Cox regression analyses.

Results: The OR of being classified with an undesirable BMI decreased with increasing quintiles of total dairy, cheese and butter intake but increased with increasing non-fermented milk intake. The OR of being classified with an undesirable S-cholesterol level increased with increasing intake of total dairy, butter and high fat (3%) non-fermented milk, whereas an undesirable S-triglyceride level was inversely associated with cheese and butter intake in women. In longitudinal analyses, increasing butter intake was associated with deterioration of S-cholesterol and blood glucose levels, whereas increasing cheese intake was associated with a lower risk of deterioration of S-triglycerides.

Conclusions: Confounding factors likely contribute to the demonstrated association between dairy intake and mortality, and other medical conditions and analyses should be stratified by dairy type.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Dairy products, Milk, Cheese, Butter, Fermented milk, Non-fermented milk, BMI, Serum lipids, Blood glucose, Blood pressure
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154046 (URN)10.1186/s12937-018-0418-y (DOI)000451026300003 ()30466440 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Zamora-Ros, R., Cayssials, V., Jenab, M., Rothwell, J. A., Fedirko, V., Aleksandrova, K., . . . Scalbert, A. (2018). Dietary intake of total polyphenol and polyphenol classes and the risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. European Journal of Epidemiology, 33(11), 1063-1075
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary intake of total polyphenol and polyphenol classes and the risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort
Show others...
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 1063-1075Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Polyphenols may play a chemopreventive role in colorectal cancer (CRC); however, epidemiological evidence supporting a role for intake of individual polyphenol classes, other than flavonoids is insufficient. We evaluated the association between dietary intakes of total and individual classes and subclasses of polyphenols and CRC risk and its main subsites, colon and rectum, within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The cohort included 476,160 men and women from 10 European countries. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, there were 5991 incident CRC cases, of which 3897 were in the colon and 2094 were in the rectum. Polyphenol intake was estimated using validated centre/country specific dietary questionnaires and the Phenol-Explorer database. In multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models, a doubling in total dietary polyphenol intake was not associated with CRC risk in women (HRlog2 = 1.06, 95% CI 0.99–1.14) or in men (HRlog2 = 0.97, 95% CI 0.90–1.05), respectively. Phenolic acid intake, highly correlated with coffee consumption, was inversely associated with colon cancer in men (HRlog2 = 0.91, 95% CI 0.85–0.97) and positively associated with rectal cancer in women (HRlog2 = 1.10, 95% CI 1.02–1.19); although associations did not exceed the Bonferroni threshold for significance. Intake of other polyphenol classes was not related to colorectal, colon or rectal cancer risks. Our study suggests a possible inverse association between phenolic acid intake and colon cancer risk in men and positive with rectal cancer risk in women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2018
Keywords
Polyphenols, Intake, Diet, Colorectal cancer, Prospective cohort, EPIC
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153120 (URN)10.1007/s10654-018-0408-6 (DOI)000447899500005 ()29761424 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-12 Created: 2018-11-12 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Ordóñez-Me, J. M., Walter, V., Schöttker, B., Jenab, M., O'Doherty, M. G., Kee, F., . . . Brenner, H. (2018). Impact of prediagnostic smoking and smoking cessation on colorectal cancer prognosis: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from cohorts within the CHANCES consortium. Annals of Oncology, 29(2), 472-483
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of prediagnostic smoking and smoking cessation on colorectal cancer prognosis: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from cohorts within the CHANCES consortium
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 472-483Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Smoking has been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality in previous studies and might also be associated with prognosis after CRC diagnosis. However, current evidence on smoking in association with CRC prognosis is limited.

Patients and methods: For this individual patient data meta-analysis, sociodemographic and smoking behavior information of 12,414 incident CRC patients (median age at diagnosis: 64.3 years), recruited within 14 prospective cohort studies among previously cancer-free adults, was collected at baseline and harmonized across studies. Vital status and causes of death were collected for a mean follow-up time of 5.1 years following cancer diagnosis. Associations of smoking behavior with overall and CRC-specific survival were evaluated using Cox regression and standard meta-analysis methodology.

Results: A total of 5,229 participants died, 3,194 from CRC. Cox regression revealed significant associations between former (hazard ratio (HR)=1.12; 95%-confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.20) and current smoking (HR = 1.29; 95%CI=1.04-1.60) and poorer overall survival compared with never smoking. Compared with current smoking, smoking cessation was associated with improved overall (HR<10years=0.78; 95%CI=0.69-0.88; HR≥10years=0.78; 95%CI=0.63-0.97) and CRC-specific survival (HR≥10years=0.76; 95%CI=0.67-0.85).

Conclusion: In this large meta-analysis including primary data of incident CRC patients from 14 prospective cohort studies on the association between smoking and CRC prognosis, former and current smoking were associated with poorer CRC prognosis compared with never smoking. Smoking cessation was associated with improved survival when compared with current smokers. Future studies should further quantify the benefits of non-smoking, both for cancer prevention and for improving survival among CRC patients, in particular also in terms of treatment response.

Keywords
Colorectal neoplasms, Meta-analysis, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Survival
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144787 (URN)10.1093/annonc/mdx761 (DOI)000425503100030 ()29244072 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042560145 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
Agudo, A., Cayssials, V., Bonet, C., Tjønneland, A., Overvad, K., Boutron-Ruault, M.-C., . . . Jakszyn, P. (2018). Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 107(4), 607-616
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 107, no 4, p. 607-616Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the 2 major types of gastric cancer. Several foods, nutrients, and nonnutrient food components seem to be involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation. We assessed the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and the risk of gastric carcinoma, overall and for the 2 major subsites: cardia cancers and noncardia cancers. A total of 476,160 subjects (30% men, 70% women) from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study were followed for 14 y, during which 913 incident cases of gastric carcinoma were identified, including 236 located in the cardia, 341 in the distal part of the stomach (noncardia), and 336 with overlapping or unknown tumor site. The dietary inflammatory potential was assessed by means of an inflammatory score of the diet (ISD), calculated with the use of 28 dietary components and their corresponding inflammatory scores. The association between the ISD and gastric cancer risk was estimated by HRs and 95% CIs calculated by multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for confounders. The inflammatory potential of the diet was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The HR (95% CI) for each increase in 1 SD of the ISD were 1.25 (1.12, 1.39) for all gastric cancers, 1.30 (1.06, 1.59) for cardia cancers, and 1.07 (0.89, 1.28) for noncardia cancers. The corresponding values for the highest compared with the lowest quartiles of the ISD were 1.66 (1.26, 2.20), 1.94 (1.14, 3.30), and 1.07 (0.70, 1.70), respectively. Our results suggest that low-grade chronic inflammation induced by the diet may be associated with gastric cancer risk. This pattern seems to be more consistent for gastric carcinomas located in the cardia than for those located in the distal stomach. This study is listed on the ISRCTN registry as ISRCTN12136108.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Nutrition, 2018
Keywords
gastric cancer, nutrition, chronic inflammation, inflammatory score of the diet, prospective studies
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147327 (URN)10.1093/ajcn/nqy002 (DOI)000429449300014 ()29635497 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Asli, L. A., Braaten, T., Olsen, A., Tjonneland, A., Overvad, K., Nilsson, L. M., . . . Skeie, G. (2018). Potato consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the HELGA cohort. British Journal of Nutrition, 119(12), 1408-1415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potato consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the HELGA cohort
Show others...
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 119, no 12, p. 1408-1415Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Potatoes have been a staple food in many countries throughout the years. Potatoes have a high glycaemic index (GI) score, and high GI has been associated with several chronic diseases and cancers. Still, the research on potatoes and health is scarce and contradictive, and we identified no prospective studies that had investigated the association between potatoes as a single food and the risk of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the association between potato consumption and pancreatic cancer among 114 240 men and women in the prospective HELGA cohort, using Cox proportional hazard models. Information on diet (validated FFQ's), lifestyle and health was collected by means of a questionnaire, and 221 pancreatic cancer cases were identified through cancer registries. The mean follow-up time was 11.4 (95 % CI 0.3, 169) years. High consumption of potatoes showed a non-significantly higher risk of pancreatic cancer in the adjusted model (hazard ratio (HR) 1.44; 95 % CI 0.93, 2.22, P-for trend 0.030) when comparing the highest v. the lowest quartile of potato consumption. In the sex-specific analyses, significant associations were found for females (HR 2.00; 95 % CI 1.07, 3.72, P-for trend 0.020), but not for males (HR 1.01; 95 % CI 0.56, 1.84, P-for trend 0.34). In addition, we explored the associations by spline regression, and the absence of dose-response effects was confirmed. In this study, high potato consumption was not consistently associated with a higher risk of pancreatic cancer. Further studies with larger populations are needed to explore the possible sex difference.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
Cohort studies, Epidemiology, Potatoes, Cancer
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150172 (URN)10.1017/S0007114518000788 (DOI)000434283800008 ()29845900 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-18 Created: 2018-07-18 Last updated: 2018-07-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications