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diva2:1353499
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ensamkommande barns placering vid SiS särskilda ungdomshem: Vilka place­ras, hur mår de och vilka insatser får de?
2019 (Swedish)In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Antalet asylsökande barn har globalt ökat dramatiskt de senaste åren och Sverige har under flera år mottagit ensamkommande ungdomar. Deras behov har tillgodosetts genom samarbete mellan ett stort antal aktörer. De senaste åren har antalet ensamkommande ungdomar som placerats för tvångsvård vid SiS särskilda ungdomshem ökat. Syftet med denna artikel är att beskriva vad som kännetecknar ensamkommande ungdomar som placeras på SiS särskilda ungdomshem, beträffande bakgrund, asylstatus, hälsa och tillgång till sociala nätverk samt att beskriva de insatser som genomförs vid placering av ensamkommande ungdomar på SiS. Resultaten baseras på en genom-gång av avidentifierade journaler från 25 ensamkommande ungdomar som varit placerade på SiS under 2015, och visar att gruppen som sådan består av en majoritet pojkar, flertalet har traumatiska upplevelser i sitt förflutna, en majoritet har en dokumenterad psykisk ohälsa, tillgången till sociala nätverk i Sverige är begränsad och flertalet saknar uppehållstillstånd i Sverige.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Socialmedicinsk tidskrift, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163495 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Lindgren, U., Ivarsson, A. & Ng, N. (2019). The effect of neighbourhood social capital on child injuries: a gender-stratified analysis. Health & Place, 60, Article ID 102205.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of neighbourhood social capital on child injuries: a gender-stratified analysis
2019 (English)In: Health & Place, Vol. 60, article id 102205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We designed a longitudinal retrospective cohort study to analyse the associations between neighbourhood social capital and child injures. Register data from the Umeå Simsam Lab in Sweden was used to measure child injuries and demographic and socioeconomic factors at individual, household and neighbourhood level. A social capital score from a previous survey was used to measure neighbourhood social capital. We conducted a three-level multilevel negative binomial regression analysis, with children (level 1, N = 77,193) nested within households (level 2, N = 10,465), and households nested within neighbourhoods (level 3, N = 49). The incidence rate of child injuries was lower in high social capital neighbourhoods. When controlling for factors at individual, household and neighbourhood levels, living in a high social capital neighbourhood was protective of injuries among girls, but not among boys. Promoting social capital in local neighbourhoods could be seen as a prevention strategy for injuries among girls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Child injury, Social capital, Neighbourhood effects, Gender, Longitudinal analysis
National Category
Pediatrics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163497 (URN)10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.102205 (DOI)31546173 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Karhina, K., Eriksson, M., Ghazinour, M. & Ng, N. (2019). What determines gender inequalities in social capital in Ukraine?. SSM - Population Health, 8, Article ID 100383.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What determines gender inequalities in social capital in Ukraine?
2019 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 8, article id 100383Article in journal (Other academic) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background

Social capital is a social determinant of health that has an impact on equity and well-being. It may be unequally distributed among any population. The aims of this study are to investigate the distribution of different forms of social capital between men and women in Ukraine and analyse how potential gender inequalities in social capital might be explained and understood in the Ukrainian context.

Method

The national representative cross-sectional data from the European Social Survey (wave 6) was used with a sample of 1377 women and 797 men. Seven outcomes that represent cognitive and structural social capital were constructed i.e. institutional trust, generalised trust, reciprocity, safety, as well as bonding, bridging and linking forms. Multivariate logistic regression and post-regression Fairlies decompositions were used for the analyses.

Results

There are several findings that resulted from the analyses i), access to institutional trust, linking and bridging social capital is very limited; ii), the odds for almost all forms of social capital (besides safety) are lower for men; iii), feeling about income and age explain most of the gender differences and act positively, as well as offsetting the differences.

Conclusion

Social capital is unequally distributed between different population groups. Some forms of social capital have a stronger buffering effect on women than on men in Ukraine. Reducing gender and income inequalities would probably influence the distribution of social capital within the society.

Keywords
social capital, Ukraine, gender, inequality
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159716 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2019.100383 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-06-04 Created: 2019-06-04 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Ghazinour, M. & Hammarström, A. (2018). Different uses of Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory in public mental health research: what is their value for guiding public mental health policy and practice?. Social Theory & Health, 16(4), 414-433
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different uses of Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory in public mental health research: what is their value for guiding public mental health policy and practice?
2018 (English)In: Social Theory & Health, ISSN 1477-8211, E-ISSN 1477-822X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 414-433Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory is appealing as a conceptual tool for guiding public mental health interventions. However, his theory underwent significant changes since its first inception during the late 1970s until his death in 2005, due to which the implications that can be drawn might differ depending on what concepts (i.e. early or later) of the theory is utilized. The aim of this paper was to examine how different concepts of Bronfenbrenner’s theory have been utilized in (public) mental health research, and to analyse the value of these different uses for guiding public mental health policy and practice. A systematic search for articles that have utilized concepts of Bronfenbrenner’s theory within the field of mental health resulted in a review of 16 published papers. We found that one set of papers (N = 10) used the early concepts of ecological systems without investigating interactions between these systems, while another set of papers used the concepts of ecological systems by also investigating interactions within and between these systems (N = 4). Another limited set of papers (N = 2) utilized the later concepts of proximal processes and the PPCT model. Our results show that studies using Bronfenbrenner’s ecological system concepts by clearly considering interactions between and within these systems can result in recommendations that are most useful for guiding public mental health policy and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Social Work
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150965 (URN)10.1057/s41285-018-0065-6 (DOI)000455351600007 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 259-2012-37
Available from: 2018-08-21 Created: 2018-08-21 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Wimelius, M. E. & Ghazinour, M. (2018). 'I stand on my own two feet but need someone who really cares': Social networks and social capital among unaccompanied minors for becoming established in Swedish society. The Journal of Refugee Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'I stand on my own two feet but need someone who really cares': Social networks and social capital among unaccompanied minors for becoming established in Swedish society
2018 (English)In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Settling in a new host country as an unaccompanied minor holds a lot of challenges such as adaptation of new social norms, learning a new language and understanding a new culture. Social networks may foster good conditions for settlement in the host community but little is known about the availability, quality and significance of social networks for unaccompanied minors (UM) in Sweden. The aim of this qualitative grounded-theory situational study was to explore experiences of social networks among UM and the significance of those networks for becoming established in Sweden, based on data from in-depth interviews with 11 young persons. Unaccompanied young persons were broadly found to be involved in three different kinds of networks: professional carers, like-ethnic friends and ‘Swedes’ in general. Networks with professionals (i.e. linking social capital) were perceived as both a secure base and a source of rejection, and could either facilitate or obstruct the establishment. Supporting networks with like-ethnic friends (bonding social capital) proved to be the most available and important resource for becoming established, while access to networks with Swedes (bridging social capital) was in general low but still perceived as important for becoming established, not least for reducing language and cultural barriers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
Unaccompanied minors, social networks, social capital, establishment, Sweden, grounded theory, situational analysis
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150967 (URN)10.1093/jrs/fey030 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-21 Created: 2018-08-21 Last updated: 2019-04-05
Kien, V. D., Van Minh, H., Giang, K. B., Ng, N., Nguyen, V., Tuan, L. T. & Eriksson, M. (2018). Views by health professionals on the responsiveness of commune health stations regarding non-communicable diseases in urban Hanoi, Vietnam: a qualitative study. BMC Health Services Research, 18, Article ID 392.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Views by health professionals on the responsiveness of commune health stations regarding non-communicable diseases in urban Hanoi, Vietnam: a qualitative study
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2018 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Primary health care plays an important role in addressing the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries. In light of the rapid urbanization of Vietnam, this study aims to explore health professionals' views about the responsiveness of primary health care services at commune health stations, particularly regarding the increase of NCDs in urban settings.

METHODS: This qualitative study was conducted in Hanoi from July to August 2015. We implemented 19 in-depth interviews with health staff at four purposely selected commune health stations and conducted a brief inventory of existing NCD activities at these commune health stations. We also interviewed NCD managers at national, provincial, and district levels. The interview guides reflected six components of the WHO health system framework, including service delivery, health workforce, health information systems, access to essential medicines, financing, and leadership/governance. A thematic analysis approach was applied to analyze the interview data in this study.

RESULTS: Six themes, related to the six building blocks of the WHO health systems framework, were identified. These themes explored the responsiveness of commune health stations to NCDs in urban Hanoi. Health staff at commune health stations were not aware of the national strategy for NCDs. Health workers noted the lack of NCD informational materials for management and planning. The limited workforce at health commune stations would benefit from more health workers in general and those with NCD-specific training and skills. In addition, the budget for NCDs at commune health stations remains very limited, with large differences in the implementation of national targeted NCD programs. Some commune health stations had no NCD services available, while others had some programming. A lack of NCD treatment drugs was also noted, with a negative impact on the provision of NCD-related services at commune health stations. These themes were also reflected in the inventory of existing NCD related activities.

CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals view the responsiveness of commune health stations to NCDs in urban Hanoi, Vietnam as weak. Appropriate policies should be implemented to improve the primary health care services on NCDs at commune health stations in urban Hanoi, Vietnam.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Commune health station, Non-communicable disease, Responsiveness, Urban, Vietnam
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150609 (URN)10.1186/s12913-018-3217-4 (DOI)000434084400003 ()29855320 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047956256 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-14 Created: 2018-08-14 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Eklund Wimelius, M., Eriksson, M., Kinsman, J., Strandh, V. & Ghazinour, M. (2018). What is local resilience against radicalization and how can it be promoted?: a multidisciplinary literature review. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is local resilience against radicalization and how can it be promoted?: a multidisciplinary literature review
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2018 (English)In: Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, ISSN 1057-610X, E-ISSN 1521-0731Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this research note, we present results from a review of research on local resilience in relation to radicalization in public health, social work, crisis management, and community policing using terrorism studies as a point of departure. In order to identify agreements between literatures, we focus on how local resilience is understood, how it is said to be promoted, and how this knowledge could be synthesized. We show that resilience by and large is understood as both a process and a capacity underpinned by cooperation, social networks, and community resources and that an initial mapping of existing strengths and resources is pivotal for local resilience-building.

Keywords
local, resilience, radicalization
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
statskunskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153451 (URN)10.1080/1057610X.2018.1531532 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, 2016-488
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Lindgren, U., Ivarsson, A. & Ng, N. (2017). Child health and place: How is neighborhood social capital associated with child health injuries?. Paper presented at 10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities Stockholm, Sweden 1–4 November 2017. European Journal of Public Health, 27(Suppl_3), 41-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Child health and place: How is neighborhood social capital associated with child health injuries?
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl_3, p. 41-41Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Child health inequalities can be explained by social determinants of health, including neighborhood social capital. Swedish research about place effects on children's health is limited. This project aims to contribute to knowledge on how neighborhood social capital may influence child health in the Swedish context. The overall research questions were: What is the incidence rate of child injuries in the living environments among boys and girls? What are the associations between neighborhood social capital and child injuries?

Methods: Child injury data from the Umeå SIMSAM Lab were utilized, with data from all children 0-12 years of age, living in Umeå municipality during 2006-2009. Individual child injury and residential area data were linked to a neighborhood social capital index, where 49 defined neighborhoods were assigned a score from low- high in social capital, based on people’s perceptions about their neighborhoods. Individual, household and neighborhood demographic and socioeconomic variables (country of birth, educational level, income and family type) were also extracted from the Umeå SIMSAM lab. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze factors associated with child injury.

Results: We observed 3930 injury events that occurred in the living environments, experienced by 24 000 children who lived in 14 767 households within 49 neighborhoods. The incidence rate of child injuries was about 72.5/1000 for boys and 60/1000 for girls. The odds for child injures was lower in neighborhoods with high social capital compared to neighborhoods with low social capital (OR 0.87 95%CI 0.80-0.95) after controlling for demographic and socioeconomic factors at individual, household and neighborhood level. The protective effects of neighborhood social capital were stronger for girls than boys.

Conclusions: Neighborhood social capital may have a protective effect on child injuries and especially so for girls.

Key messages:

  • Neighborhood conditions have a significant influence on child health inequalities in the Swedish context, including inequalities in child injuries.
  • Mobilization of neighborhood social capital might be good investment for reducing child injuries.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143148 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckx187.104 (DOI)000414389800084 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Conference
10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities Stockholm, Sweden 1–4 November 2017
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Eklund Wimelius, M., Eriksson, M., Ghazinour, M., Kinsman, J., Strandh, V. & Sundqvist, J. (2017). Den lokala nivåns betydelse i det förebyggande arbetet mot våldsbejakande islamistisk extremism. In: Christofer Edling och Amir Rostamni (Ed.), Våldsbejakande extremism: en forskarantologi (pp. 225--255). Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Den lokala nivåns betydelse i det förebyggande arbetet mot våldsbejakande islamistisk extremism
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2017 (Swedish)In: Våldsbejakande extremism: en forskarantologi / [ed] Christofer Edling och Amir Rostamni, Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer, 2017, p. 225--255Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer, 2017
Series
Statens offentliga utredningar, ISSN 0375-250X ; 2017:67
Keywords
lokal nivå, förebyggande arbete, våldsbejakande islamistisk extremism
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142035 (URN)978-91-38-24663-4 (ISBN)
Projects
Lokal resiliens mot radikalisering och våldsbejakande extremism – från ett krisberedskapsperspektiv
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency
Available from: 2017-11-17 Created: 2017-11-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Karhina, K., Ghazinour, M., Ng, N. & Eriksson, M. (2017). Social capital transformation, voluntarily services and mental health during times of military conflict in Ukraine. Global Journal of Health Science, 9(5), 141-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social capital transformation, voluntarily services and mental health during times of military conflict in Ukraine
2017 (English)In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, E-ISSN 1916-9744, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 141-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The effects of war as well as military conflict include long-term physical and psychological harm to children and adults. Social relations and trust play a role in peace building and conflict resolution. Social capital is believed to facilitate institutional and interpersonal trust as well as safety and security, and thus may become an important resource in times of military conflict.

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to analyse how social capital may be transformed due to a military conflict in contemporary Ukraine and to explore the role of voluntarily services in this change. Further we aim to discuss the possible influence of social capital transformation on mental health in times of military conflict.

METHODS: A qualitative case study design was chosen to explore it. In-depth interviews were chosen as a method for data collection. Informant’s selection criteria were: either to be involved in volunteering activities in the city of Khmelnitsky (which is the place of research) or to receive volunteering help. 18 interviews were conducted.

Informants were reached by snowball sampling. Interviews are collected, transcribed, translated and analyzed using constructive Grounded Theory approach of Charmaz.

RESULTS: Our results show that social capital transforms during military conflict experiences. The changes happen both in cognitive and structural components since they are connected. The most important changes occur in bonding social capital, where new formation such as brotherhood, emerges and replaces previous bonding ties with family and friends. In addition, voluntarily acting actors (those who normally belong to bridging social capital) transform into relations with bonding entities. New forms of social capital are thus generated through the existence of voluntary services, and these networks provide essential social support in times of military conflict. Perceived support softens negative emotional responses to traumatic events. In line with the stress-buffering model, our results support that the formation of new social capital in times of military conflict may protect against the negative mental health effects of these experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2017
Keywords
social capital, crisis, influence on health, volunteering, military conflict
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139704 (URN)10.5539/gjhs.v9n5p141 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0108-4237

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