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Grebe, S., Trotta, A., Bajwa, A. A., Suorsa, M., Gollan, P. J., Jansson, S., . . . Aro, E.-M. (2019). The unique photosynthetic apparatus of Pinaceae: analysis of photosynthetic complexes in Picea abies. Journal of Experimental Botany, 70(12), 3211-3225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The unique photosynthetic apparatus of Pinaceae: analysis of photosynthetic complexes in Picea abies
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 70, no 12, p. 3211-3225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pinaceae are the predominant photosynthetic species in boreal forests, but so far no detailed description of the protein components of the photosynthetic apparatus of these gymnosperms has been available. In this study we report a detailed characterization of the thylakoid photosynthetic machinery of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst). We first customized a spruce thylakoid protein database from translated transcript sequences combined with existing protein sequences derived from gene models, which enabled reliable tandem mass spectrometry identification of P. abies thylakoid proteins from two-dimensional large pore blue-native/SDS-PAGE. This allowed a direct comparison of the two-dimensional protein map of thylakoid protein complexes from P. abies with the model angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana. Although the subunit composition of P. abies core PSI and PSII complexes is largely similar to that of Arabidopsis, there was a high abundance of a smaller PSI subcomplex, closely resembling the assembly intermediate PSI* complex. In addition, the evolutionary distribution of light-harvesting complex (LHC) family members of Pinaceae was compared in silico with other land plants, revealing that P. abies and other Pinaceae (also Gnetaceae and Welwitschiaceae) have lost LHCB4, but retained LHCB8 (formerly called LHCB4.3). The findings reported here show the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus of P. abies and other Pinaceae members to be unique among land plants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Blue native gel, conifer, light harvesting, photosystem, Picea abies (Norway spruce), Pinaceae, thylakoid protein complexes
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164434 (URN)10.1093/jxb/erz127 (DOI)000484414200017 ()30938447 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-22 Created: 2019-10-22 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved
Wang, J., Ding, J., Tan, B., Robinson, K. M., Michelson, I. H., Johansson, A., . . . Ingvarsson, P. K. (2018). A major locus controls local adaptation and adaptive life history variation in a perennial plant. Genome Biology, 19, Article ID 72.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A major locus controls local adaptation and adaptive life history variation in a perennial plant
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2018 (English)In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 19, article id 72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The initiation of growth cessation and dormancy represent critical life history trade offs between survival and growth and have important fitness effects in perennial plants Such adaptive life history traits often show strong local adaptation along environmental gradients but, despite then importance, the genetic architecture of these traits remains poorly understood.

Results: We integrate whole genome re sequencing with environmental and phenotypic data from common garden experiments to investigate the genomic basis of local adaptation across a latitudinal gradient in European aspen (Populus tremula). A single genomic region containing the PtFT2 gene mediates local adaptation in the timing of bud set and explains 65% of the observed genetic variation in bud set This locus is the likely target of a recent selective sweep that originated right before or during colonization of northern Scandinavia following the last glaciation Field and greenhouse experiments confirm that variation in PtFT2 gene expression affects the phenotypic variation in bud set that we observe in wild natural populations.

Conclusions: Our results reveal a major effect locus that determines the timing of bud set and that has facilitated rapid adaptation to shorter growing seasons and colder climates in European aspen. The discovery of a single locus explaining a substantial fraction of the variation in a key life-history trait is remarkable, given that such traits are generally considered to be highly polygenic. These findings provide a dramatic illustration of how loci of large effect for adaptive traits can arise and be maintained over large geographical scales in natural populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Populus tremula, Local adaptation, Genomic basis, PtFT2, Adaptive traits, Selective sweep
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150175 (URN)10.1186/s13059-018-1444-y (DOI)000434210500001 ()29866176 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-07-18 Created: 2018-07-18 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Michelson, I. H., Ingvarsson, P. K., Robinson, K. M., Edlund, E., Eriksson, M. E., Nilsson, O. & Jansson, S. (2018). Autumn senescence in aspen is not triggered by day length. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 162(1), 123-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autumn senescence in aspen is not triggered by day length
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2018 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 162, no 1, p. 123-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Autumn senescence in mature aspens, grown under natural conditions, is initiated at almost the same date every year. The mechanism of such precise timing is not understood but we have previously shown that the signal must be derived from light. We studied variation in bud set and autumn senescence in a collection of 116 natural Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula) genotypes, from 12 populations in Sweden and planted in one northern and one southern common garden, to test the hypothesis that onset of autumn senescence is triggered by day length. We confirmed that, although bud set seemed to be triggered by a critical photoperiod/day length, other factors may influence it. The data on initiation of autumn senescence, on the other hand, were incompatible with the trigger being the day length per se, hence the trigger must be some other light-dependent factor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143636 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12593 (DOI)000418236000008 ()28591431 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Law, S. R., Chrobok, D., Juvany, M., Delhomme, N., Lindén, P., Brouwer, B., . . . Keech, O. (2018). Darkened leaves use different metabolic strategies for senescence and survival. Plant Physiology, 177(1), 132-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Darkened leaves use different metabolic strategies for senescence and survival
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2018 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 132-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In plants, an individually darkened leaf initiates senescence much more rapidly than a leaf from a whole darkened plant. Combining transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we present an overview of the metabolic strategies that are employed in response to different darkening treatments. Under darkened plant conditions, the perception of carbon starvation drove a profound metabolic readjustment in which branched-chain amino acids and potentially monosaccharides released from cell wall loosening became important substrates for maintaining minimal ATP production. Concomitantly, the increased accumulation of amino acids with a high nitrogen-carbon ratio may provide a safety mechanism for the storage of metabolically derived cytotoxic ammonium and a pool of nitrogen for use upon returning to typical growth conditions. Conversely, in individually darkened leaf, the metabolic profiling that followed our 13C-enrichment assays revealed a temporal and differential exchange of metabolites, including sugars and amino acids, between the darkened leaf and the rest of the plant. This active transport could be the basis for a progressive metabolic shift in the substrates fueling mitochondrial activities, which are central to the catabolic reactions facilitating the retrieval of nutrients from the senescing leaf. We propose a model illustrating the specific metabolic strategies employed by leaves in response to these two darkening treatments, which support either rapid senescence or a strong capacity for survival.

Keywords
Arabidopsis thaliana, senescence, metabolism, dark induced senescence, survival
National Category
Botany
Research subject
biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147675 (URN)10.1104/pp.18.00062 (DOI)000431347500015 ()29523713 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Pribil, M., Sandoval-Ibanez, O., Xu, W., Sharma, A., Labs, M., Liu, Q., . . . Leister, D. (2018). Fine-Tuning of Photosynthesis Requires CURVATURE THYLAKOID1-Mediated Thylakoid Plasticity. Plant Physiology, 176(3), 2351-2364
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fine-Tuning of Photosynthesis Requires CURVATURE THYLAKOID1-Mediated Thylakoid Plasticity
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2018 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 176, no 3, p. 2351-2364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The thylakoid membrane system of higher plant chloroplasts consists of interconnected subdomains of appressed and nonappressed membrane bilayers, known as grana and stroma lamellae, respectively. CURVATURE THYLAKOID1 (CURT1) protein complexes mediate the shape of grana stacks in a dosage-dependent manner and facilitate membrane curvature at the grana margins, the interface between grana and stroma lamellae. Although grana stacks are highly conserved among land plants, the functional relevance of grana stacking remains unclear. Here, we show that inhibiting CURT1-mediated alteration of thylakoid ultrastructure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) reduces photosynthetic efficiency and plant fitness under adverse, controlled, and natural light conditions. Plants that lack CURT1 show less adjustment of grana diameter, which compromises regulatory mechanisms like the photosystem II repair cycle and state transitions. Interestingly, CURT1A suffices to induce thylakoid membrane curvature in planta and thylakoid hyperbending in plants overexpressing CURT1A. We suggest that CURT1 oligomerization is regulated at the posttranslational level in a light-dependent fashion and that CURT1-mediated thylakoid plasticity plays an important role in fine-tuning photosynthesis and plant fitness during challenging growth conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Plant Biologist, 2018
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146224 (URN)10.1104/pp.17.00863 (DOI)000426848300037 ()29374108 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-07 Created: 2018-05-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lin, Y.-C., Wang, J., Delhomme, N., Schiffthaler, B., Sundström, G., Zuccolo, A., . . . Street, N. R. (2018). Functional and evolutionary genomic inferences in Populus through genome and population sequencing of American and European aspen. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 115(46), E10970-E10978
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional and evolutionary genomic inferences in Populus through genome and population sequencing of American and European aspen
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, no 46, p. E10970-E10978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Populus genus is one of the major plant model systems, but genomic resources have thus far primarily been available for poplar species, and primarily Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray), which was the first tree with a whole-genome assembly. To further advance evolutionary and functional genomic analyses in Populus, we produced genome assemblies and population genetics resources of two aspen species, Populus tremula L. and Populus tremuloides Michx. The two aspen species have distributions spanning the Northern Hemisphere, where they are keystone species supporting a wide variety of dependent communities and produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites. Our analyses show that the two aspens share a similar genome structure and a highly conserved gene content with P. trichocarpa but display substantially higher levels of heterozygosity. Based on population resequencing data, we observed widespread positive and negative selection acting on both coding and noncoding regions. Furthermore, patterns of genetic diversity and molecular evolution in aspen are influenced by a number of features, such as expression level, coexpression network connectivity, and regulatory variation. To maximize the community utility of these resources, we have integrated all presented data within the PopGenIE web resource (PopGenIE.org).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATL ACAD SCIENCES, 2018
Keywords
genome assembly, natural selection, coexpression, population genetics, Populus
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154950 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1801437115 (DOI)000449934400020 ()30373829 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056516875 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Jansson, S. (2018). Gene-edited plants on the plate: the 'CRISPR cabbage story'. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 164(4), 396-405
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene-edited plants on the plate: the 'CRISPR cabbage story'
2018 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 164, no 4, p. 396-405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The European Union (EU) has very strict regulations for genetically modified plants, but gene editing challenges the basis of the legislation. Genome editied plants with no foreign DNA added were according to the Swedish competent authority Jordbruksverket falling outside of the EU definition of genetically modified plants, and should hence not be regulated. This article describes the background to this interpretation and also how plants gene edited using CRISPR-Cas9 (a Brassica deletion mutant) for the first (?) time were grown in a garden, cooked and eaten, and the subsequent media attention. Furthermore, it also adresses the troubles authorities in other European countries have to handle these plants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155116 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12754 (DOI)000453411500005 ()29744888 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Jansson, S. (2018). Gene-edited plants: What is happening now?. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 164(4), 370-371
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene-edited plants: What is happening now?
2018 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 164, no 4, p. 370-371Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155112 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12853 (DOI)000453411500001 ()30461029 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Myouga, F., Takahashi, K., Tanaka, R., Nagata, N., Kiss, A. Z., Funk, C., . . . Shinozaki, K. (2018). Stable accumulation of photosystem II requires one-helix protein1 (OHP1) of the light harvesting-like family. Plant Physiology, 176(3), 2277-2291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stable accumulation of photosystem II requires one-helix protein1 (OHP1) of the light harvesting-like family
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2018 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 176, no 3, p. 2277-2291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cellular functions of two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) one-helix proteins, OHP1 and OHP2 (also named LIGH-THARVESTING-LIKE2 [LIL2] and LIL6, respectively, because they have sequence similarity to light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins), remain unclear. Tagged null mutants of OHP1 and OHP2 (ohp1 and ohp2) showed stunted growth with pale-green leaves on agar plates, and these mutants were unable to grow on soil. Leaf chlorophyll fluorescence and the composition of thylakoid membrane proteins revealed that ohp1 deletion substantially affected photosystem II (PSII) core protein function and led to reduced levels of photosystem I core proteins; however, it did not affect LHC accumulation. Transgenic ohp1 plants rescued with OHP1-HA or OHP1-Myc proteins developed a normal phenotype. Using these tagged OHP1 proteins in transgenic plants, we localized OHP1 to thylakoid membranes, where it formed protein complexes with both OHP2 and High Chlorophyll Fluorescence244 (HCF244). We also found PSII core proteins D1/D2, HCF136, and HCF173 and a few other plant-specific proteins associated with the OHP1/OHP2-HCF244 complex, suggesting that these complexes are early intermediates in PSII assembly. OHP1 interacted directly with HCF244 in the complex. Therefore, OHP1 and HCF244 play important roles in the stable accumulation of PSII.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Plant Biologists, 2018
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146226 (URN)10.1104/pp.17.01782 (DOI)000426848300032 ()29438089 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Mishra, Y., Hall, M., Locmelis, R., Nam, K., Söderberg, C. A. G., Storm, P., . . . Sauer, U. H. (2017). Active-site plasticity revealed in the asymmetric dimer of AnPrx6 the 1-Cys peroxiredoxin and molecular chaperone from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 17151.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Active-site plasticity revealed in the asymmetric dimer of AnPrx6 the 1-Cys peroxiredoxin and molecular chaperone from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 17151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are vital regulators of intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in all living organisms. Their activity depends on one or two catalytically active cysteine residues, the peroxidatic Cys (C-P) and, if present, the resolving Cys (C-R). A detailed catalytic cycle has been derived for typical 2-Cys Prxs, however, little is known about the catalytic cycle of 1-Cys Prxs. We have characterized Prx6 from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 (AnPrx6) and found that in addition to the expected peroxidase activity, AnPrx6 can act as a molecular chaperone in its dimeric state, contrary to other Prxs. The AnPrx6 crystal structure at 2.3 angstrom resolution reveals different active site conformations in each monomer of the asymmetric obligate homo-dimer. Molecular dynamic simulations support the observed structural plasticity. A FSH motif, conserved in 1-Cys Prxs, precedes the active site PxxxTxxCp signature and might contribute to the 1-Cys Prx reaction cycle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017
National Category
Structural Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143523 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-17044-3 (DOI)000417354200004 ()29215017 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85038074530 (Scopus ID)
Note

The original version of this Article contained an error in the title of the paper, where “Anabaena sp. PCC 7120” was incorrectly given as “Anabaena sp. PCC 7210”. This has now been corrected in the PDF and HTML versions of the Article, and in the accompanying Supplementary Information file.

Errata: Author Correction: Active-site plasticity revealed in the asymmetric dimer of AnPrx6 the 1-Cys peroxiredoxin and molecular chaperone from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Scientifc reports. 2018;8:8658. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-26715-8

Available from: 2018-01-04 Created: 2018-01-04 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
Projects
How do trees know it is autumn? [2009-05669_VR]; Umeå UniversityINFORMATIVE GENETICS MARKERS FOR TREES [2010-1450_Formas]; Umeå UniversityStructure and function of the proteins of the LHC family [2012-04755_VR]; Umeå UniversityHOW DO TREES KNOW IT IS AUTUMN? [2015-907_Formas]; Umeå UniversityHow do trees survive the winter? [2016-04894_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7906-6891

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