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Själander, Anders
Publications (10 of 55) Show all publications
Björck, F., Kadhim, H. & Själander, A. (2019). Predictors for INR-control in a well-managed warfarin treatment setting. Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, 47(2), 227-232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors for INR-control in a well-managed warfarin treatment setting
2019 (English)In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Warfarin is well studied in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). It has low complication rates for patients achieving individual Time in Therapeutic Range (iTTR)>70%. The risk scores SAMe-TT2R2 and PROSPER are designed to predict future TTR, but are derived from a heterogeneous population with generally low iTTR. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors for high and low iTTR in an AF population in Sweden, where there is a generally good anticoagulation control. A retrospective register study based on Swedish warfarin dosing system AuriculA, including 28,011 AF patients starting treatment during 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2011. Complications and risk factors were analysed and related to iTTR. Mean age was 73.7 (SD +/- 9.5) years, with 42.0% women. Mean CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score (SD) was 3.6 (+/- 1.7). For patients with iTTR<60% there were over three times higher prevalence of excessive alcohol consumption than for patients with iTTR>70% (3.7% vs. 1.1%). Previous stroke were more prevalent for patients with high than low iTTR (17.1% vs. 20.3%). Concomitant comorbidities were associated with increased risk of poor iTTR. In Swedish AF patients, excessive alcohol use is clearly associated with iTTR below 60%. Patients with previous stroke are more likely to get iTTR above 70%, unlike those with concomitant disorders who more often have poor anticoagulation control. The SAMe-TT2R2-score cannot be applied in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Oral anticoagulation, Time in therapeutic range, Atrial fibrillation, Stroke
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157599 (URN)10.1007/s11239-018-1765-4 (DOI)000459806100009 ()30411185 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Spronk, H. M., Padro, T., Siland, J. E., Prochaska, J. H., Winters, J., van der Wal, A. C., . . . ten Cate, H. (2018). Atherothrombosis and Thromboembolism: Position Paper from the Second Maastricht Consensus Conference on Thrombosis. Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 118(2), 229-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atherothrombosis and Thromboembolism: Position Paper from the Second Maastricht Consensus Conference on Thrombosis
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2018 (English)In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 229-250Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Atherothrombosis is a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality and long-term morbidity. Platelets and coagulation proteases, interacting with circulating cells and in different vascular beds, modify several complex pathologies including atherosclerosis. In the second Maastricht Consensus Conference on Thrombosis, this theme was addressed by diverse scientists from bench to bedside. All presentations were discussed with audience members and the results of these discussions were incorporated in the final document that presents a state-of-the-art reflection of expert opinions and consensus recommendations regarding the following five topics:

1. Risk factors, biomarkers and plaque instability: In atherothrombosis research, more focus on the contribution of specific risk factors like ectopic fat needs to be considered; definitions of atherothrombosis are important distinguishing different phases of disease, including plaque (in) stability; proteomic and metabolomics data are to be added to genetic information.

2. Circulating cells including platelets and atherothrombosis: Mechanisms of leukocyte and macrophage plasticity, migration, and transformation in murine atherosclerosis need to be considered; diseasemechanism-based biomarkers need to be identified; experimental systems are needed that incorporatewhole-blood flow to understand how red blood cells influence thrombus formation and stability; knowledge on platelet heterogeneity and priming conditions needs to be translated toward the in vivo situation.

3. Coagulation proteases, fibrin(ogen) and thrombus formation: The role of factor (F) XI in thrombosis including the lower margins of this factor related to safe and effective antithrombotic therapy needs to be established; FXI is a key regulator in linking platelets, thrombin generation, and inflammatory mechanisms in a renin-angiotensin dependent manner; however, the impact on thrombin-dependent PAR signaling needs further study; the fundamental mechanisms in FXIII biology and biochemistry and its impact on thrombus biophysical characteristics need to be explored; the interactions of red cells and fibrin formation and its consequences for thrombus formation and lysis need to be addressed. Platelet-fibrin interactions are pivotal determinants of clot formation and stability with potential therapeutic consequences.

4. Preventive and acute treatment of atherothrombosis and arterial embolism; novel ways and tailoring? The role of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-4 vis a vis PAR-1 as target for antithrombotic therapy merits study; ongoing trials on platelet function test-based antiplatelet therapy adjustment support development of practically feasible tests; risk scores for patients with atrial fibrillation need refinement, taking new biomarkers including coagulation into account; risk scores that consider organ system differences in bleeding may have added value; all forms of oral anticoagulant treatment require better organization, including education and emergency access; laboratory testing still needs rapidly available sensitive tests with short turnaround time.

5. Pleiotropy of coagulation proteases, thrombus resolution and ischaemia-reperfusion: Biobanks specifically for thrombus storage and analysis are needed; further studies on novelmodified activated protein C-based agents are required including its cytoprotective properties; new avenues for optimizing treatment of patients with ischaemic stroke are needed, also including novel agents that modify fibrinolytic activity (aimed at plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SCHATTAUER GMBH-VERLAG MEDIZIN NATURWISSENSCHAFTEN, 2018
Keywords
atherothrombosis, arterial thrombosis, coagulation, platelets, antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulants, herosclerosis, ischaemic stroke, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144944 (URN)10.1160/TH17-07-0492 (DOI)000423998900001 ()29378352 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Själander, S., Sjögren, V., Renlund, H., Norrving, B. & Själander, A. (2018). Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban vs. high TTR warfarin in atrial fibrillation. Thrombosis Research, 167, 113-118
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban vs. high TTR warfarin in atrial fibrillation
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2018 (English)In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 167, p. 113-118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: New oral anticoagulants are non-inferior compared with warfarin regarding stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, with similar or decreased risk of bleeding. However, it is unclear whether high TTR warfarin is as effective and safe as NOACs. Our objective was to investigate efficacy and safety of apixaban, dabigatran or rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in clinical practice.

Materials and methods: Nationwide retrospective cohort study based on Swedish quality registries. Atrial fibrillation patients initiated on apixaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban or warfarin between 2013-01-01 and 2015-1231 were included. Main outcome measures were all-cause stroke and systemic embolism, all-cause stroke, ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke; major bleeding, intracranial bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, other bleeding (fatal or requiring hospital care); all-cause mortality; myocardial infarction.

Results: The study included 64,382 patients corresponding to 81,176 treatment years. Of these, 37,174 patients were instituted on warfarin, 6574 on dabigatran, 8323 on rivaroxaban and 12,311 on apixaban. In warfarin treated patients, the time in therapeutic range was 71.4%. After propensity score matching, there was no significant difference in risk of stroke or systemic embolism between NOAC and warfarin treated patients. Hazard ratios for major bleeding events were 0.63(95% CI 0.52-0.75) for apixaban, 0.74(0.62-0.87) for dabigatran and 1.06(0.92-1.23) for rivaroxaban, compared with warfarin.

Conclusions: This study showed no difference between apixaban, dabigatran, or rivaroxaban compared to high TTR warfarin treatment regarding stroke prevention. However, fewer bleeding events were seen for apixaban and dabigatran, but not for rivaroxaban. Further studies are needed on the comparability of individual NOACs with respect to bleeding risks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Oral anticoagulation, Time in therapeutic range, Atrial fibrillation, Stroke
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150736 (URN)10.1016/j.thromres.2018.05.022 (DOI)000437845800020 ()29803981 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047246795 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Hultin, M., Själander, A., Edin, B., Warglo, Z. & Wennberg, Å. (2018). Sänkta krav på utländska läkare vore förödande. Dagens Samhälle (4 dec)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sänkta krav på utländska läkare vore förödande
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2018 (Swedish)In: Dagens Samhälle, ISSN 1652-6511, no 4 decArticle in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Det är avgörande att det ställs samma höga krav på läkare från länder utanför EU som på svenskutbildade. Bilden av att det ställs olika krav på olika grupper vore förödande, skriver ansvariga för kunskapsprovet för läkare vid Umeå universitet ihop med Socialstyrelsen.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153933 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Wadell, D., Jensen, J., Englund, E. & Själander, A. (2018). Triple therapy after PCI - Warfarin treatment quality and bleeding risk. PLoS ONE, 13(12), Article ID e0209187.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Triple therapy after PCI - Warfarin treatment quality and bleeding risk
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0209187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A combination of warfarin, aspirin and clopidogrel is indicated after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in some patients, despite the higher risk of bleeding inferred by this triple therapy.

Objectives: Whether the treatment quality of warfarin measured by iTTR (individual time within therapeutic INR range) is associated with bleeding complications during triple therapy after PCI.

Methods: A retrospective register study consisting of 601 triple treated PCI patients from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR). The cohort was cross-matched with the Swedish Patient Registry for background characteristics and bleeding complications up to 6 months after PCI using ICD10 codes, the Prescribed Drug Registry for ongoing medications, and the national oral anticoagulation registry Auricula for warfarin treatment quality. The patients were grouped into four iTTR groups: <50%, 50–69.9%, 70–84.9% and >85% as well as iTTR above or below 70%.

Results: Of 601 patients, 39 (6.5%) had a bleeding complication (type 2 according to BARC). Bleeding was more common for iTTR<70% compared to iTTR>70%, 28 (9.3%) vs. 11 (3.7%) (p = 0.005). The bleeding frequency increased gradually from the best group, iTTR>85% with four bleeders (3.3%) up to 17 bleeders (13.3%) in the worst group with iTTR<50% (p = 0.003), with a corresponding bleeding rate per 100 treatment years of 8.0 and 44.9, respectively. In multivariate analysis low BMI, HR 1.11 (95% CI 1.01–1.22), a medical history of anemia HR 3.17 (1.16–8.69) and iTTR < 70% HR 2.86 (1.25–6.53) increased the risk of bleeding.

Conclusion: Triple therapy after PCI confers a high risk of bleeding events. Warfarin treatment quality measured by iTTR as well as a medical history of anemia are strong independent predictors of bleeding in these patients. Physicians should pay more attention to iTTR after PCI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library Science, 2018
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155102 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0209187 (DOI)000453774100040 ()30562365 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Hultin, M., Edin, B. B. & Själander, A. (2018). Two Years Experiences of a new Swedish National Proficiency Test for Doctors of Medicine.. In: Abstract book: . Paper presented at AMEE, Basel. undee
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two Years Experiences of a new Swedish National Proficiency Test for Doctors of Medicine.
2018 (English)In: Abstract book, undee, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
undee: , 2018
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150264 (URN)
Conference
AMEE, Basel
Available from: 2018-07-30 Created: 2018-07-30 Last updated: 2018-07-30
Söderlund, S., Dahlén, T., Sandin, F., Olsson-Strömberg, U., Creignou, M., Dreimane, A., . . . Höglund, M. (2017). Advanced phase chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era: a report from the Swedish CML register. European Journal of Haematology, 98(1), 57-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advanced phase chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era: a report from the Swedish CML register
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The primary goal in management of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is to prevent disease progression to accelerated phase (AP) or blast crisis (BC). We have evaluated progression rates in a decentralised healthcare setting and characterised patients progressing to AP/BC on TKI treatment.

METHODS: Using data from the Swedish CML register, we identified CP-CML patients diagnosed 2007-2011 who progressed to AP/BC within 2 yrs from diagnosis (n = 18) as well as patients diagnosed in advanced phase during 2007-2012 (n = 36) from a total of 544 newly diagnosed CML cases. We evaluated baseline characteristics, progression rates, outcome and adherence to guidelines for monitoring and treatment.

RESULTS: The cumulative progression rate at 2 yrs was 4.3%. All 18 progression cases had been treated with imatinib, and six progressed within 6 months. High-risk EUTOS score was associated to a higher risk of progression. Insufficient cytogenetic and/or molecular monitoring was found in 33%. Median survival after transformation during TKI treatment was 1.4 yrs. In those presenting with BC and AP, median survival was 1.6 yrs and not reached, respectively.

CONCLUSION: In this population-based setting, progression rates appear comparable to that reported from clinical trials, with similar dismal patient outcome. Improved adherence to CML guidelines may minimise the risk of disease progression.

Keywords
chronic myeloid leukaemia, accelerated phase, blast crisis, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, population-based
National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127523 (URN)10.1111/ejh.12785 (DOI)000393166600009 ()27428357 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-15 Created: 2016-11-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Själander, S., Holmqvist, F., Smith, J. G., Platonov, P. G., Kesek, M., Svensson, P. J., . . . Själander, A. (2017). Assessment of use vs discontinuation of oral anticoagulation after pulmonary vein isolation in patients with atrial fibrillation. JAMA cardiology, 2(2), 146-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of use vs discontinuation of oral anticoagulation after pulmonary vein isolation in patients with atrial fibrillation
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2017 (English)In: JAMA cardiology, ISSN 2380-6583, E-ISSN 2380-6591, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 146-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a recommended treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation, but it is unclear whether it results in a lower risk of stroke.

Objectives: To investigate the proportion of patients discontinuing anticoagulation treatment after PVI in association with the CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years [doubled], diabetes, stroke [doubled], vascular disease, age 65-74 years, sex category [female]) score, identify factors predicting stroke after PVI, and explore the risk of cardiovascular events after PVI in patients with and without guideline-recommended anticoagulation treatment.

Design, Setting, and Participants: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Swedish national health registries from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2012, with a mean-follow up of 2.6 years. A total of 1585 patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing PVI from the Swedish Catheter Ablation Register were included, with information about exposure to warfarin in the national quality register Auricula. Data analysis was performed from January 1, 2015, to April 30, 2016.

Exposures: Warfarin treatment.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and death.

Results: In this cohort of 1585 patients, 73.0% were male, the mean (SD) age was 59.0 (9.4) years, and the mean (SD) CHA2DS2-VASc score was 1.5 (1.4). Of the 1585 patients, 1175 were followed up for more than 1 year after PVI. Of these, 360 (30.6%) discontinued warfarin treatment during the first year. In patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2 or more, patients discontinuing warfarin treatment had a higher rate of ischemic stroke (5 events in 312 years at risk [1.6% per year]) compared with those continuing warfarin treatment (4 events in 1192 years at risk [0.3% per year]) (P = .046). Patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2 or more or those who had previously experienced an ischemic stroke displayed a higher risk of stroke if warfarin treatment was discontinued (hazard ratio, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.2-17.2; P = .02 and hazard ratio, 13.7; 95% CI, 2.0-91.9; P = .007, respectively).

Conclusions and Relevance: These findings indicate that discontinuation of warfarin treatment after PVI is not safe in high-risk patients, especially those who have previously experienced an ischemic stroke.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association, 2017
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128516 (URN)10.1001/jamacardio.2016.4179 (DOI)000401908200007 ()27893055 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-06 Created: 2016-12-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sandén, P., Renlund, H., Svensson, P. J. & Själander, A. (2017). Bleeding complications and mortality in warfarin-treated VTE patients, dependence of INR variability and iTTR. Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 117(1), 27-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bleeding complications and mortality in warfarin-treated VTE patients, dependence of INR variability and iTTR
2017 (English)In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 27-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High quality of warfarin treatment is important to prevent recurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) without bleeding complications. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of individual time in therapeutic range (iTTR) and International Normalised Ratio (INR) variability on bleeding risk and mortality in a large cohort of well-managed patients with warfarin due to VTE. A cohort of 16612 patients corresponding to 19502 treatment periods with warfarin due to VTE between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2011 was retrieved from the Swedish national quality register AuriculA and matched with the Swedish National Patient Register for bleeding complications and background characteristics and the Cause of death register for occurrence and date of death. The rate of bleeding was 1.79 (confidence interval (CI) 95 % 1.66-1.93) per 100 treatment years among all patients. Those with poor warfarin treatment quality had a higher rate of clinically relevant bleeding, both when measured as iTTR below 70 %, 2.91 (CI 95 % 2.61-3.21) or as INR variability over the mean value 0.85, 2.61 (CI 95 % 2.36-2.86). Among those with both high INR variability and low iTTR the risk of clinically relevant bleeding was clearly increased hazard ratio (HR) 3.47 (CI 95 % 2.89-4.17). A similar result was found for all-cause mortality with a HR of 3.67 (CI 95 % 3.02-4.47). Both a low iTTR and a high INR variability increase the risk of bleeding complications or mortality. When combining the two treatment quality indicators patients at particular high risk of bleeding or death can be identified.

Keywords
TTR, INR variability, venous thromboembolism, bleeding, warfarin, all-cause mortality
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127526 (URN)10.1160/TH16-06-0489 (DOI)000391350600006 ()27652593 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-15 Created: 2016-11-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ilander, M., Olsson-Strömberg, U., Schlums, H., Guilhot, J., Brück, O., Lähteenmäki, H., . . . Mustjoki, S. (2017). Increased proportion of mature NK cells is associated with successful imatinib discontinuation in chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia, 31(5), 1108-1116
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased proportion of mature NK cells is associated with successful imatinib discontinuation in chronic myeloid leukemia
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2017 (English)In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 1108-1116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent studies suggest that a proportion of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in deep molecular remission can discontinue the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment without disease relapse. In this multi-center, prospective clinical trial (EURO-SKI, NCT01596114) we analyzed the function and phenotype of T and NK cells and their relation to successful TKI cessation. Lymphocyte subclasses were measured from 100 imatinib treated patients at baseline and 1 month after the discontinuation, and functional characterization of NK and T cells was done from 45 patients. The proportion of NK cells was associated with the molecular relapse free survival as patients with higher than median NK-cell percentage at the time of drug discontinuation had better probability to stay in remission. Similar association was not found with T or B cells or their subsets. In non-relapsing patients the NK-cell phenotype was mature, whereas patients with more naïve CD56(bright) NK cells had decreased relapse free survival. In addition, the TNF-α/IFN-γ cytokine secretion by NK cells correlated with the successful drug discontinuation. Our results highlight the role of NK cells in sustaining remission and strengthen the status of CML as an immunogenic tumor warranting novel clinical trials with immunomodulating agents.

National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128517 (URN)10.1038/leu.2016.360 (DOI)000400464800009 ()27890936 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-06 Created: 2016-12-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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