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Lundahl, Lisbeth
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Publications (10 of 124) Show all publications
Helms Jørgensen, C., Järvinen, T. & Lundahl, L. (2019). A Nordic transition regime?: Policies for school-to-work transitions in Sweden, Denmark and Finland. European Educational Research Journal (online)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Nordic transition regime?: Policies for school-to-work transitions in Sweden, Denmark and Finland
2019 (English)In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In recent decades, a range of policy measures to support young people’s school-to-work transitions has been initiated across Europe. However, these transition policies have rarely been studied systematically, particularly from a comparative perspective. Thus, the aim of this article is to compare Swedish, Danish and Finnish policies for supporting young people’s educational and school-to-work transitions. Synthesising and analysing recent research, the article critically draws on Walther’s (2006) classification of transition regimes that recognises a Nordic universalistic regime of youth transitions characterised by emphasis on collective social responsibility, individual motivation and personal development. We conclude that significant policy changes have occurred during the last two decades. Coercive measures have been adopted and social support reduced, making young people more individually responsible for the success of their transitions. Hence, current transition policies diverge in many respects from qualities traditionally ascribed to the Nordic transition regime. We also find significant differences between the three countries’ transition policies, which in some cases indicate policy trade-offs. In addition, we conclude that transition policies are generally weakly coordinated across policy domains, which increases the risk of unintended consequences of these policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
School-to-work transitions, transition regimes, comparative research, Nordic countries
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156739 (URN)10.1177/1474904119830037 (DOI)
Projects
Justice through education (JustEd)
Funder
NordForsk
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-05
Rönnberg, L., Lindgren, j. & Lundahl, L. (2019). Education governance in times of marketization: The quiet Swedish revolution. In: R. Langer and T. Brüsemeister (Ed.), Handbuch Educational Governance Theorien: (pp. 711-727). Wiesbaden: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education governance in times of marketization: The quiet Swedish revolution
2019 (English)In: Handbuch Educational Governance Theorien / [ed] R. Langer and T. Brüsemeister, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2019, p. 711-727Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we focus on how education governance can be conceptualized and understood in a context of far-reaching marketization and privatization. We address the challenges and limitations of (political) education governance in times of educational marketization. We argue that the Swedish case is a good starting point for such analytical exploration, since Sweden has experienced quite a far-reaching transformation in this regard, from a strongly centralist and state-led education system to a dispersed, multi-actor and marketized education system, which may be of relevance and importance for additional theorizing in this area. We show that few current political and societal challenges to the dominant policy trajectory exist and that both social democratic and non-socialist governments follow an entrenched policy path, governing largely by preservation and restoration. We argue for the need to critically discuss and unpack the complexities of governing education in a policy context in which market forces have entered, and fundamentally are affecting, education in all policy stages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiesbaden: Springer, 2019
Series
Educational Governance, ISSN 978-3-658-22236-9, E-ISSN 978-3-658-22237-6 ; 43
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154908 (URN)10.1007/978-3-658-22237-6_31 (DOI)978-3-658-22236-9 (ISBN)978-3-658-22237-6 (ISBN)
Projects
HOPESGoing Global
Funder
Academy of FinlandSwedish Research Council, 2018-04897
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-04
Alexiadou, N., Lundahl, L. & Rönnberg, L. (2019). Shifting logics: education and privatisation the Swedish way. In: Jane Wilkinson, Richard Niesche and Scott Eacott (Ed.), Challenges for public education: reconceptualising educational leadership, policy and social justice as resources for hope (pp. 116-131). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shifting logics: education and privatisation the Swedish way
2019 (English)In: Challenges for public education: reconceptualising educational leadership, policy and social justice as resources for hope / [ed] Jane Wilkinson, Richard Niesche and Scott Eacott, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, p. 116-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

During the last 40 years, many countries have launched radical reforms of their public education systems in a neoliberal direction that emphasises a mixed economy of schooling. The reforms have been accompanied by discourses of ‘a crisis’ of the public sector, and shared broadly similar elements of varying degrees of decentralisation and new public management (NPM), choice, competition and the introduction of private actors and interests in public education. Much social policy and education research on marketisation reforms has focused on Anglo-Saxon countries, where institutional changes towards more choice and competition have led to a similar dismantling of the welfare state. This has included turning citizens (students, parents) into customers, with all the resulting implications for ethnically and socio-economically based differentiation (Cahill & Hall, 2014; Campbell et al., 2009; Clarke et al., 2007; Roda & Stuart Wells, 2013). However, despite the numerous similarities in the direction of education reforms, the existing literature on marketisation does not capture the peculiarities of the Nordic education policy settings, where choice and competition coexist with a strong sense of education as a public good.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153785 (URN)9781138348226 (ISBN)9780429791949 (ISBN)9781138348202 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, L., Gruffman-Cruse, E., Malmros, B., Sundbaum, A.-C. & Tieva, Å. (2018). Catching sight of students´ learning: a matter of space?. In: Core meets E-LAW: Innovation in Higher Education. Paper presented at CORE Conference, Hochschule Heidelberg, Germany, November 30 and December 1, 2017. Heidelberg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catching sight of students´ learning: a matter of space?
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2018 (English)In: Core meets E-LAW: Innovation in Higher Education, Heidelberg, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Based on a two-year study of a development project aiming to enhance students ́ learning in a natural science course by making their understanding more visible to themselves and their teachers, this paper analyzes the role of physical space in this context. Data were collected through systematic observations, photo and film documentation, student surveys, interviews with students and teachers, and also from students ́ examination results over an extended period. Previously, the course used traditional teaching methods and spaces. The students found the contents difficult, and the average examination results were poor. The teachers developed more student-active working methods, challenging students to make their understanding visible. However, the course literature and type of examination tasks remained unchanged, allowing for comparisons over time. The instruction took place in a large, innovative "flex-room", equipped with touchscreens, whiteboards, highly accessible technology and flexible furniture, allowing for increased student communication and feedback. The teachers could interact with student groups in the same room, spot and quickly correct misunderstandings in student presentations. The students ́ examination results improved considerably. They argued that the work methods contributed to deeper understanding and improved retention of the course contents. Finally, few observed space-related time-losses occurred. We conclude that well-designed spaces were crucial preconditions to enable these positive results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg: , 2018
Keywords
learning, understanding, space, higher education
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147911 (URN)
Conference
CORE Conference, Hochschule Heidelberg, Germany, November 30 and December 1, 2017
Projects
Rum för lärande
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Lundahl, L., Arnesen, A.-L. & Jónasson, J. T. (2018). Justice and marketization of education in three Nordic countries: Can existing large-scale datasets support comparisons?. Nordic Journal of Studies in Educational Policy, 4(3), 120-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Justice and marketization of education in three Nordic countries: Can existing large-scale datasets support comparisons?
2018 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Studies in Educational Policy, ISSN 2002-0317, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 120-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Traditionally emphasizing justice, equality and inclusion, education policies in the Nordiccountries have incorporated neoliberal features during the last three decades, but to varyingextents. These changes have important, multidimensional implications, but the variationshave been addressed in few comparative Nordic studies. Thus, this article explores thepotential to strengthen comparisons of education regimes in the Nordic countries generally,and social justice and marketization aspects more specifically, by using existing datasets anddatabases. It initially elaborates the concepts of justice and marketization of education. UsingIceland, Norway and Sweden as examples, it explores the relevance, accessibility and comparabilityof some of the larger international and national statistical databases, and hence theirpotential to enable such comparisons. These data are complemented with interviews conductedwith officials at the national agencies of education in the three countries. A mainconclusion is that abundant data are generally available (despite substantial gaps andsilences in the datasets) on various aspects of social justice in education. In contrast, thereis very little data on most aspects of marketization. Comparability is often hindered by factorssuch as differences in definitions, white spots and the organization of education. It isconcluded that there is clearly a need to extend and develop the currently limited Nordiccollaboration in the selection and harmonization of educational statistics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Justice; marketization; largescale datasets; comparisons; compulsory education
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153994 (URN)10.1080/20020317.2018.1542908 (DOI)
Funder
NordForsk
Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, L. & Lindblad, M. (2018). Migrant student achievement and education policy in Sweden. In: Louis Volante, Don Klinger, Ozge Bilgili (Ed.), Immigrant student achievement and education policy: cross-cultural approaches (pp. 69-85). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Migrant student achievement and education policy in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Immigrant student achievement and education policy: cross-cultural approaches / [ed] Louis Volante, Don Klinger, Ozge Bilgili, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 69-85Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As a result of extensive immigration, consisting largely of refugees, Sweden has undergone a fast demographic change during the last 25 years. In 2016, approximately 17% of Sweden’s inhabitants were born outside of the country. Sweden was the country in the European Union granting most refugees asylum in proportion to its population, and the EU country that had most asylum-seeking unaccompanied minors, in absolute numbers. The Swedish education system has had obvious difficulties to cope with the situation, inter alia reflected in considerable gaps in non-immigrant versus immigrant student achievement results and completion rates, which are above average when compared to other Western nations. This chapter provides a brief overview of the cultural composition of the student population within Sweden, including its evolution over time. The trajectory of achievement results on national and international large-scale assessment measures are examined in relation to non-immigrant and immigrant student groups. The authors discuss the range of policy approaches at national and local levels that have been adopted in Sweden to close these achievement gaps and reduce the levels of school dropout and non-completion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
Policy Implications of Research in Education ; 9
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143412 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-74063-8_5 (DOI)978-3-319-74062-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-74063-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-22 Created: 2017-12-22 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Holm, A.-S. & Lundahl, L. (2018). Stimulerande tävlan på gymnasiemarknaden?. In: Magnus Dahlstedt och Andreas Fejes (Ed.), Skolan, marknaden och framtiden: (pp. 51-70). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stimulerande tävlan på gymnasiemarknaden?
2018 (Swedish)In: Skolan, marknaden och framtiden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt och Andreas Fejes, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 51-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143899 (URN)9789144119960 (ISBN)
Projects
Gymnasiet som marknadKonkurrerande och inkluderande. Gymnasieskolan i skärningspunkten mellan social inkludering och marknadisering
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-01-13 Created: 2018-01-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, L., Gruffman-Cruse, E., Malmros, B., Sundbaum, A.-C. & Tieva, Å. (2017). Catching sight of students´ learning – a matter of space?. In: Innovation in Higher Education Learning Spaces: . Paper presented at CORE Conference, Heidelberg 30 November 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catching sight of students´ learning – a matter of space?
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Innovation in Higher Education Learning Spaces, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Based on a two-year study of a development project aiming to enhance students´ learning in a natural science course by making their understanding more visible to themselves and their teachers, the paper analyzes the role of physical space in this context. Data were collected through syste­matic observations, photo and film document­ation, student surveys, interviews with stud­ents and teachers, and also from students´ examination results over an extended period. Previously, the course used traditional teaching methods and spaces. The students found the contents dif­ficult, and the average examination results were poor. The teachers de­velop­ed more student-active work­ingmethods, challenging students to make their under­standing visible. However, the course literature and type of examination tasks remained unchanged, allow­ing for comparisons over time. The instruction took place in a large, innovative “flex-room”, equipped with touchscreens, whiteboards, highly accessible technology and flexible fur­niture, allowing for increased student communication and feedback. The teach­­ers could interact with student groups in the same room,spot and quickly correct misunder­standings in student presen­ta­tions. The students´ examination results improved con­sider­ably. They argued that the work methods contributed to deeper understanding and improved retention of the course contents. Finally, few observed space-related time-losses occurred. We conclude that well-de­signed spaces were crucial preconditions to enable these positive results.

Keywords
learning, understanding, space, higher education
National Category
Social Sciences Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144153 (URN)
Conference
CORE Conference, Heidelberg 30 November 2017
Projects
Rum för Lärande
Available from: 2018-01-23 Created: 2018-01-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Lundahl, L. (2017). Marketization of the urban educational space. In: William T. Pink, George W. Noblit (Ed.), Second international handbook of urban education: (pp. 671-693). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marketization of the urban educational space
2017 (English)In: Second international handbook of urban education / [ed] William T. Pink, George W. Noblit, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 671-693Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Swedish education system has been thoroughly transformed in the last few decades, paralleling wider developments in other OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries. However, in some respects the shift from a uniform, centrally regulated school system to one with far-reaching decentralization and market elements has been more radical and faster than elsewhere. The marketization of education has not been confined to urban areas, but it is most tangible there. This chapter firstly aims to add to our knowledge of how competition affects schools and students; secondly, it looks to critically examine marketization mainly as an urban phenomenon and discuss the consequences for rural areas. The Swedish development is situated in a wider Nordic and historical context and the contours of the new Swedish educational landscape are outlined. Some consequences of the school choice reforms and the resulting market-like situation are highlighted at societal, institutional and individual levels. It is concluded that the school market is far more visible and has a much stronger impact in the big city areas than in less densely populated regions. However, this does not mean that schools and youth in the rural regions are unaffected.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2017
Series
Springer International Handbooks of Education, ISSN 2197-1951
Keywords
School choice, Competition, Market reform
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132613 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-40317-5_36 (DOI)978-3-319-40317-5 (ISBN)978-3-319-40315-1 (ISBN)
Projects
Inkluderande och konkurrerande. Gymnasieskolan i skärningspunkten mellan social inkludering och marknadisering
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-03-19 Created: 2017-03-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, L., Lindblad, M., Lovén, A., Mårald, G. & Svedberg, G. (2017). No particular way to go: careers of young adults lacking upper secondary qualifications. Journal of Education and Work, 30(1), 39-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No particular way to go: careers of young adults lacking upper secondary qualifications
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Education and Work, ISSN 1363-9080, E-ISSN 1469-9435, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 39-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article aims to deepen understanding of the trajectories through school and into adulthood of people who did not attain valued qualifications from upper secondary school ('non-completers'), and explore the fruitfulness of careership theory for such analysis. It is based on interviews with 100 young Swedes: 81 non-completers and 19 who had attended special upper secondary schools catering for young people with mild cognitive disability. Their narratives portray sparse socio-economic resources and difficult family situations, learning problems and marginalisation processes in school. They commonly learned to perceive themselves as failures and 'different'. Framed by narrow horizons of action, these young people's careers were mostly characterised by enforced rather than self-initiated turning points. Often leading to unemployment and economic problems, leaving secondary school was less of a turning point than a continuation of failure, even if completing adult education and getting a job were regarded as self-initiated, positive shifts. We conclude that careership theory was useful for analysing and understanding the careers of the young people concerned. However, distinguishing between 'routines' and 'turning points' became especially difficult when studying lives of these young people hemmed in by sparser resources, fewer choices and less stable career trajectories than their peers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Young adults, school-to-work transitions, Sweden, dropout, careership theory
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113780 (URN)10.1080/13639080.2015.1122179 (DOI)000391127100004 ()
Projects
Osäkra övergångar. Unga utan fullständiggymnasieutbildning: vägarna och åtgärdernai longitudinellt perspektiv
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-5964
Note

First published online 28 Dec 2015.

Available from: 2015-12-30 Created: 2015-12-30 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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