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Gonsalves, A., Silfver, E., Danielsson, A., Ottemo, A. & Berge, M. (2019). "Brunkers and brave heroes": Dominant Subject Positions in Figured Worlds of Construction Engineering. In: : . Paper presented at American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, Toronto, Canada, April 5-9, 2019. All Academic, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Brunkers and brave heroes": Dominant Subject Positions in Figured Worlds of Construction Engineering
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research in engineering education has pointed to the need for new engineers to develop a broader skill-set with an emphasis on 'softer' social skills. However, there remains strong tensions in the identity work that engineers must engage in to balance the technical demands of the discipline with the new emphasis on heterogeneous skills. This study explores how three non-traditional students experience these tensions in the final year of their construction engineering program, across classroom and workplace experiences. We explore the dominant subject positions for students in construction engineering classroom and workplaces in a three-year Swedish engineering program. Results demonstrate that dominant soubject positions for construction engineers can trouble students' identity work as the move across classroom and workplace settings. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
All Academic, Inc., 2019
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158152 (URN)
Conference
American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, Toronto, Canada, April 5-9, 2019
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Gonsalves, A. J., Silfver, E., Danielsson, A. & Berge, M. (2019). "It’s not my dream, actually": students' identity work across figured worlds of construction engineering in Sweden. International Journal of STEM education, 6(13), 1-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"It’s not my dream, actually": students' identity work across figured worlds of construction engineering in Sweden
2019 (English)In: International Journal of STEM education, E-ISSN 2196-7822, Vol. 6, no 13, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Research in engineering education has pointed to the need for new engineers to develop a broader skillsetwith an emphasis on “softer” social skills. However, there remains strong tensions in the identity work that engineersmust engage in to balance the technical demands of the discipline with the new emphasis on heterogeneous skills(Faulkner, Social Studies of Science 37:331–356, 2007). This study explores how three unconventional students experiencethese tensions in the final year of their construction engineering program, and as they move in and out of workplacefield experiences.Results: Using a figured worlds framework (Holland et al., Identity and agency in cultural worlds, 1998), we explore thedominant subject positions for students in construction engineering classroom and workplaces in a 3-year Swedishengineering program. Results demonstrate that dominant subject positions for construction engineers can troublestudents’ identity work as they move across classroom and workplace settings.Conclusions: This study expands our knowledge of the complexity of students’ identity work across classroom andworkplace settings. The emergence of classroom and workplace masculinities that shape the dominant subject positionsavailable to students are shown to trouble the identity work that students engage in as they move across these learningspaces. We examine students’ identity strategies that contribute to their persistence through the field. Finally, we discussimplications for teaching and research in light of students’ movements across these educational contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Engineering, Masculinities, Identity, Heterogeneity
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158184 (URN)10.1186/s40594-019-0165-4 (DOI)000464854700001 ()
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Berge, M. & Kobayashi, S. (2019). Norms in supervision: jokes in life science. In: ESERA 2019: . Paper presented at ESERA 2019, Bologna, Italy, August 26-30, 2019, Bologna, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Norms in supervision: jokes in life science
2019 (English)In: ESERA 2019, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

More research into the disciplinary content and context of doctoral education is needed. The aim of this study is to address this gap by investigating norms in supervision in the specific context of life science. Our approach focuses on the humour in two supervision meetings, looking at who and what is positioned as funny in longer instances of humour. Using an analytical framework inspired by positioning theory, we found that both conceptual knowledge and personal identity were positioned through jokes during supervision meetings. The humour dealt with disciplinary norms on several levels, from ‘Which numbers are aesthetic?’ (Answer: even numbers) to ‘How best to communicate with team members in another country?’ We noticed both positive and negative positionings within the jokes. Humour has several functions: one is to create a relaxed atmosphere; another is to offer criticism in a kind way. Since supervision is also characterised by power distances, it is important that supervisors be aware of the ambiguity of humour.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163219 (URN)
Conference
ESERA 2019, Bologna, Italy, August 26-30, 2019, Bologna, Italy
Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Andrée, M., Arvola-Orlander, A., Berge, M., Caiman, C., Danielsson, A., Grande, V., . . . Sumpter, L. (2019). Social justice in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education: Establishing a platform for conversation. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 2019, 6-8 March Uppsala (pp. 967-971). NERA, Nordic Educational Research Association
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social justice in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education: Establishing a platform for conversation
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NERA, Nordic Educational Research Association, 2019
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157674 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2019, 6-8 March Uppsala
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Berge, M., Danielsson, A. & Lidar, M. (2019). Storylines in the physics teaching content of an upper secondary school classroom. Research in Science & Technological Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Storylines in the physics teaching content of an upper secondary school classroom
2019 (English)In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Physics is often seen as a discipline with difficultcontent, and one that is difficult to identify with. Socialisation processes at the upper secondary school level are of particular interest as these may be linked to the subsequent low and unevenparticipation in university physics. Focusing on how norms are construed in physics classrooms in upper secondary school is therefore relevant.

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify discursive patterns in teacher–student interactions in physics classrooms.

Design and methods: Three different physics lessons with oneclass of students taught by three different teachers in upper secondary school were video-recorded. Positioning theory was used to analyse classroom interaction with a specific focus onhow physics was positioned.

Results: We identified seven different storylines. Four of them (‘reaching a solution to textbook problems’, ‘discussing physics concepts in order to gain better understanding’, ‘doing empiricalenquiry’and‘preparing for the upcoming exam’) represent what teaching physics in an upper secondary school classroom can be. The last three storylines (‘mastering physics’, ‘appreciating physics’ and ‘having a feeling for physics’) all concern how students are supposed to relate to physics and, thus, become ‘insiders’ in thediscipline.

Conclusions: The identification and analysis of storylines raises awareness of the choices teachers make in physics education and their potential consequences for students. For example, inthe storyline of mastering physics a good physics student is associated with ‘smartness’, which might make the classroom a less secure place in general. Variation and diversity in the storylines construed in teaching can potentially contribute to a more inclusive physics education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Physics, discursive patterns, storylines, science identity
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157898 (URN)10.1080/02635143.2019.1593128 (DOI)000464601200001 ()2-s2.0-85063910821 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-06-13
Danielsson, A. T., Gonsalves, A. J., Silfver, E. & Berge, M. (2019). The Pride and Joy of Engineering? The Identity Work of Male Working-Class Engineering Students. Engineering Studies, online: 10 Sep 2019, 1-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Pride and Joy of Engineering? The Identity Work of Male Working-Class Engineering Students
2019 (English)In: Engineering Studies, ISSN 1937-8629, E-ISSN 1940-8374, Vol. online: 10 Sep 2019, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this article, we explore the identity work done by four male,working-class students who participate in a Swedish mechanicalengineering program, with a focus on their participation in projectwork. A focus on how individuals negotiate their participation in scienceand technology disciplines has proven to be a valuable way tostudy inclusion and exclusion in such disciplines. This is of particularrelevance in engineering education where it is widely argued thatchange is needed in order to attract new groups of students andprovide students with knowledge appropriate for the future society.In this study we conceptualized identity as socially and discursivelyproduced, and focus on tracing students’ identity trajectories. Theempirical data consists of ethnographic field notes from lectures,video-recordings of project work, semi-structured interviews, andvideo-diaries recorded by the students. The findings show that eventhough all four students unproblematically associate with the ‘technicist’masculinity of their chosen program it takes considerable workto incorporate the project work into their engineering trajectories.Further, ‘laddish’ masculinities re/produced in higher education inengineering also contribute to a ‘troubled’ identity trajectory for oneof the interviewed students.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Engineering education, gender, identity, mechanical engineering
National Category
Didactics Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163227 (URN)10.1080/19378629.2019.1663859 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-09-20
Danielsson, A., Silfver, E., Gonsalves, A., Ottemo, A. & Berge, M. (2019). Video-diaries in engineering identities research: Some methodological considerations. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 2019, 6-8 March, uppsala. NERA, Nordic Educational Research Association
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Video-diaries in engineering identities research: Some methodological considerations
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NERA, Nordic Educational Research Association, 2019
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157675 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2019, 6-8 March, uppsala
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, A., Silfver, E. & Berge, M. (2018). Engineering Identities: Affordances and Constraints of Different Methods for Exploring Engineering Students’ Identity Work. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2018: Inclusion and Exclusion, Resources for Educational Research?, Bolzano, Italy, September 3-7, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engineering Identities: Affordances and Constraints of Different Methods for Exploring Engineering Students’ Identity Work
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Previous engineering education research concerned with inclusion and exclusion has typically focused on female underrepresentation and the identity work necessary for women in engineering (cf. Tonso 1999, Phipps 2008). This presentation has dual purposes; one empirical and one methodological. The empirical object under investigation is how social class is negotiated in male engineering students’ narratives about ‘educational choice’ and professional trajectories, with a particular focus on how trajectories into, through, and out of engineering educations are constructed. The methodological purpose is to discuss the affordances and constraints of using a small-scale ethnographic approach for exploring students’ identity constitution in the context of engineering education. The empirical data was collected within the bachelor Engineering Mechanics Programme (EMP) and consists of interviews with six engineering students, video-diaries recorded by the interviewed students, ethnographic field-notes from lectures and video-recordings or project work. Engineering educations are currently being transformed, both to attract new groups of students (e.g. women) and to provide the students with broader skill-sets than those traditionally included in engineering educations (e.g. team working skills). The EMP was chosen as it, as educating for a traditional branch of engineering, is likely to incorporate tensions between traditional and contemporary notions of engineering. The ethnographic observations and video-recordings of project work show an enactment of a passion for technology, but also an instrumental approach to the education and the completion of the project (see also, Ottemo 2015). The interviews and video-diaries provide additional means of exploring this passion/instrumental tension in relation to the students’ conceptualisation of engineering education practices, in particular the extent to which they take pride in the completion of the product of their project work. A reoccurring theme in the interviews and video-diaries is also students’ negotiations of tensions between practical and theoretical/analytical aspects of engineering, something that can be interpreted in relation to a doing of social class (Gonsalves et al. 2016). The presentation will discuss further examples of findings, as related to particular methods for data collection and how the data collection methods complement one another.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152311 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2018: Inclusion and Exclusion, Resources for Educational Research?, Bolzano, Italy, September 3-7, 2018
Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Berge, M., Silfver, E. & Danielsson, A. (2018). In search of the new engineer: gender, age, and social class in information about engineering education. European Journal of Engineering Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In search of the new engineer: gender, age, and social class in information about engineering education
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

It is widely argued that engineering education needs to change in order to attract new groups of students and provide students with knowledge appropriate for the future society. In this paper we, therefore, investigate and analyse Swedish universities’ websites, focusing on what characteristics are brought to the fore as important for tomorrow’s engineers. The data consist of text and pictures/photos from nine different Engineering Mechanics programme websites. Using a critical discourse analysis approach, we identify three societal discourses concerning ‘technological progression’, ‘sustainability’, and ‘neoliberal ideals’, evident in the websites. These discourses make certain engineering identities possible, that we have labelled: traditional, contemporary, responsible, and self-made engineer. Our analysis shows that universities’ efforts to diversify students’ participation in engineering education simultaneously reveal stereotypical norms concerning gender and age. We also argue that strong neoliberal notions about the self-made engineer can derail awareness of a gendered, classed, and racialized society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
recruitment, widening participation, norms, discourse analysis, identity positions
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152294 (URN)10.1080/03043797.2018.1523133 (DOI)
Projects
EPIK (VR-UVK)
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-06-04
Danielsson, A. T., Berge, M. & Lidar, M. (2018). Knowledge and power in the technology classroom: a framework for studying teachers and students in action. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 13(1), 163-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge and power in the technology classroom: a framework for studying teachers and students in action
2018 (English)In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 163-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to develop and illustrate an analytical framework for exploring how relations between knowledge and power are constituted in science and technology classrooms. In addition, the empirical purpose of this paper is to explore how disciplinary knowledge and knowledge-making are constituted in teacher–student interactions. In our analysis we focus on how instances of teacher–student interaction can be understood as simultaneously contributing to meaning-making and producing power relations. The analytical framework we have developed makes use of practical epistemological analysis in combination with a Foucauldian conceptualisation of power, assuming that privileging of educational content needs to be understood as integral to the execution of power in the classroom. The empirical data consists of video-recorded teaching episodes, taken from a teaching sequence of three 1-h lessons in one Swedish technology classroom with sixteen 13–14 years old students. In the analysis we have identified how different epistemological moves contribute to the normalisation and exclusion of knowledge as well as ways of knowledge-making. Further, by looking at how the teacher communicates what counts as (ir)relevant knowledge or (ir)relevant ways of acquiring knowledge we are able to describe what kind of technology student is made desirable in the analysed classroom.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Power relations, Secondary science education, Classroom interaction, Pragmatism
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133863 (URN)10.1007/s11422-016-9782-0 (DOI)
Projects
Kunskapens makt: Hur lärare möjliggör elevers deltagande och kunskapande i NO- och teknikklassrum (VR-UVK)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 261404801
Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Projects
Remoulding Engineering: Knowledge and Identity Perspectives on Project Work in Engineering Education [2014-02233_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3614-1692

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