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Jansson, Stina
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Publications (10 of 46) Show all publications
Buss, W., Jansson, S. & Mašek, O. (2019). Unexplored potential of novel biochar-ash composites for use as organo-mineral fertilizers. Journal of Cleaner Production, 208, 960-967
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unexplored potential of novel biochar-ash composites for use as organo-mineral fertilizers
2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 208, p. 960-967Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Application of wood ash on forest and agricultural soils can provide nutrients and increase soil pH, however, it changes the soil chemistry rapidly and temporarily, often resulting in reduced plant growth and potassium leaching. Biochar from woody materials are nutrient poor and need nutrient enhancement prior to soil application. In this study, spruce residues were mixed with spruce/pine ash in different ratios (0–50%) to produce biochar-ash composites at 450 °C. The biochar yield (ash-free basis) increased by 80–90% with the addition of 50% ash due to catalytic biochar formation. Consequently, nearly half the amount of wood is needed to produce the same amount of (ash-free) biochar. Mineral release was moderated in the composites compared to pure ash, demonstrated by a lower electric conductivity and % available K content (a factor of 2.5–4.4 lower than in wood ash). Furthermore, the % available chromium content, which is a key potentially toxic element in wood ash, decreased by a factor of 50–160. Soil application of biochar-ash composites decreases the risk of Cr toxicity, salinity stress and leaching of K in soil substantially compared to ash application. Biochar-ash composites are a novel product with vast unexplored potential for use in forestry and agriculture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Pyrolysis, Potentially toxic element, Potassium, Heavy metal, Forestry, Agriculture
National Category
Environmental Sciences Environmental Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154488 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.10.189 (DOI)000451362200088 ()
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Khaled, A., Richard, C., Redin, L., Niinipuu, M., Janson, S., Jaber, F. & Sleiman, M. (2018). Characterization and Photodegradation of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Car Seat Fabrics from End-of-Life Vehicles. Environmental Science and Technology, 52(3), 1216-1224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization and Photodegradation of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Car Seat Fabrics from End-of-Life Vehicles
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2018 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 1216-1224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we examined the photodegradation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on the surface of car seat covers from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs). Samples were collected at two car dismantling facilities in Sweden and cover car models from 1989 to 1998. The content of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in nine real samples (fabric and polyurethane foam) was first characterized. Fabric samples that did not contain BDE-209 were then spiked with BDE-209 and irradiated in the laboratory and under sunlight. Photoproducts were identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-Orbitrap-MS), whereas volatile products were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Similar photodegradation rates and oxidation products were observed in fabric samples irradiated in the laboratory and those collected from ELVs. Estimated half-life of BDE-209 on fabric inside vehicles ranged from 3 to 6 years. Thirteen major photoproducts were identified as lower brominated products, hydroxylated BDEs, brominated and hydroxylated dibenzofurans (PBDFs) and dioxins (PBDDs). Furthermore, several photoproducts were found to be transferable into water, particularly bromophenols and hydroxylated BDEs, and others into gas phase, such as bromomethanol and 1,2-dibromoethane. This should be taken into consideration for better estimating exposure to PBDEs and to develop strategies for ELV recycling.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145595 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.7b04668 (DOI)000424851700033 ()29261294 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-29 Created: 2018-03-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Edo, M., Ortuño, N., Persson, P.-E., Conesa, J. A. & Jansson, S. (2018). Emissions of toxic pollutants from co-combustion of demolition and construction wood and household waste fuel blends. Chemosphere, 203, 506-513
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emissions of toxic pollutants from co-combustion of demolition and construction wood and household waste fuel blends
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2018 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 203, p. 506-513Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Four different types of fuel blends containing demolition and construction wood and household waste were combusted in a small-scale experimental set-up to study the effect of fuel composition on the emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls (PCBs), chlorobenzenes (PCBzs), chlorophenols (PCPhs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Two woody materials, commercial stemwood (ST) and demolition and construction wood (DC) were selected because of the differences in their persistent organic pollutants (POPs), ash and metals content. For household waste, we used a municipal solid waste (MSW) and a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) from MSW with 5-20 wt% and up to 5 wt% food waste content respectively. No clear effect on the formation of pollutants was observed with different food waste content in the fuel blends tested. Combustion of ST-based fuels was very inefficient which led to high PAH emissions (32 +/- 3.8 mg/kg(fuel)). The use of DC clearly increased the total PCDD and PCDF emissions (71 +/- 26 mu g/kg(fuel)) and had a clear effect on the formation of toxic congeners (210 +/- 87 ng WHO2005-TEQ/kg(fuel)). The high PCDD and PCDF emissions from DC-based fuels can be attributed to the presence of material contaminants such as small pieces of metals or plastics as well as timber treated with chromated copper arsenate preservatives and pentachlorophenol in the DC source. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
POPs, PCDD, RDF, FOOD WASTE, PELLET STOVE
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148712 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.03.203 (DOI)000432235000059 ()29649692 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047426084 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
Weidemann, E., Buss, W., Edo, M., Masek, O. & Jansson, S. (2018). Influence of pyrolysis temperature and production unit on formation of selected PAHs, oxy-PAHs, N-PACs, PCDDs, and PCDFs in biochar-a screening study. Environmental science and pollution research international, 25(4), 3933-3940
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of pyrolysis temperature and production unit on formation of selected PAHs, oxy-PAHs, N-PACs, PCDDs, and PCDFs in biochar-a screening study
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2018 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 3933-3940Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The influence of reactor type and operating conditions of the pyrolysis unit on the final concentration of toxic contaminants in biochar remains unclear. Therefore, we determined the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs), nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compounds (N-PACs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in biochars produced from three different feedstocks (softwood, wheat straw, and anaerobic digestate). Different scaled pyrolysis units (one batch and two continuous units) at two different temperatures (550 and 700 degrees C) were considered. The results revealed that the type of biomass had a significant influence on the PAH, oxy-PAH, and N-PAC content of the biochars. The configuration and type of the pyrolysis unit influenced only the wheat straw pyrolyzed at 550 degrees C. PCDDs and PCDFs occurred at very low levels in the biochars. In terms of PAH, PCDD, and PCDF content, the biochars assessed in this study represent a low risk to the environment, regardless of the temperature and type and size of the pyrolysis unit.

Keywords
Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, Polychlorinated dibenzofuran, Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, Nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compounds
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145603 (URN)10.1007/s11356-017-0612-z (DOI)000425008900087 ()29119490 (PubMedID)
Note

Correction: Weidemann, E., Buss, W., Edo, M. et al. Environ Sci Pollut Res (2018) 25: 3941. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-0804-6

Available from: 2018-03-21 Created: 2018-03-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Abafe, O. A., Späth, J., Fick, J., Jansson, S., Buckley, C., Stark, A., . . . Martincigh, B. S. (2018). LC-MS/MS determination of antiretroviral drugs in influents and effluents from wastewater treatment plants in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Chemosphere, 200, 660-670
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LC-MS/MS determination of antiretroviral drugs in influents and effluents from wastewater treatment plants in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
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2018 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 200, p. 660-670Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

South Africa has the largest occurrence of the human immune deficiency virus (HIV) in the world but has also implemented the largest antiretroviral (ARV) treatment programme. It was therefore of interest to determine the presence and concentrations of commonly used antiretroviral drugs (ARVDs) and, also, to determine the capabilities of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for removing ARVDs. To this end, a surrogate standard based LC-MS/MS method was optimized and applied for the detection of thirteen ARVDs used in the treatment and management of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in two major and one modular WWTP in the eThekwini Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The method was validated and the detection limits fell within the range of 2–20 ng L−1. The analytical recoveries for the ARVDs were mainly greater than 50% with acceptable relative standard deviations. The concentration values ranged from <LOD – 53000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 34000 ng L−1 (effluent) in a decentralized wastewater treatment facility (DEWATS); <LOD – 24000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 33000 ng L−1 (effluent) in Northern WWTP and 61–34000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 20000 ng L−1 (effluent) in Phoenix WWTP. Whilst abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine were almost completely removed from the effluents, atazanavir, efavirenz, lopinavir and nevirapine persisted in the effluents from all three WWTPs. To estimate the ecotoxicological risks associated with the discharge of ARVDs, a countrywide survey focussing on the occurrence of ARVDs in WWTPs, surface and fresh water bodies, and aquatic organisms, is necessary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
HIV-ARVs, ARVDs, LC-MS/MS, Matrix-effect, DEWATS, WWTPs
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147284 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.02.105 (DOI)000429891300075 ()29524887 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-25 Created: 2018-05-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Egan Sjölander, A., Nordlund, A., Fick, J. & Jansson, S. (2018). The multiple meanings of water: wastewater treatment and reuse seen from a communication perspective. In: : . Paper presented at Paper presented at the 7th European Communication Conference (ECREA) Centers and Peripheries: Communication, Research, Translation. October/November, Lugano, Switzerland..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The multiple meanings of water: wastewater treatment and reuse seen from a communication perspective
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152473 (URN)
Conference
Paper presented at the 7th European Communication Conference (ECREA) Centers and Peripheries: Communication, Research, Translation. October/November, Lugano, Switzerland.
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Weidemann, E., Niinipuu, M., Fick, J. & Jansson, S. (2018). Using carbonized low-cost materials for removal of chemicals of environmental concern from water. Environmental science and pollution research international, 25(16), 15793-15801
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using carbonized low-cost materials for removal of chemicals of environmental concern from water
2018 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 25, no 16, p. 15793-15801Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adsorption on low-cost biochars would increase the affordability and availability of water treatment in, for example, developing countries. The aim of this study was to identify the precursor materials and hydrochar surface properties that yield efficient removal of compounds of environmental concern (CEC). We determined the adsorption kinetics of a mixture containing ten CECs (octhilinone, triclosan, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxasole, ciprofloxacin, diclofenac, paracetamol, diphenhydramine, fluconazole, and bisphenol A) to hydrochars prepared from agricultural waste (including tomato- and olive-press wastes, rice husks, and horse manure). The surface characteristics of the hydrochars were evaluated via diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and N2-adsorption. Kinetic adsorption tests revealed that removal efficiencies varied substantially among different materials. Similarly, surface analysis revealed differences among the studied hydrochars and the degree of changes that the materials undergo during carbonization. According to the DRIFTS data, compared with the least efficient adsorbent materials, the most efficient hydrochars underwent more substantial changes during carbonization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Hydrochar, Adsorption, Hydrothermal carbonization, Agro-industrial residues, Organic chemicals, Low-cost adsorbents
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150787 (URN)10.1007/s11356-018-1781-0 (DOI)000434051300046 ()29582326 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Lundin, L. & Jansson, S. (2017). A desktop study on destruction of persistent organic compounds in combustion systems.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A desktop study on destruction of persistent organic compounds in combustion systems
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

On behalf of the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Dr. Lisa Lundin and Dr. Stina Jansson at the Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, has conducted this desktop study. The main aim of this desktop study was to provide a compilation of the current state of knowledge of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), dibenzofurans (PCDF), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDE), hexabromocyclodecane (HBCD), and perfluoroctanesulphonate (PFOS) with regard to their degradation efficiency in advanced solid waste incinerators (ASWI). The objective was also to assess if more support is needed to determinethe degradation efficiency of these compounds in ASWIs.

Publisher
p. 25
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141524 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-07 Created: 2017-11-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Edo Gimenez, M., Skoglund, N., Gao, Q., Persson, P.-E. & Jansson, S. (2017). Fate of metals and emissions of organic pollutants from torrefaction of waste wood, MSW, and RDF. Waste Management, 68, 646-652
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fate of metals and emissions of organic pollutants from torrefaction of waste wood, MSW, and RDF
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2017 (English)In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 68, p. 646-652Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Torrefaction of municipal solid waste (MSW), refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and demolition and construction wood (DC) was performed at 220°C and a residence time of 90 min in a bench-scale reactor. The levels of toxic polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and dibenzofurans (PCDF) contained in emission from the torrefaction process were evaluated. In addition, main ash-forming elements and trace metals in the raw feedstock and char were determined. The use of MSW in fuel blends with DC resulted in lower PCDD and PCDF emissions after torrefaction, compared with the RDF blends. The migration of chlorine from the feedstock to the gas phase reduces the chlorine content of the char which may reduce the risk of alkali chloride-corrosion in char combustion. However, trace metals catalytically active in the formation of PCDD and PCDF remain in the char, thereby may promote PCDD and PCDF formation during subsequent char combustion for energy recovery; this formation is less extensive than when the feedstock is used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Fuel upgrading, PCDD, PCDF, Thermochemical conversion
National Category
Organic Chemistry Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127415 (URN)10.1016/j.wasman.2017.06.017 (DOI)000413126300065 ()28633911 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2016-11-10 Created: 2016-11-10 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved
Gao, Q., Edo, M., Larsson, S. H., Collina, E., Rudolfsson, M., Gallina, M., . . . Jansson, S. (2017). Formation of PCDDs and PCDFs in the torrefaction of biomass with different chemical composition. Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 123, 126-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Formation of PCDDs and PCDFs in the torrefaction of biomass with different chemical composition
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, ISSN 0165-2370, E-ISSN 1873-250X, Vol. 123, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Torrefaction is a thermal pre-treatment technology used to refine biomass, mainly for energy production purposes. However, there is currently a lack of information on the potential formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in the torrefaction process. In this study, torrefaction was conducted using five different types of feedstock: stemwood, bark, wood from a discarded telephone pole, cassava stems and particle board. The feedstock as well as the torrefied biomass (chars) and the volatiles (non-condensable and condensable) generated during torrefaction were analyzed for PCDDs and PCDFs. PCDD concentrations in the torrefaction products were about 2-5 fold of those in the feedstocks. Torrefaction of particle board resulted in extensive formation of PCDDs (7200 ng kg(-1)) compared to the other four feedstocks (13-27 ng kg(-1)). Examination of the homologue profiles suggested that the observed PCDDs in the torrefaction products partly originated from new formation and partly physical transformation from volatilization and re-condensation of PCDDs present in the feedstock. Dechlorination of highly chlorinated compounds (HpCDD and OCDD) in the feedstock to form less chlorinated PCDDs was also observed. Compared to PCDDs, the net formation of PCDFs in the torrefaction process was low, except for the telephone pole sample, for which a dramatic increase (44-fold) of PCDFs was observed. PCDDs and PCDFs were mainly retained in the chars, accounting for 76-96% and 39-74% of the total concentration, respectively. It was also found that the highly chlorinated congeners tended to be retained in the chars, whereas the less chlorinated ones were predominantly volatilized into the gas phase.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2017
Keywords
Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, Polychlorinated dibenzofuran, Persistent organic pollutant, ermochemical conversion, Lignocellulosic biomass
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133480 (URN)10.1016/j.jaap.2016.12.015 (DOI)000394064200015 ()
Available from: 2017-04-11 Created: 2017-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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