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Hadrévi, Jenny
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Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Hadrévi, J., Jonsdottir, I. H., Jansson, P.-A., Eriksson, J. W. & Sjörs, A. (2019). Plasma metabolomic patterns in patients with exhaustion disorder. Stress, 22(1), 17-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma metabolomic patterns in patients with exhaustion disorder
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2019 (English)In: Stress, ISSN 1025-3890, E-ISSN 1607-8888, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exhaustion disorder (ED) is a stress-related disorder that often implies a great burden on the individual patient as well as on society. Previous studies have shown that ED is associated with metabolic deviations, such as lowered fasting glucose. Several mechanisms have been discussed as a plausible explanation of the lack of energy described by these patients. Metabolic processes and reduced ability to mobilize energy have been suggested as important factors. This study investigated metabolomics in 20 patients diagnosed with ED and compared them with 21 healthy controls. Plasma metabolic profiles were examined in both fasting and nonfasting (postprandial) conditions. Blood plasma samples were analyzed for metabolite content using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. A total of 62 different metabolites were simultaneously detected in each of the samples. Multivariate models indicated systematic differences between patients with ED and healthy controls in both their fasting and nonfasting plasma metabolite levels. Lysine and octadecenoic acid were more abundant and glutamine, glycine, serine and gluconic acid were less abundant in the patients across both conditions. In the present study, we comprehensively and simultaneously screen for changes in a large number of metabolites. Our results show a difference in systemic metabolites between patients with exhaustion disorder and healthy controls both in the fasting and in the postprandial states. Here, we present new potential biomarkers mirroring exhaustion disorder metabolism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Clinical burnout, exhaustion disorder, metabolism, metabolomics, biomarkers, stress
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150435 (URN)10.1080/10253890.2018.1494150 (DOI)000463861400003 ()2-s2.0-85052573973 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved
Signoret, C., Ng, E., Da Silva, S., Tack, A., Voss, U., Lidö, H. H., . . . Balachandran, C. (2018). Well-being of early-career researchers: insights from a Swedish survey. Higher Education Policy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Well-being of early-career researchers: insights from a Swedish survey
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2018 (English)In: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Several studies have documented the importance of optimal work situation and the general well-being of early-career researchers (ECRs) for enhancing the academic performance of universities. Yet, most studies focused on specific categories of ECRs, or on specific academic disciplines as well as on specific outcomes. With this study, we recognize the need for a broader sample encompassing different categories of ECRs across academic disciplines. In a national survey of Swedish universities, the National Junior Faculty of Sweden (NJF) collected data from ECRs in order to study the influence of work situation and well-being on perceived scientific environment. We observed that work situation and well-being are interdependent and jointly influence each other in shaping the conditions for ideal scientific environment. Importantly, we employ structural equation model (SEM) analysis to account for the endogenous relationship between work situation and personal well-being in predicting perceived scientific environment. Results from SEM indicate that support from the university, work time management, job clarity, contract length and quality of life satisfaction were related to the perceived possibility of conducting the best science. Our research also highlighted individual differences across demographic factors and contract length in the perceived work situation and the possibility of conducting the best science.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
early-career researchers, survey, academia, well-being, work situation, Sweden
National Category
Learning
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144739 (URN)10.1057/s41307-018-0080-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hadrévi, J., Søgaard, K. & Reffstrup Christensen, J. (2017). Dietary Fiber Intake among Normal-Weight and Overweight Female Health Care Workers: An Exploratory Nested Case-Control Study within FINALE-Health. Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, Article ID 1096015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary Fiber Intake among Normal-Weight and Overweight Female Health Care Workers: An Exploratory Nested Case-Control Study within FINALE-Health
2017 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 2090-0724, E-ISSN 2090-0732, article id 1096015Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Socioeconomic factors affect choice of diet, that is, dietary fiber intake. Underreporting of food consumption in diet surveys has been reported higher in low-income, low-education groups compared to high-income, high-education groups. This paper examines in a socioeconomic homogenous low-income low-education group of females the relation between dietary fiber intake and overweight and scrutinizes if the level of underreporting is equally large in normal-weight and overweight groups. Thirty-four female health care workers classified as either normal-weight () or obese () based on BMI, fat percentage, and waist circumference participated. A detailed food-diary was used to record their dietary intake in 9 days. Average dietary fiber intake in the normal-weight group was 2.73 +/− 0.65 g/MJ, while it was 2.15 +/− 0.64 g/MJ for the women in the obese group. In both groups, the overall food intake was underreported. In spite of a significantly lower dietary fiber intake in the obese group, the present population of women working within health care all showed an overall low dietary fiber intake and a general underreporting of food intake. These results indicate a clear need for dietary advice especially on fiber intake to increase general health and decrease weight.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141848 (URN)10.1155/2017/1096015 (DOI)000415086900001 ()
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Xin, D. L., Hadrevi, J., Elliott, M. E., Amin, M., Harris, M. Y., Barr-Gillespie, A. & Barbe, M. F. (2017). Effectiveness of conservative interventions for sickness and pain behaviors induced by a high repetition high force upper extremity task. BMC neuroscience (Online), 18, Article ID 36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of conservative interventions for sickness and pain behaviors induced by a high repetition high force upper extremity task
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2017 (English)In: BMC neuroscience (Online), ISSN 1471-2202, E-ISSN 1471-2202, Vol. 18, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Systemic inflammation is known to induce sickness behaviors, including decreased social interaction and pain. We have reported increased serum inflammatory cytokines in a rat model of repetitive strain injury (rats perform an upper extremity reaching task for prolonged periods). Here, we sought to determine if sickness behaviors are induced in this model and the effectiveness of conservative treatments.

Methods: Experimental rats underwent initial training to learn a high force reaching task (10 min/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks), with or without ibuprofen treatment (TRHF vs. TRHF + IBU rats). Subsets of trained animals went on to perform a high repetition high force (HRHF) task for 6 or 12 weeks (2 h/day, 3 days/week) without treatment, or received two secondary interventions: ibuprofen (HRHF + IBU) or a move to a lower demand low repetition low force task (HRHF-to-LRLF), beginning in task week 5. Mixed-effects models with repeated measures assays were used to assay duration of social interaction, aggression, forepaw withdrawal thresholds and reach performance abilities. One-way and two-way ANOVAs were used to assay tissue responses. Corrections for multiple comparisons were made.

Results: TRHF + IBU rats did not develop behavioral declines or systemic increases in IL-1beta and IL-6, observed in untreated TRHF rats. Untreated HRHF rats showed social interaction declines, difficulties performing the operant task and forepaw mechanical allodynia. Untreated HRHF rats also had increased serum levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, neuroinflammatory responses (e.g., increased TNFalpha) in the brain, median nerve and spinal cord, and Substance P and neurokinin 1 immunoexpression in the spinal cord. HRHF + IBU and HRHF-to-LRLF rats showed improved social interaction and reduced inflammatory serum, nerve and brain changes. However, neither secondary treatment rescued HRHF-task induced forepaw allodynia, or completely attenuated task performance declines or spinal cord responses.

Conclusions: These results suggest that inflammatory mechanisms induced by prolonged performance of high physical demand tasks mediate the development of social interaction declines and aggression. However, persistent spinal cord sensitization was associated with persistent behavioral indices of discomfort, despite use of conservative secondary interventions indicating the need for prevention or more effective interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Repetitive loading, Work-related musculoskeletal disorders, Upper extremity, Social interaction, Aggression, Mechanical hypersensitivity, Von Frey, Inflammation, Cytokines
National Category
Neurosciences Social and Clinical Pharmacy Other Basic Medicine
Research subject
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133047 (URN)10.1186/s12868-017-0354-3 (DOI)000397717400001 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-1259
Available from: 2017-03-29 Created: 2017-03-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Reffstrup Christensen, J., Viskum Gjelstrup Bredahl, T., Hadrévi, J., Sjøgaard, G. & Søgaard, K. (2016). Background, design and conceptual model of the cluster randomized multiple-component workplace study: FRamed Intervention to Decrease Occupational Muscle pain - "FRIDOM". BMC Public Health, 16, Article ID 1116.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Background, design and conceptual model of the cluster randomized multiple-component workplace study: FRamed Intervention to Decrease Occupational Muscle pain - "FRIDOM"
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2016 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 1116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Several RCT studies have aimed to reduce either musculoskeletal disorders, sickness presenteeism, sickness absenteeism or a combination of these among females with high physical work demands. These studies have provided evidence that workplace health promotion (WHP) interventions are effective, but long-term effects are still uncertain. These studies either lack to succeed in maintaining intervention effects or lack to document if effects are maintained past a one-year period. This paper describes the background, design and conceptual model of the FRIDOM (FRamed Intervention to Decrease Occupational Muscle pain) WHP program among health care workers. A job group characterized by having high physical work demands, musculoskeletal disorders, high sickness presenteeism - and absenteeism.

METHODS:

FRIDOM aimed to reduce neck and shoulder pain. Secondary aims were to decrease sickness presenteeism, sickness absenteeism and lifestyle-diseases such as other musculoskeletal disorders as well as metabolic-, and cardiovascular disorders - and to maintain participation to regular physical exercise training, after a one year intervention period. The entire concept was tailored to a population of female health care workers. This was done through a multi-component intervention including 1) intelligent physical exercise training (IPET), dietary advice and weight loss (DAW) and cognitive behavioural training (CBT).

DISCUSSION:

The FRIDOM program has the potential to provide evidence-based knowledge of the pain reducing effect of a multi component WHP among a female group of employees with a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and in a long term perspective evaluate the effects on sickness presenteeism and absenteeism as well as risk of life-style diseases.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

NCT02843269 , 06.27.2016 - retrospectively registered.

Keywords
Cognitive behavioral training, Diet, Exercise, Health promotion, Implementation, Maintained effect, RCT, Sickness absenteeism, Sickness presenteeism, Worksite
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Rehabilitation Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128180 (URN)10.1186/s12889-016-3758-6 (DOI)000385965900003 ()
Available from: 2016-11-28 Created: 2016-11-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hadrevi, J., Turkina, M. V., Carlsson, A., Gerdle, B., Larsson, B., Hellström, F. & Ghafouri, B. (2016). Myosin light chain and calcium regulating protein differences in chronic musculoskeletal neck and shoulder pain. Journal of Integrated Omnics, 6(1), 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Myosin light chain and calcium regulating protein differences in chronic musculoskeletal neck and shoulder pain
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Integrated Omnics, ISSN 2182-0287, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Proteomic screening analysis has detected myosin light chain (MLC) as a protein implied to be involved in chronic musculoskeletal neck and shoulder pain. Several analyses of MLC proteins have stated a difference in phosphorylation being the determining factor for protein activation hence altered contrability of the muscle in i.e. senescence. In continuation of a previous publication, this study is an attempt to analyze the different MLC isoforms by mass spectrometry and immune-analyses in myalgic and healthy trapezius muscle. In the present study no differences in phosphorylation level between the corresponding individual proteins were detected using LC-MSMS and immunoblotting; instead we assigned different isoforms of regulatory MLCs. To further elucidate the contrability: calcium (Ca2+) regulatory proteins, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 1 (SERCA-1) and calsequestrine (CSQ) were analyzed by western blot. The analysis revealed a significantly increased abundance of SERCA-1 protein in the myalgic muscle and a significantly increased abundance of CSQ in healthy muscle. Myalgic muscle contraction patterns have in previous studies shown to differ from healthy muscle which may be connected to the Ca2+ availability in the muscle. Here we present the proteomic characterization of differences in Ca2+ regulating proteins and particularly regulatory MLCs in trapezius muscle of women with chronic musculoskeletal neck and shoulder pain.

Keywords
calcium, masspektrometry, phosphorylation, muscle pain, myosin light chain, trapezius
National Category
Other Medical Biotechnology
Research subject
Biochemistry; Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114519 (URN)10.5584/jiomics.v6i1.191 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-1259
Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Barbe, M., Xin, D., Hadrevi, J., Elliott, M. & Barr-Gillespie, A. (2016). Sickness behaviors (reduced social interaction and pain behaviors) are linked to inflammatory mechanisms in a rat model of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 60(1), 975-979
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sickness behaviors (reduced social interaction and pain behaviors) are linked to inflammatory mechanisms in a rat model of work-related musculoskeletal disorders
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, ISSN 1541-9312, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 975-979Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We sought to determine if sickness behaviors (decreased social interaction and pain) are induced in a rat model of work-related overuse and effectiveness of anti-inflammatory treatments. Rats first trained to learn a high force reaching task (15 min/week day for 6 wks), with subsets treated prophylactically with ibuprofen or anti-TNFalpha. Others performed a high repetition high force (HRHF) task for 6 or 12 weeks (2 hrs/day, 3 days/wk) untreated, or with ibuprofen, anti-TNFalpha or rest treatments beginning task week 5. Untreated HRHF rats had increased IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNFalpha in serum and brain, increased Substance P in spinal cord, decreased social interaction and increased forepaw allodynia. Secondary antiinflammatory treatments attenuated social interaction and brain changes, but not allodynia or spinal cord changes; rest provided partial attenuation. Prophylactic treatments prevented all changes. Thus, inflammatory mechanisms mediate the development of sickness behaviors induced by work-related overuse, but not maintenance of allodynia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
behaviour, inflammation
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Research subject
didactics of educational measurement; Biochemistry; Biopharmaceutics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130360 (URN)10.1177/1541931213601225 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-01-18 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nordström, A., Hadrévi, J., Olsson, T., Franks, P. W. & Nordström, P. (2016). The Higher Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in Men Than in Women is Associated with Differences in Visceral Fat Mass. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 101(10), 3740-3746
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Higher Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in Men Than in Women is Associated with Differences in Visceral Fat Mass
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 101, no 10, p. 3740-3746Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: We have previously found that visceral fat is a stronger predictor for cardiovascular risk factors than body mass index (BMI). Objective: To investigate the prevalence of diabetes in elderly men and women in relation to objectively assessed visceral fat volume. Design and settings: The cohort consisted of a population-based sample of 705 men and 688 women, all aged 70 years at the time of examination. Main outcome measures: Associations between body fat estimates, plasma glucose level and diabetes prevalence were investigated using multivariable-adjusted statistical models.Results:Theprevalence of type2 diabetes was 14.6% in men and 9.1% inwomen (p0.001). Mean BMI was slightly higher in men than in women (27. 3 vs. 26.6 kg/m2, p 0.01), with a greater difference in mean visceral fat mass (1987 vs. 1087 g, p 0.001). After adjustment for physical activity and smoking, men had about twice the odds of having type 2 diabetes compared with women (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.38–2.76). The inclusion of BMI in this model did not change the risk associated with male sex (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.34–2.77). However, when visceral fat was included as a covariate, male sex was not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.51–1.18).Conclusions: The higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in older men than in older women was associated with larger amount of visceral fat in men. In contrast, differences in BMI was not associated with this difference.

National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125956 (URN)10.1210/jc.2016-1915 (DOI)000390849800029 ()27490920 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-23 Created: 2016-09-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hadrevi, J., Bjorklund, M., Kosek, E., Hallgren, S., Antti, H., Fahlstrom, M. & Hellstrom, F. (2015). Systemic differences in serum metabolome: a cross sectional comparison of women with localised and widespread pain and controls. Scientific Reports, 5, Article ID 15925.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systemic differences in serum metabolome: a cross sectional comparison of women with localised and widespread pain and controls
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2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 15925Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic musculoskeletal pain exists either as localised to a single region or as widespread to multiple sites in several quadrants of the body. Prospective studies indicate that widespread pain could act as a far end of a continuum of musculoskeletal pain that started with chronic localised pain. The mechanism by which the transition from localised pain to widespread occurs is not clear, although many studies suggest it to be an altered metabolism. In this study, systemic metabolic differences between women with chronic localised neck-shoulder pain (NP), women with chronic widespread pain (CWP) and women who were healthy (CON) were assessed. Blood samples were analysed taking a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The metabolomics analysis showed a clear systematic difference in the metabolic profiles between the subjects with NP and the CON but only a weak systematic difference between the subjects with CWP and the CON. This most likely reflects a difference in the portion of the metabolome influenced by the two pain conditions. In the NP group, the overall metabolic profile suggests that processes related to energy utilisation and lipid metabolism could be central aspects of mechanisms maintaining disorder.

National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111753 (URN)10.1038/srep15925 (DOI)000363874800001 ()26522699 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-25 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hadrevi, J. (2014). Ca 2+ regulatory proteins of muscle contraction: a possible marker of chronic muscle myalgia. In: : . Paper presented at IASP World Congress on pain Buenos Aires Argentina.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ca 2+ regulatory proteins of muscle contraction: a possible marker of chronic muscle myalgia
2014 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Aim of Investigation

Work related illnesses are one of the main reasons for sick-leave in the western world. One of the most common is pain and discomfort in the neck-shoulder region affecting the trapezius muscle, trapezius myalgia (TM). Patients suffering from work related chronic trapezius myalgia experience muscle stiffness, weakness and tension. The biochemical mechanisms behind these sensations are not yet known. Recent proteomic screening results indicate an increased abundance of the calcium regulatory fast myosin light chains in myalgic muscle suggesting an altered contractibility in the myalgic trapezius. To characterize a general increase of Ca2+ in the myalgic muscle the expression level of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, (SERCA-1) was analyzed. The aim of this study was to compare the level of Ca2+ regulated proteins in cleaners with trapezius myalgia (TM) and cleaners without trapezius myalgia (CON) and to verify a possible difference in phosphorylation of the contractile regulatory myosin light chains.

Methods

Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to separate proteins of interest. The proteomic correlation pattern of the myosin light chain proteins and the differences between healthy and myalgic muscle were investigated using a multivariate Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). Phosphorylations of the fast regulatory myosin light chains were analyzed using serine and tyrosin antibodies. The characterization of myosin isoforms was performed using advanced Orbitrap LC-MS/MS. The expression level of SERCA-1 was analyzed in muscle biopsies from 11 professional cleaners with TM and 11 CON using Simple western size assay (Peggy, Protein simple, CA, US)

Results

The detected systematic differences between myosin light chain proteins showed according to the PLS-DA analysis that the fast regulatory light chains were generally more abundant in the MYA group. Ten protein spots were identified as different myosin light chains isoforms according to the amino acid sequencing. Phosphorylated serine was detected in 6 of the isoforms, though there were no differences in amount of phosphorylation between spots. The expression level of Serca-1 was significantly (p = 0.017) higher in TM subjects compared to the CON.

Conclusions

There is a higher abundance of fast contracting calcium regulatory myosin light chains in muscle experiencing chronic myalgia. This increased abundance of the regulatory fast myosin light chains supports the previously presented results showing an altered contractibility of the myalgic trapezius muscle. Our results show no difference in phosphorylation between the different spots contradictory to previously published results; suggesting phosphorylation of the protein being the reason for the separation of spots on the two dimensional gels. Instead our results show the spots to have different amino acid sequences. The actual function of the detected myosin light chain proteins remains to be elucidated. The increased abundance of fast contracting regulatory light chains together with the significantly increased abundance of Serca-1 proteins in the MYA muscle supports a higher abundance of Ca2+ in the myalgic muscle. The increased abundance of Serca-1 might be an indication of an adaptation due to peripheral sensitization or increased neuronal signaling altering the contrability of the muscle.       

 

Acknowledgments

Supported by Postdoctoral Grant from Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (Forte) 2013-1259 and Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS-159031,LIO-35923, SC-2013-00395-36).

 

 

 

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-98893 (URN)
Conference
IASP World Congress on pain Buenos Aires Argentina
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-1259
Available from: 2015-01-27 Created: 2015-01-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07
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