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Byskov, J., Maluka, S. A., Marchal, B., Shayo, E. H., Blystad, A., Bukachi, S., . . . Bloch, P. (2019). A systems perspective on the importance of global health strategy developments for accomplishing today’s Sustainable Development Goals. Health Policy and Planning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systems perspective on the importance of global health strategy developments for accomplishing today’s Sustainable Development Goals
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2019 (English)In: Health Policy and Planning, ISSN 0268-1080, E-ISSN 1460-2237Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Priority setting within health systems has not led to accountable, fair and sustainable solutions to improving population health. Providers, users and other stakeholders each have their own health and service priorities based on selected evidence, own values, expertise and preferences. Based on a historical account, this article analyses if contemporary health systems are appropriate to optimize population health within the framework of cross cutting targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We applied a scoping review approach to identify and review literature of scientific databases and other programmatic web and library-based documents on historical and contemporary health systems policies and strategies at the global level. Early literature supported the 1977 launching of the global target of Health for All by the year 2000. Reviewed literature was used to provide a historical overview of systems components of global health strategies through describing the conceptualizations of health determinants, user involvement and mechanisms of priority setting over time, and analysing the importance of historical developments on barriers and opportunities to accomplish the SDGs. Definitions, scope and application of health systems-associated priority setting fluctuated and main health determinants and user influence on global health systems and priority setting remained limited. In exploring reasons for the identified lack of SDG-associated health systems and priority setting processes, we discuss issues of accountability, vested interests, ethics and democratic legitimacy as conditional for future sustainability of population health. To accomplish the SDGs health systems must engage beyond their own sector boundary. New approaches to Health in All Policies and One Health may be conducive for scaling up more democratic and inclusive priority setting processes based on proper process guidelines from successful pilots. Sustainable development depends on population preferences supported by technical and managerial expertise.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Accountability, democracy, determinants, developing countries, ethics, health systems, organizational change, outcomes, participation, priority setting
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162434 (URN)10.1093/heapol/czz042 (DOI)31363736 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-08-26
Gaitonde, R., Muraleedharan, V. R., San Sebastian, M. & Hurtig, A.-K. (2019). Accountability in the health system of Tamil Nadu, India: exploring its multiple meanings. Health Research Policy and Systems, 17, Article ID 44.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accountability in the health system of Tamil Nadu, India: exploring its multiple meanings
2019 (English)In: Health Research Policy and Systems, ISSN 1478-4505, E-ISSN 1478-4505, Vol. 17, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Accountability is increasingly being demanded of public services and is a core aspect of most recent frameworks of health system strengthening. Community-based accountability is an increasingly used strategy, and wasa core aspect of India's flagship National Rural Health Mission (NRHM; 2005-2014). Research on policy implementation has called for policy analysts to go beyond the superficial articulation of a particular policy intervention to study the underlying meaning this has for policy-makers and other actors of the implementation process and to the way in which problems sought to be addressed by the policy have been identified and problematised'.

Methods: This research, focused on state level officials and health NGO leaders, explores the meanings attached to the concept of accountability among a number of key actors during the implementation of the NRHM in the south Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The overall research was guided by an interpretive approach to policy analysis and the problematisation lens. Through in-depth interviews we draw on the interviewees' perspectives on accountability.

Results: The research identifies three distinct perspectives on accountability among the key actors involved in the implementation of the NRHM. One perspective views accountability as the achievement of pre-set targets, the other as efficiency in achieving these targets, and the final one as a transformative process that equalises power differentials between communities and the public health system. We also present the ways in which these differences in perspectives are associated with different programme designs.

Conclusions: This research underlines the importance of going beyond the statements of policy to exploring the underlying beliefs and perspectives in order to more comprehensively understand the dynamics of policy implementation; it further points to the impacts of these perspectives on the design of initiatives in response to the policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
Accountability, Community-based accountability, National Rural Health Mission, Belief structures, problematisation, Policy implementation
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159067 (URN)10.1186/s12961-019-0448-8 (DOI)000466190800001 ()31029173 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Maquibar, A., Estalella, I., Vives-Cases, C., Hurtig, A.-K. & Goicolea, I. (2019). Analysing training in gender-based violence for undergraduate nursing students in Spain: A mixed-methods study. Nurse Education Today, 77, 71-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysing training in gender-based violence for undergraduate nursing students in Spain: A mixed-methods study
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2019 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 77, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Health-care professionals, and nurses especially among them, play an essential role in the health sector's response to gender-based violence. To be able to successfully address this major public health issue they need specific training in the topic.

Objective: To analyse training on gender-based violence that nursing students receive at universities in Spain.

Design: Mixed-methods approach.

Setting: Spain.

Methods: Systematic review of public documents followed by in-depth interviews with university lecturers.

Results: Eighty per cent (92/115) of nursing training programmes included content regarding gender-based violence. There was great variability in the topics included in the training. Health consequences due to gender based violence exposure and the role of the health sector in addressing these health consequences were the most frequently included topics. Ethical issues and legislation were the least frequent ones, as these were only dealt with in one and 18 training programmes, respectively. In the qualitative analysis of the interviews, two categories were identified: 'Supportive legislation and supportive lecturers are essential for integrating gender-based violence training' and 'Approach to gender-based violence shapes the contents and the subject in which it is incorporated'. The first category refers to the main drivers for training integration, while the second category refers to how lecturers' perceptions influenced the way in which training was implemented.

Conclusions: As many as 80% of the nursing education programmes included specific training in gender-based violence, although with great variability in the contents among the universities. For this study's participants, enacted legislation, and lecturers interested in the topic and in decision-making positions were key drivers for this extensive implementation. The variability observed across universities might be explained by lecturers' different approaches to gender-based violence and the nursing profession.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Intimate partner violence, Nursing students, Curricula, Mixed methods
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159588 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2019.01.017 (DOI)000467510200012 ()30999062 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Rusanganwa, V., Gahutu, J. B., Evander, M. & Hurtig, A.-K. (2019). Clinical Referral Laboratory Personnel’s Perception of Challenges and Strategies for Sustaining the Laboratory Quality Management System: A Qualitative Study in Rwanda. American Journal of Clinical Pathology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical Referral Laboratory Personnel’s Perception of Challenges and Strategies for Sustaining the Laboratory Quality Management System: A Qualitative Study in Rwanda
2019 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, ISSN 0002-9173, E-ISSN 1943-7722Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To explore challenges explaining the decrease in quality performance and suggest strategies to improve and sustain laboratory quality services.

Methods: Twenty key informants’ interviews from laboratory personnel were conducted in five laboratories. Four had previously shown a decrease in quality performance. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using inductive thematic analysis.

Results: Two themes emerged: (1) insufficient coordination and follow-up system towards accreditation, where lack of coordination, follow-up, and audits explained the decrease in performance; (2) inadequate resource optimization, where insufficient knowledge in Laboratory Quality Management System (LQMS), ownership by laboratory workforce, and insufficient stakeholders’ communication contributed to low-quality performance.

Conclusions: The coordination, follow-up, and assessments of LQMS, in conjunction with training of laboratory workforce, would establish an institutional culture of continuous quality improvement (CQI) towards accreditation and sustainment of quality health care. To achieve CQI culture, routine gap checking and planning for improvement using a system approach is required.

Keywords
Continuous improvement, Laboratory quality management system (LQMS), Quality performance, Rwanda
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162435 (URN)10.1093/ajcp/aqz092 (DOI)31304959 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-08-26
Sirili, N., Frumence, G., Kiwara, A., Mwangu, M., Goicolea, I. & Hurtig, A.-K. (2019). "Doctors ready to be posted are jobless on the street…" the deployment process and shortage of doctors in Tanzania.. Human Resources for Health, 17(1), Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Doctors ready to be posted are jobless on the street…" the deployment process and shortage of doctors in Tanzania.
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2019 (English)In: Human Resources for Health, ISSN 1478-4491, E-ISSN 1478-4491, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization advocates that health workforce development is a continuum of three stages of entry, available workforce and exit. However, many studies have focused on addressing the shortage of numbers and the retention of doctors in rural and remote areas. The latter has left the contribution of the entry stage in particularly the deployment process on the shortage of health workforce less understood. This study therefore explored the experiences of medical doctors (MDs) on the deployment process after the internship period in Tanzania's health sector.

METHODS: A qualitative case study that adopted chain referral sampling was used to conduct 20 key informant interviews with MDs who graduated between 2003 and 2009 from two Medical Universities in Tanzania between February and April 2016. These MDs were working in hospitals at different levels and Medical Universities in eight regions and five geo-political zones in the country. Information gathered was analysed using a qualitative content analysis approach.

RESULTS: Experiences on the deployment process fall into three categories. First, "uncertainties around the first appointment" attributed to lack of effective strategies for identification of the pool of available MDs, indecision and limited vacancies for employment in the public sector and private sector and non-transparent and lengthy bureaucratic procedures in offering government employment. Second, "failure to respect individuals' preferences of work location" which were based on the influence of family ties, fear of the unknown rural environment among urbanized MDs and concern for career prospects. Third, "feelings of insecurity about being placed at a regional and district level" partly due to local government authorities being unprepared to receive and accommodate MDs and territorial protectionism among assistant medical officers.

CONCLUSIONS: Experiences of MDs on the deployment process in Tanzania reveal many challenges that need to be addressed for the deployment to contribute better in availability of equitably distributed health workforce in the country. Short-term, mid-term and long-term strategies are needed to address these challenges. These strategies should focus on linking of the internship with the first appointment, work place preferences, defining and supporting career paths to health workers working under the local government authorities, improving the working relationships and team building at the work places and fostering rural attachment to medical students during medical training.

Keywords
Africa, Deployment, Employment of doctors, Health sector, Health workforce, Internship, Physicians, Rural areas, Shortage of doctors, Tanzania
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158185 (URN)10.1186/s12960-019-0346-8 (DOI)000457484100001 ()30709401 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060945358 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Zulu, J. M., Kinsman, J., Hurtig, A.-K., Michelo, C., George, A. & Schneider, H. (2019). Integrating community health assistant-driven sexual and reproductive health services in the community health system in Nyimba district in Zambia: mapping key actors, points of integration, and conditions shaping the process. Reproductive Health, 16(1), Article ID 122.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating community health assistant-driven sexual and reproductive health services in the community health system in Nyimba district in Zambia: mapping key actors, points of integration, and conditions shaping the process
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2019 (English)In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Although large scale public sector community health worker programs have been key in providing sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in low- and middle-income countries, their integration process into community health systems is not well understood. This study aimed to identify the conditions and strategies through which Community Health Assistants (CHAs) gained entry and acceptability into community health systems to provide SRH services to youth in Zambia. The country's CHA program was launched in 2010.

Methodology: A phenomenological design was conducted in Nyimba district. All nine CHAs deployed in Nyimba district were interviewed in-depth on their experiences of navigating the introduction of SRH services for youth in community settings, and the data obtained analyzed thematically.

Results: In delivering SRH services targeting youth, CHAs worked with a range of community actors, including other health workers, safe motherhood action groups, community health workers, neighborhood health committees, teachers, as well as political, traditional and religious leaders. CHAs delivered SRH education and services in health facilities, schools, police stations, home settings, and community spaces. They used their health facility service delivery role to gain trust and entry into the community, and they also worked to build relationships with other community level actors by holding regular joint meetings, and acting as brokers between the volunteer health workers and the Ministry of Health. CHAs used their existing social networks to deliver SRH services to adolescents. By embedding the provision of information about SRH into general life skills at community level, the topic's sensitivity was reduced and its acceptability was enhanced. Further, support from community leaders towards CHA-driven services promoted the legitimacy of providing SRH for youth. Factors limiting the acceptability of CHA services included the taboo of discussing sexuality issues, a gender discriminatory environment, competition with other providers, and challenges in conducting household visits.

Conclusion: Strengthening CHAs' ability to negotiate and navigate and gain acceptability in the community health system as they deliver SRH, requires support from both the formal health system and community networks. Limitations to the acceptability of CHA-driven SRH services are a product of challenges both in the community and in the formal health system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Community health assistants, Community health system, Sexual and reproductive health services
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162431 (URN)10.1186/s12978-019-0788-4 (DOI)000480717500002 ()31409362 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070755686 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Eid, D., San Sebastian, M., Hurtig, A.-K. & Goicolea, I. (2019). Leishmaniasis patients' pilgrimage to access health care in rural Bolivia: a qualitative study using human rights to health approach. BMC International Health and Human Rights, 19(1), Article ID 12.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leishmaniasis patients' pilgrimage to access health care in rural Bolivia: a qualitative study using human rights to health approach
2019 (English)In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, ISSN 1472-698X, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease endemic in Bolivia that disproportionately affects people with little social and political capital. Although the treatment is provided free of charge by the Bolivian government, there is an under-utilization of treatments in relation to the estimated affected population. This study explores the experiences of patients with leishmaniasis and the challenges faced when searching for diagnosis and treatment in Bolivia using a human rights approach.

Methods: We conducted open-ended interviews with 14 participants diagnosed with leishmaniasis. The qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis and were interpreted under a human rights approach to health care.

Results: Four themes emerged during data analysis: (1) the decision for seeking a cure takes time; (2) the severity of symptoms and disruption of functioning drives the search for Western medicine; (3) the therapeutic journey between Western and traditional medicine; and (4) accessibility barriers to receive adequate medical treatment. This study showed that access to health care limitations were the most important factors that prevented patients from receiving timely diagnosis and treatment. Cultural factors played a secondary role in their decision to seek medical care.

Conclusions: Accessibility barriers resulted in a large pilgrimage between public health care and traditional medicinal treatments for patients with leishmaniasis. This pilgrimage and the related costs are important factors that determine the decision to seek health care. This study contributes to the understanding of the under-utilisation problems of medical services in leishmaniasis and other similar diseases in remote and poor populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Cutaneous leishmaniasis, human rights, health care, seeking behavior, Bolivia
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156786 (URN)10.1186/s12914-019-0196-4 (DOI)000460652900002 ()30837001 (PubMedID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, 75000554
Available from: 2019-02-28 Created: 2019-02-28 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
Hernandez, A., Lorena Ruano, A., Hurtig, A.-K., Goicolea, I., San Sebastian, M. & Flores, W. (2019). Pathways to accountability in rural Guatemala: a qualitative comparative analysis of citizen-led initiatives for the right to health of indigenous populations. World Development, 113, 392-401
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pathways to accountability in rural Guatemala: a qualitative comparative analysis of citizen-led initiatives for the right to health of indigenous populations
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2019 (English)In: World Development, ISSN 0305-750X, E-ISSN 1873-5991, Vol. 113, p. 392-401Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Strengthening citizen-led accountability initiatives is a critical rights-based strategy for improving health services for indigenous and other marginalized populations. As these initiatives have gained prominence in health and other sectors, there is great interest in how they operate and what makes them effective. Scholarly focus is shifting from measuring the efficacy of their tools and tactics to deepening understanding of the context-sensitive pathways through which change occurs. This paper examines how citizen-led initiatives' actions to strengthen grassroots networks, monitor health services and engage with authorities interact with local sociopolitical conditions and contribute to accountability achievements for indigenous populations in rural Guatemala. We used qualitative comparative analysis to first systematize and score structured qualitative monitoring data gathered in 29 municipal-level initiatives, and then analyze patterns in the presence of different forms of citizen action, contextual conditions and accountability outcomes across cases. Our study identifies pathways of collective action through which citizen-led initiatives bolster their power to engage and negotiate with authorities and bring about solutions to some of the health system deficiencies that they face. While constructive engagement is widely advocated as the most effective approach to interaction with authorities, our study indicates that success depends on wider processes of community mobilization. To overcome the power asymmetries that marginalized groups face when engaging with authorities, iterative processes of network building and participatory monitoring as well as persistence in their demands are critical. These processes further provide an enabling environment for moving beyond the local and projecting indigenous voices to engage with authorities at higher governance levels. Initiatives also applied adversarial legal action as an alternative engagement strategy that contributed to bolster citizen power. Our findings indicate the potential of collective power generated by the actions of citizen-led initiatives to enable marginalized populations to hold authorities accountable for health system failures. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Accountability, Health system, Indigenous peoples, Qualitative comparative analysis, Guatemala
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153629 (URN)10.1016/j.worlddev.2018.09.020 (DOI)000449310800029 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-05898
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Sirili, N., Frumence, G., Kiwara, A., Mwangu, M., Goicolea, I. & Hurtig, A.-K. (2019). Public private partnership in training of doctors after the 1990s' health sector reforms: the case of Tanzania. Human Resources for Health, 17, Article ID 33.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public private partnership in training of doctors after the 1990s' health sector reforms: the case of Tanzania
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2019 (English)In: Human Resources for Health, ISSN 1478-4491, E-ISSN 1478-4491, Vol. 17, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Similar to many other low- and middle-income countries, public private partnership (PPP) in the training of the health workforce has been emphasized since the launch of the 1990s’ health sector reforms in Tanzania. PPP in training aims to contribute to addressing the critical shortage of health workforce in these countries. This study aimed to analyse the policy process and experienced outcomes of PPP for the training of doctors in Tanzania two decades after the 1990s’ health sector reforms. We reviewed documents and interviewed key informants to collect data from training institutions and umbrella organizations that train and employ doctors in both the public and private sectors. We adopted a hybrid thematic approach to analyse the data while guided by the policy analysis framework by Gagnon and Labonté. PPP in training has contributed significantly to the increasing number of graduating doctors in Tanzania. In tandem, undermining of universities’ autonomy and the massive enrolment of medical students unfavourably affect the quality of graduating doctors. Although PPP has proven successful in increasing the number of doctors graduating, unemployment of the graduates and lack of database to inform the training needs and capacity to absorb the graduates have left the country with a health workforce shortage and maldistribution at service delivery points, just as before the introduction of the PPP. This study recommends that Tanzania revisit its PPP approach to ensure the health workforce crisis is addressed in its totality. A comprehensive plan is needed to address issues of training within the framework of PPP by engaging all stakeholders in training and deployment starting from the planning of the number of medical students, and when and how they will be trained while taking into account the quality of the training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
: Health sector reforms, Training of doctors, Policy analysis, Public private partnership, Tanzania, Health workforce shortage
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150635 (URN)10.1186/s12960-019-0372-6 (DOI)000468753800002 ()31118038 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Ragnarsson, S., Myléus, A., Hurtig, A.-K., Sjöberg, G., Rosvall, P.-Å. & Petersen, S. (2019). Recurrent Pain and Academic Achievement in School-Aged Children: A Systematic Review. Journal of School Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recurrent Pain and Academic Achievement in School-Aged Children: A Systematic Review
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2019 (English)In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364Article, review/survey (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Recurrent pain and school failures are common problems in children visiting the school nurses office. The overall aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between recurrent pain and academic achievement in school-aged children. Literature was searched in seven electronic databases and in relevant bibliographies. Study selection, data extraction, and study and evidence quality assessments were performed systematically with standardized tools. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria and 13 verified an association between recurrent pain (headache, stomachache, and musculoskeletal pain) and negative academic achievement. Two longitudinal studies indicated a likely causal effect of pain on academic achievement. All studies had substantial methodological drawbacks and the overall quality of the evidence for the identified associations was low. Thus, children’s lack of success in school may be partly attributed to recurrent pain problems. However, more highquality studies are needed, including on the direction of the association and its moderators and mediators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
recurrent pain, school-aged children, school failure, school nursing
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157030 (URN)10.1177/1059840519828057 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-06 Created: 2019-03-06 Last updated: 2019-04-03
Projects
Community-based interventions for strengthening adolescent sexual reproductive health and rights: how can they be integrated and sustained? A multiple case study from Zambia [2016-05830_VR]; Umeå UniversityStrengthening community-based health systems through e-health innovations? a realist evaluation of Virtual Health Rooms in northern Sweden [2017-00183_Forte]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7087-1467

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