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Idahl, Annika
Publications (10 of 59) Show all publications
Cramer, D. W., Fichorova, R. N., Terry, K. L., Yamamoto, H., Vitonis, A. F., Ardanaz, E., . . . Kaaks, R. (2018). Anti-CA15.3 and Anti-CA125 Antibodies and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Results from the EPIC Cohort. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 27(7), 790-804
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-CA15.3 and Anti-CA125 Antibodies and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Results from the EPIC Cohort
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2018 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 790-804Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Neoplastic and non-neoplastic events may raise levels of mucins, CA15.3, and CA125, and generate antibodies against them, but their impact on epithelial ovarian cancer (FOC) risk has not been fully defined.

Methods: CA15.3, CA125, and IgC1 antibodies against them were measured in 806 women who developed FAN; and 1,927 matched controls from the European Prospective Investigation of Nutrition and Cancer. Associations between epidemiologic factors and anti-mucin antibodies were evaluated using generalized linear models; EOC risks associated with anti-mucin antibodies, by themselves or in combination with respective antigens, were evaluated using conditional logistic regression.

Results: In controls, lower antibodies against both mucins were associated with current smoking; and, in postmenopausal women, higher levels with longer oral contraceptive use and later-age-at and shorter-interval-since last birth. Lower antiCA15.3 antibodies were associated with higher body mass and, in premenopausal women, more ovulatory cycles. Higher anti-CA15.3 and anti-CA In antibodies were associated with higher risk for mutinous IOC occurring >= 3 years from enrollment. Long-term risk for serous EOC was reduced in women with low CA125 and high anti-CA125 antibodies relative to women with low concentrations of both.

Conclusions: We found general support for the hypothesis that anti-mucin antibody levels correlate with risk factors for EOC Antibodies alone or in combinations with their antigen may predict longer term risk of specific EOC types.

Impact: Anti-CA125 and anti-CA15.3 antibodies alone or in perspective of antigens may be informative in the pathogenesis of EOC subtypes, but less useful for informing risk for all EOC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2018
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150744 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-17-0744 (DOI)000437461100010 ()29661801 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049634585 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Jung, S., Allen, N., Arslan, A. A., Baglietto, L., Barricarte, A., Brinton, L. A., . . . Dorgan, J. F. (2018). Anti‐Müllerian hormone and risk of ovarian cancer in nine cohorts. International Journal of Cancer, 142(2), 262-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti‐Müllerian hormone and risk of ovarian cancer in nine cohorts
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 2, p. 262-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Animal and experimental data suggest that anti‐Müllerian hormone (AMH) serves as a marker of ovarian reserve and inhibits the growth of ovarian tumors. However, few epidemiologic studies have examined the association between AMH and ovarian cancer risk. We conducted a nested case‐control study of 302 ovarian cancer cases and 336 matched controls from nine cohorts. Prediagnostic blood samples of premenopausal women were assayed for AMH using a picoAMH enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable‐adjusted conditional logistic regression. AMH concentration was not associated with overall ovarian cancer risk. The multivariable‐adjusted OR (95% CI), comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of AMH, was 0.99 (0.59–1.67) (Ptrend: 0.91). The association did not differ by age at blood draw or oral contraceptive use (all Pheterogeneity: ≥0.26). There also was no evidence for heterogeneity of risk for tumors defined by histologic developmental pathway, stage, and grade, and by age at diagnosis and time between blood draw and diagnosis (all Pheterogeneity: ≥0.39). In conclusion, this analysis of mostly late premenopausal women from nine cohorts does not support the hypothesized inverse association between prediagnostic circulating levels of AMH and risk of ovarian cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
anti-Müllerian hormone, ovarian cancer, epidemiology, ovarian function
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151194 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31058 (DOI)000415898500005 ()28921520 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, S., Oda, H., Lundin, E., Olsson, J. & Idahl, A. (2018). Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydial Heat Shock Protein 60 and Anti-Chlamydial Antibodies in Women with Epithelial Ovarian Tumors. Translational Oncology, 11(2), 546-551
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydial Heat Shock Protein 60 and Anti-Chlamydial Antibodies in Women with Epithelial Ovarian Tumors
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2018 (English)In: Translational Oncology, ISSN 1944-7124, E-ISSN 1936-5233, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 546-551Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) infection has been suggested to promote epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) development. This study sought to explore the presence of C. trachomatis DNA and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (chsp60) in ovarian tissue, as well as anti-chlamydial IgG antibodies in plasma, in relation to subtypes of EOC. METHODS: This cross-sectional cohort consisted of 69 women who underwent surgery due to suspected ovarian pathology. Ovarian tissue and corresponding blood samples were collected at the time of diagnosis. In ovarian tumor tissue, p53, p16, Ki67 and chsp60 were analyzed immunohistochemically, and PCR was used to detect C. trachomatis DNA. Plasma C. trachomatis IgG and cHSP60 IgG were analyzed with a commercial MIF-test and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: Eight out of 69 women had C. trachomatis DNA in their ovarian tissue, all were invasive ovarian cancer cases (16.7% of invasive EOC). The prevalence of the chsp60 protein, C. trachomatis IgG and cHSP60 IgG in HGSC, compared to other ovarian tumors, was 56.0% vs. 37.2% P = .13, 15.4% vs. 9.3% P = .46 and 63.6% vs. 45.5% P = .33 respectively. None of the markers of C. trachomatis infection were associated with p53, p16 or Ki67. CONCLUSIONS: C. trachomatis was detected in invasive ovarian cancer, supporting a possible role in carcinogenesis of EOC. However, there were no statistically significant associations of chsp60 in ovarian tissue, or plasma anti-chlamydial IgG antibodies, with any of the subtypes of ovarian tumors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148647 (URN)10.1016/j.tranon.2018.02.008 (DOI)000428690100041 ()29524832 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045732126 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Fortner, R. T., Schock, H., Le Cornet, C., Hüsing, A., Vitonis, A. F., Johnson, T. S., . . . Kaaks, R. (2018). Ovarian cancer early detection by circulating CA125 in the context of anti-CA125 autoantibody levels: Results from the EPIC cohort. International Journal of Cancer, 142(7), 1355-1360
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ovarian cancer early detection by circulating CA125 in the context of anti-CA125 autoantibody levels: Results from the EPIC cohort
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 7, p. 1355-1360Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

CA125 is the best ovarian cancer early detection marker to date; however, sensitivity is limited and complementary markers are required to improve discrimination between ovarian cancer cases and non-cases. Anti-CA125 autoantibodies are observed in circulation. Our objective was to evaluate whether these antibodies (1) can serve as early detection markers, providing evidence of an immune response to a developing tumor, and (2) modify the discriminatory capacity of CA125 by either masking CA125 levels (resulting in lower discrimination) or acting synergistically to improve discrimination between cases and non-cases. We investigated these objectives using a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort (EPIC) including 250 cases diagnosed within 4 years of blood collection and up to four matched controls. Circulating CA125 antigen and antibody levels were quantified using an electrochemiluminescence assay. Adjusted areas under the curve (aAUCs) by 2-year lag-time intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression calibrated toward the absolute risk estimates from a pre-existing epidemiological risk model as an offset-variable. Anti-CA125 levels alone did not discriminate cases from controls. For cases diagnosed <2 years after blood collection, discrimination by CA125 antigen was suggestively higher with higher anti-CA125 levels (aAUC, highest antibody tertile: 0.84 [0.76-0.92]; lowest tertile: 0.76 [0.67-0.86]; p(het)=0.06). We provide the first evidence of potentially synergistic discrimination effects of CA125 and anti-CA125 antibodies in ovarian early detection. If these findings are replicated, evaluating CA125 in the context of its antibody may improve ovarian cancer early detection. What's new? Although CA125, a mucin produced in epithelial cells, is a known marker for ovarian cancer, complementary biomarkers are necessary for reliable early cancer detection. Here, the authors examined autoantibodies against CA125 as potential pre-diagnosis markers. Although anti-CA125 levels did not discriminate between ovarian cases and controls, discrimination of CA125 differed by levels of its antibody, with the highest discrimination among women with the highest antibody levels. The authors propose that CA125 and anti-CA125 may act synergistically for ovarian cancer early detection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
ovarian cancer, early detection markers, CA125, anti-CA125 antibodies, MUC16, autoantibodies
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145129 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31164 (DOI)000424635000008 ()29159934 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-05 Created: 2018-03-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Idahl, A., Hermansson, A. & Lalos, A. (2018). Social support and ovarian cancer incidence: a Swedish prospective population-based study. Gynecologic Oncology, 149(2), 324-328
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social support and ovarian cancer incidence: a Swedish prospective population-based study
2018 (English)In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, E-ISSN 1095-6859, Vol. 149, no 2, p. 324-328Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Low social support is associated with worse prognosis for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. However, few studies have explored the relation between low social support and incidence of EOC. The aim of this prospective nested case-control study was to examine whether self-perceived low social support was associated with the incidence of EOC.

Methods: The Swedish Cancer Registry was used to identify participants in the Vasterbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) comprising 58,000 women, who later developed EOC. Each case was matched to four cancer free controls. The VIP uses the Social Support questionnaire, a modified version of the validated questionnaire "The Interview Schedule for Social Interaction" (ISSI) measuring quantitative (AVSI) and qualitative (AVAT) aspects of social support.

Results: The risk of EOC in relation to AVSI and AVAT was similar between the 239 cases and the 941 controls after adjustment for educational level, smoking, BMI, Cambridge Physical Activity Index and age (aOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.72-1.01 and aOR 0.54, 95% CI 0.16-1.81). Lagtime was found to have no impact. A decreased risk of serous ovarian cancer was seen in women with fewer persons available for informal socializing (aOR 0.75, 95% CI 0.59-0.95). Adjusted analyses showed non-significant odds ratios below 1.0 in the vast majority of histotypes.

Conclusions: A general trend towards a decreased risk of ovarian cancer associated with low AVSI and AVAT was identified. Solely the serous subtype was significantly associated with low scores of AVSI. Prospective pathophysiological and epidemiological studies regarding social support are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
ovarian cancer, serous ovarian cancer, social support, social integration, attachment, The Interview Schedule for Social Interaction
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-149032 (URN)10.1016/j.ygyno.2018.03.042 (DOI)000432645000017 ()29555331 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85043997202 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Kaaks, R., Fortner, R. T., Hüsing, A., Barrdahl, M., Hopper, M., Johnson, T., . . . Anderson, K. S. (2018). Tumor-associated autoantibodies as early detection markers for ovarian cancer?: A prospective evaluation. International Journal of Cancer, 143(3), 515-526
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tumor-associated autoantibodies as early detection markers for ovarian cancer?: A prospective evaluation
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 3, p. 515-526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immuno-proteomic screening has identified several tumor-associated autoantibodies (AAb) that may have diagnostic capacity for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, with AAbs to P53 proteins and cancer-testis antigens (CTAGs) as prominent examples. However, the early detection potential of these AAbs has been insufficiently explored in prospective studies. We performed ELISA measurements of AAbs to CTAG1A, CTAG2, P53 and NUDT11 proteins, for 194 patients with ovarian cancer and 705 matched controls from the European EPIC cohort, using serum samples collected up to 36 months prior to diagnosis under usual care. CA125 was measured using electrochemo-luminiscence. Diagnostic discrimination statistics were calculated by strata of lead-time between blood collection and diagnosis. With lead times 6 months, ovarian cancer detection sensitivity at 0.98 specificity (SE98) varied from 0.19 [95% CI 0.08-0.40] for CTAG1A, CTAG2 and NUDT1 to 0.23 [0.10-0.44] for P53 (0.33 [0.11-0.68] for high-grade serous tumors). However, at longer lead-times, the ability of these AAb markers to distinguish future ovarian cancer cases from controls declined rapidly; at lead times >1 year, SE98 estimates were close to zero (all invasive cases, range: 0.01-0.11). Compared to CA125 alone, combined logistic regression scores of AAbs and CA125 did not improve detection sensitivity at equal level of specificity. The added value of these selected AAbs as markers for ovarian cancer beyond CA125 for early detection is therefore limited. What's new? Could autoantibodies against tumor antigens provide an early warning system for ovarian cancer? These authors tested how well certain antibodies detected ovarian cancer. They selected four candidate antibodies, to p53, CTAG1A, CTAG2 and NUDT11 proteins, which appear in elevated levels in cancer patients. None of them performed well as a herald of burgeoning cancer. They did not perform any better than the best currently available biomarker, CA125, and as lead times increased past 6 months prediagnosis, the effectiveness diminished. Surprisingly, elevated antibodies appeared in quite a few of the control samples, suggesting they might not be as cancer-specific as expected.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
early detection, antibodies, prospective validation
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150665 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31335 (DOI)000436110100008 ()29473162 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85043348365 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Ose, J., Poole, E. M., Schock, H., Lehtinen, M., Arslan, A. A., Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A., . . . Fortner, R. T. (2017). Androgens Are Differentially Associated with Ovarian Cancer Subtypes in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cancer Research, 77(14), 3951-3960
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Androgens Are Differentially Associated with Ovarian Cancer Subtypes in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium
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2017 (English)In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 77, no 14, p. 3951-3960Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. The etiology of EOC remains elusive; however, experimental and epidemiologic data suggest a role for hormone-related exposures in ovarian carcinogenesis and risk factor differences by histologic phenotypes and developmental pathways. Research on prediagnosis androgen concentrations and EOC risk has yielded inconclusive results, and analyses incorporating EOC subtypes are sparse. We conducted a pooled analysis of 7 nested case–control studies in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium to investigate the association between pre-diagnosis circulating androgens [testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS)], sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and EOC risk by tumor characteristics (i.e., histology, grade, and stage). The final study population included 1,331 EOC cases and 3,017 matched controls. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to assess risk associations in pooled individual data. Testosterone was positively associated with EOC risk (all subtypes combined, ORlog2 = 1.12; 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.24); other endogenous androgens and SHBG were not associated with overall risk. Higher concentrations of testosterone and androstenedione associated with an increased risk in endometrioid and mucinous tumors [e.g., testosterone, endometrioid tumors, ORlog2 = 1.40 (1.03–1.91)], but not serous or clear cell. An inverse association was observed between androstenedione and high grade serous tumors [ORlog2 = 0.76 (0.60–0.96)]. Our analyses provide further evidence for a role of hormone-related pathways in EOC risk, with differences in associations between androgens and histologic subtypes of EOC.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138036 (URN)10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-3322 (DOI)000405677500022 ()
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Fortner, R. T., Schock, H., Jung, S., Allen, N. E., Arslan, A. A., Brinton, L. A., . . . Dorgan, J. F. (2017). Anti-Mullerian hormone and endometrial cancer: a multi-cohort study. British Journal of Cancer, 117(9), 1412-1418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-Mullerian hormone and endometrial cancer: a multi-cohort study
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2017 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 117, no 9, p. 1412-1418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Mullerian ducts are the embryological precursors of the female reproductive tract, including the uterus; anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) has a key role in the regulation of foetal sexual differentiation. Anti-Mullerian hormone inhibits endometrial tumour growth in experimental models by stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. To date, there are no prospective epidemiologic data on circulating AMH and endometrial cancer risk. Methods: We investigated this association among women premenopausal at blood collection in a multicohort study including participants from eight studies located in the United States, Europe, and China. We identified 329 endometrial cancer cases and 339 matched controls. AntiMullerian hormone concentrations in blood were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) across tertiles and for a doubling of AMH concentrations (ORlog2). Subgroup analyses were performed by ages at blood donation and diagnosis, oral contraceptive use, and tumour characteristics. Results: Anti-Mullerian hormone was not associated with the risk of endometrial cancer overall (ORlog(2): 1.07 (0.99-1.17)), or with any of the examined subgroups. Conclusions: Although experimental models implicate AMH in endometrial cancer growth inhibition, our findings do not support a role for circulating AMH in the aetiology of endometrial cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017
Keywords
endometrial cancer, anti-Mullerian hormone, Mullerian inhibiting substance, multicohort study
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141826 (URN)10.1038/bjc.2017.299 (DOI)000413527300019 ()28873086 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Fortner, R. T., Vitonis, A. F., Schock, H., Huesing, A., Johnson, T., Fichorova, R. N., . . . Terry, K. L. (2017). Correlates of circulating ovarian cancer early detection markers and their contribution to discrimination of early detection models: results from the EPIC cohort. Journal of Ovarian Research, 10, Article ID 20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlates of circulating ovarian cancer early detection markers and their contribution to discrimination of early detection models: results from the EPIC cohort
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Ovarian Research, ISSN 1757-2215, E-ISSN 1757-2215, Vol. 10, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Ovarian cancer early detection markers CA125, CA15.3, HE4, and CA72.4 vary between healthy women, limiting their utility for screening.

Methods: We evaluated cross-sectional relationships between lifestyle and reproductive factors and these markers among controls (n = 1910) from a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Improvements in discrimination of prediction models adjusting for correlates of the markers were evaluated among postmenopausal women in the nested case-control study (n = 590 cases). Generalized linear models were used to calculate geometric means of CA125, CA15.3, and HE4. CA72.4 above vs. below limit of detection was evaluated using logistic regression. Early detection prediction was modeled using conditional logistic regression.

Results: CA125 concentrations were lower, and CA15.3 higher, in post- vs. premenopausal women (p ≤ 0.02). Among postmenopausal women, CA125 was higher among women with higher parity and older age at menopause (ptrend ≤ 0.02), but lower among women reporting oophorectomy, hysterectomy, ever use of estrogen-only hormone therapy, or current smoking (p < 0.01). CA15.3 concentrations were higher among heavier women and in former smokers (p ≤ 0.03). HE4 was higher with older age at blood collection and in current smokers, and inversely associated with OC use duration, parity, and older age at menopause (≤ 0.02). No associations were observed with CA72.4. Adjusting for correlates of the markers in prediction models did not improve the discrimination.

Conclusions: This study provides insights into sources of variation in ovarian cancer early detection markers in healthy women and informs about the utility of individualizing marker cutpoints based on epidemiologic factors.

Keywords
Ovarian cancer, Early detection markers, CA125, CA15.3, HE4
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133752 (URN)10.1186/s13048-017-0315-6 (DOI)000396771200001 ()28320479 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-05 Created: 2017-05-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Jung, S., Allen, N., Arslan, A. A., Baglietto, L., Brinton, L. A., Egleston, B. L., . . . Dorgan, J. F. (2017). Demographic, lifestyle, and other factors in relation to antimullerian hormone levels in mostly late premenopausal women. Fertility and Sterility, 107(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Demographic, lifestyle, and other factors in relation to antimullerian hormone levels in mostly late premenopausal women
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2017 (English)In: Fertility and Sterility, ISSN 0015-0282, E-ISSN 1556-5653, Vol. 107, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To identify reproductive, lifestyle, hormonal, and other correlates of circulating antimullerian hormone (AMH) concentrations in mostly late premenopausal women. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Not applicable. Patient(s): A total of 671 premenopausal women not known to have cancer. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Concentrations of AMH were measured in a single laboratory using the picoAMH ELISA. Multivariable-adjusted median (and interquartile range) AMH concentrations were calculated using quantile regression for several potential correlates. Result(s): Older women had significantly lower AMH concentrations (>= 40 [n = 444] vs. < 35 years [n = 64], multivariable-adjusted median 0.73 ng/mL vs. 2.52 ng/mL). Concentrations of AMH were also significantly lower among women with earlier age at menarche (< 12 [n = 96] vs. >= 14 years [n = 200]: 0.90 ng/mL vs. 1.12 ng/mL) and among current users of oral contraceptives (n = 27) compared with never or former users (n = 468) (0.36 ng/mL vs. 1.15 ng/mL). Race, body mass index, education, height, smoking status, parity, and menstrual cycle phase were not significantly associated with AMH concentrations. There were no significant associations between AMH concentrations and androgen or sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations or with factors related to blood collection (e.g., sample type, time, season, and year of blood collection). Conclusion(s): Among premenopausal women, lower AMH concentrations are associated with older age, a younger age at menarche, and currently using oral contraceptives, suggesting these factors are related to a lower number or decreased secretory activity of ovarian follicles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2017
Keywords
Antimullerian hormone, demographic, lifestyle, ovarian reserve, reproductive factors
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136212 (URN)10.1016/j.fertnstert.2017.02.105 (DOI)000400459100032 ()28366409 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-29 Created: 2017-06-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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