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Treleaven, J., Takasaki, H. & Grip, H. (2019). Altered trunk head co-ordination in those with persistent neck pain. Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 39, 45-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered trunk head co-ordination in those with persistent neck pain
2019 (English)In: Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, ISSN 2468-7812, Vol. 39, p. 45-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Decreased neck motion and sensorimotor deficits have been identified in those with neck pain. It is thought that these might be related to altered reflex mechanisms between the neck, eyes and the vestibular system. Trunk, head co-ordination might also be altered in neck pain.

Objectives: This study investigated trunk head co-ordination ability in subjects with neck pain compared to asymptomatic controls.

Method: Twenty-four subjects with persistent neck pain and twenty-six age and gender matched healthy controls performed 3 trials of 3 trunk movements whilst trying to keep the head still - (1) alternate trunk movement to the left and right (2) trunk movement to the left (3) trunk movement to the right. Wireless motion sensors positioned over the sternum and the forehead measured trunk and head range and velocity of motion.

Analysis: ANOVA was used to compare trunk and head range and velocity of motion during the 3 tasks.

Results: Neck pain subjects had significantly less trunk movement (p < 0.05) and velocity (p = < 0.02) as well as significantly increased head movement (p = < 0.03) during most tasks compared to control subjects.

Discussion: The results of the study suggest that neck pain subjects have difficulty moving their trunk independently of their head. They are less able to keep the head still while moving the trunk and perform the tasks more slowly. These findings might be related to altered reflex activity of the cervico-collic reflex and sensorimotor control. Further research is required.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Trunk, Head motion, Neck pain, Sensorimotor, Cervico-collic reflex
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156301 (URN)10.1016/j.msksp.2018.11.010 (DOI)000456572900010 ()30476827 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-02-21Bibliographically approved
Grip, H., Nilsson, K. G., Häger, C. G., Lundström, R. & Öhberg, F. (2019). Does the Femoral Head Size in Hip Arthroplasty Influence Lower Body Movements during Squats, Gait and Stair Walking?: A Clinical Pilot Study Based on Wearable Motion Sensors. Sensors, 19(14), Article ID 3240.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does the Femoral Head Size in Hip Arthroplasty Influence Lower Body Movements during Squats, Gait and Stair Walking?: A Clinical Pilot Study Based on Wearable Motion Sensors
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2019 (English)In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 14, article id 3240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A hip prosthesis design with larger femoral head size may improve functional outcomes compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA) design. Our aim was to compare the range of motion (RoM) in lower body joints during squats, gait and stair walking using a wearable movement analysis system based on inertial measurement units (IMUs) in three age-matched male groups: 6 males with a conventional THA (THAC), 9 with a large femoral head (LFH) design, and 8 hip- and knee-asymptomatic controls (CTRL). We hypothesized that the LFH design would allow a greater hip RoM, providing movement patterns more like CTRL, and a larger side difference in hip RoM in THAC when compared to LFH and controls. IMUs were attached to the pelvis, thighs and shanks during five trials of squats, gait, and stair ascending/descending performed at self-selected speed. THAC and LFH participants completed the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS). The results showed a larger hip RoM during squats in LFH compared to THAC. Side differences in LFH and THAC groups (operated vs. non-operated side) indicated that movement function was not fully recovered in either group, further corroborated by non-maximal mean HOOS scores (LFH: 83 +/- 13, THAC: 84 +/- 19 groups, vs. normal function 100). The IMU system may have the potential to enhance clinical movement evaluations as an adjunct to clinical scales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
MEMS, gyroscopes, accelerometers, total hip arthroplasty, movement analysis
National Category
Orthopaedics Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162882 (URN)10.3390/s19143240 (DOI)000479160300207 ()31340548 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Markström, J., Grip, H., Schelin, L. & Häger, C. K. (2019). Dynamic knee control and movement strategies in athletes and non‐athletes in side hops: implications for knee injury. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 29(8), 1181-1189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic knee control and movement strategies in athletes and non‐athletes in side hops: implications for knee injury
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 1181-1189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Athletes exposed to rapid maneuvers need a high level of dynamic knee stability and robustness, while also controlling whole body movement, to decrease the risk of non‐contact knee injury. The effects of high‐level athletic training on such measures of movement control have not, however, been thoroughly evaluated. This study investigated whether elite athletes (who regularly perform knee‐specific neuromuscular training) show greater dynamic knee robustness and/or different movement strategies than non‐athletic controls, in relation to overall knee function. Thirty‐nine women (19 athletes, 20 controls) performed standardized rebound side hops (SRSH) while a motion capture system synchronized with two force plates registered three‐dimensional trunk, hip, and knee joint angles and moments. Dynamic knee robustness was evaluated using finite helical axis (FHA) inclination angles extracted from knee rotation intervals of 10°, analyzed with independent t tests. Angle and moment curves were analyzed with inferential methods for functional data. Athletes had superior knee function (less laxity, greater hop performances, and strength) but presented similar FHA inclination angles to controls. Movement strategies during the landing phase differed; athletes presented larger (a) hip flexion angles (during 9%‐29% of the phase), (b) hip adduction moments (59%‐99%), (c) hip internal rotation moments (83%‐89%), and (d) knee flexion moments (79%‐93%). Thus, elite athletes may have a greater ability than non‐athletes to keep the knee robust while performing SRSH more efficiently through increased engagement of the hip. However, dynamic knee robustness associated with lower FHA inclination angles still show room for improvement, thus possibly decreasing knee injury risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
biomechanics, injury prevention, kinematics, kinetics, sports
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159135 (URN)10.1111/sms.13432 (DOI)000475431400013 ()30972848 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068897729 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Grip, H., Tengman, E., Liebermann, D. G. & Häger, C. (2019). Kinematic analyses including finite helical axes of drop jump landings demonstrate decreased knee control long after anterior cruciate ligament injury. PLoS ONE, 14(10), Article ID e0224261.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinematic analyses including finite helical axes of drop jump landings demonstrate decreased knee control long after anterior cruciate ligament injury
2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 10, article id e0224261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose was to evaluate the dynamic knee control during a drop jump test following injury of the anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACL) using finite helical axes. Persons injured 17-28 years ago, treated with either physiotherapy (ACLPT, n = 23) or reconstruction and physiotherapy (ACLR, n = 28) and asymptomatic controls (CTRL, n = 22) performed a drop jump test, while kinematics were registered by motion capture. We analysed the Preparation phase (from maximal knee extension during flight until 50 ms post-touchdown) followed by an Action phase (until maximal knee flexion post-touchdown). Range of knee motion (RoM), and the length of each phase (Duration) were computed. The finite knee helical axis was analysed for momentary intervals of ~15° of knee motion by its intersection (ΔAP position) and inclination (ΔAP Inclination) with the knee's Anterior-Posterior (AP) axis. Static knee laxity (KT100) and self-reported knee function (Lysholm score) were also assessed. The results showed that both phases were shorter for the ACL groups compared to controls (CTRL-ACLR: Duration 35±8 ms, p = 0.000, CTRL-ACLPT: 33±9 ms, p = 0.000) and involved less knee flexion (CTRL-ACLR: RoM 6.6±1.9°, p = 0.002, CTRL-ACLR: 7.5 ±2.0°, p = 0.001). Low RoM and Duration correlated significantly with worse knee function according to Lysholm and higher knee laxity according to KT-1000. Three finite helical axes were analysed. The ΔAP position for the first axis was most anterior in ACLPT compared to ACLR (ΔAP position -1, ACLPT-ACLR: 13±3 mm, p = 0.004), with correlations to KT-1000 (rho 0.316, p = 0.008), while the ΔAP inclination for the third axis was smaller in the ACLPT group compared to controls (ΔAP inclination -3 ACLPT-CTRL: -13±5°, p = 0.004) and showed a significant side difference in ACL injured groups during Action (Injured-Non-injured: 8±2.7°, p = 0.006). Small ΔAP inclination -3 correlated with low Lysholm (rho 0.391, p = 0.002) and high KT-1000 (rho -0.450, p = 0.001). Conclusions Compensatory movement strategies seem to be used to protect the injured knee during landing. A decreased ΔAP inclination in injured knees during Action suggests that the dynamic knee control may remain compromised even long after injury.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165229 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0224261 (DOI)31671111 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-11-18Bibliographically approved
Öhberg, F., Bäcklund, T., Sundström, N. & Grip, H. (2019). Portable Sensors Add Reliable Kinematic Measures to the Assessment of Upper Extremity Function. Sensors, 19(5), Article ID 1241.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Portable Sensors Add Reliable Kinematic Measures to the Assessment of Upper Extremity Function
2019 (English)In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 5, article id 1241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ordinal scales with low resolution are used to assess arm function in clinic. These scales may be improved by adding objective kinematic measures. The aim was to analyze within-subject, inter-rater and overall reliability (i.e., including within-subject and inter-rater reliability) and check the system's validity of kinematic measures from inertial sensors for two such protocols on one person. Twenty healthy volunteers repeatedly performed two tasks, finger-to-nose and drinking, during two test sessions with two different raters. Five inertial sensors, on the forearms, upper arms and xiphoid process were used. Comparisons against an optical camera system evaluated the measurement validity. Cycle time, range of motion (ROM) in shoulder and elbow were calculated. Bland-Altman plots and linear mixed models including the generalizability (G) coefficient evaluated the reliability of the measures. Within-subject reliability was good to excellent in both tests (G = 0.80-0.97) and may serve as a baseline when assessing upper extremities in future patient groups. Overall reliability was acceptable to excellent (G = 0.77-0.94) for all parameters except elbow axial rotation in finger-to-nose task and both elbow axial rotation and flexion/extension in drinking task, mainly due to poor inter-rater reliability in these parameters. The low to good reliability for elbow ROM probably relates to high within-subject variability. The sensors provided good to excellent measures of cycle time and shoulder ROM in non-disabled individuals and thus have the potential to improve today's assessment of arm function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
inter-rater reliability, inertial sensor, kinematics, upper limb, arm function
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158105 (URN)10.3390/s19051241 (DOI)000462540400260 ()30870999 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Markström, J., Grip, H., Schelin, L. & Häger, C. (2018). Elite women athletes with superior knee function present similar dynamic knee stability, although different movement strategies, when compared to controls. In: 23rd annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science: Sport Science at the cutting edge, Dublin, July 4-7, 2018: . Paper presented at 23rd Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Dublin, July 4-7, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elite women athletes with superior knee function present similar dynamic knee stability, although different movement strategies, when compared to controls
2018 (English)In: 23rd annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science: Sport Science at the cutting edge, Dublin, July 4-7, 2018, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150557 (URN)
Conference
23rd Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Dublin, July 4-7, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-21
Markström, J., Grip, H., Schelin, L. & Häger, C. (2018). Similar dynamic knee stability but different movement strategies and between-leg asymmetries for hip and knee joints for ACL-reconstructed persons relative to knee-healthy controls. In: 8th World Congress of Biomechanics, Dublin, July 8-12, 2018: . Paper presented at 8th World Congress of Biomechanics, Dublin, July 8-12, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Similar dynamic knee stability but different movement strategies and between-leg asymmetries for hip and knee joints for ACL-reconstructed persons relative to knee-healthy controls
2018 (English)In: 8th World Congress of Biomechanics, Dublin, July 8-12, 2018, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150558 (URN)
Conference
8th World Congress of Biomechanics, Dublin, July 8-12, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-21
Johansson, G. M., Grip, H., Levin, M. F. & Häger, C. (2017). The added value of kinematic evaluation of the timed finger-to-nose test in persons post-stroke.. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 14, Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The added value of kinematic evaluation of the timed finger-to-nose test in persons post-stroke.
2017 (English)In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1743-0003, E-ISSN 1743-0003, Vol. 14, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Upper limb coordination in persons post-stroke may be estimated by the commonly used Finger-to-Nose Test (FNT), which is also part of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. The total movement time (TMT) is used as a clinical outcome measure, while kinematic evaluation also enables an objective quantification of movement quality and motor performance. Our aims were to kinematically characterize FNT performance in persons post-stroke and controls and to investigate the construct validity of the test in persons with varying levels of impairment post-stroke.

METHODS: A three-dimensional motion capture system recorded body movements during performance of the FNT in 33 persons post-stroke who had mild or moderate upper limb motor impairments (Fugl-Meyer scores of 50-62 or 32-49, respectively), and 41 non-disabled controls. TMT and kinematic variables of the hand (pointing time, peak speed, time to peak speed, number of movement units, path ratio, and pointing accuracy), elbow/shoulder joints (range of motion, interjoint coordination), and scapular/trunk movement were calculated. Our analysis focused on the pointing phase (knee to nose movement of the FNT). Independent t or Mann-Whitney U tests and effect sizes were used to analyze group differences. Sub-group analyses based on movement time and stroke severity were performed. Within the stroke group, simple and multiple linear regression were used to identify relationships between TMT to kinematic variables.

RESULTS: The stroke group had significant slower TMT (mean difference 2.6 s, d = 1.33) than the control group, and six other kinematic variables showed significant group differences. At matched speeds, the stroke group had lower accuracy and excessive scapular and trunk movements compared to controls. Pointing time and elbow flexion during the pointing phase were most related to stroke severity. For the stroke group, the number of movement units during the pointing phase showed the strongest association with the TMT, and explained 60% of the TMT variance.

CONCLUSIONS: The timed FNT discriminates between persons with mild and moderate upper limb impairments. However, kinematic analysis to address construct validity highlights differences in pointing movement post-stroke that are not captured in the timed FNT.

Keywords
Stroke, Kinematic assessment, Arm, Hand, Validity
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132345 (URN)10.1186/s12984-017-0220-7 (DOI)000394720500001 ()28183337 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Grip, H., Johansson, A.-M., Selling, J., Rönnqvist, L., Boraxbekk, C.-J. & Häger, C. (2017). Three dimensional kinematic analyses of finger movement control and association to brain activity responses: A pilot study on healthy individuals. Gait & Posture, 57, 355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three dimensional kinematic analyses of finger movement control and association to brain activity responses: A pilot study on healthy individuals
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2017 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 57, p. 355-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: An increased knowledge of how the brain control finger movements give us keys to understand the recovery of motor function after a brain injury. This knowledge is crucial for the development of reliable and valid assessment methods in the clinical evaluation of hand function.

Research question: How are individual finger movements represented in the brain? Investigating the associations between kinematics and brain activity responses in healthy individuals.

Methods: Keeping the others still. Finger movements were performed lying in the MR scanner in order to register brain activity response during the task. Optoelectronic cameras simultaneously monitored the positions of reflective markers affixed to each finger. The marker position data were used to calculate each finger's movement frequency (MF),  movement independence (“Individuation Index”, II), stationary ability (Stationarity Index, SI)[1][1]. fMRI data was analyzed by contrasting the finger movements against its active rest.

Results: Preliminary analyses showed that (1) the finger movements primarily activate sensorimotor areas in the contralateral hemisphere (Fig. 1A), (2) that use of kinematic parameters in the fMRI analyses improved spatial specificity and (3) II engage a number of cortical areas, while MF engage fewer areas (Fig. 1B–D). Further analyses will further explore activations maps for each individual finger.

Discussion: The inclusion of movement parameters in the fMRI analyses improves the specificity in the derived activation map, increasing the interpretability of the neural correlates of movement control. This advancement carries the promise for the development of better assessment methods of the recovery of function post-stroke with usability in rehabilitation practices.

National Category
Physiotherapy Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Psychology
Research subject
physiotherapy; Radiology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139887 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.06.464 (DOI)
Note

Supplement 1, Meeting abstract P110

Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Markström, J. L., Tengman, E., Grip, H., Schelin, L. & Häger, C. K. (2016). A comparison of knee joint kinematics and kinetics during landings in three one-leg hop tests (hop for distance, vertical hop and side hop) performed by female elite floorball athletes. In: XXI ISEK Congress: Bridges to Innovation. Paper presented at 21st International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology, Chicago, July 5-8, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of knee joint kinematics and kinetics during landings in three one-leg hop tests (hop for distance, vertical hop and side hop) performed by female elite floorball athletes
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2016 (English)In: XXI ISEK Congress: Bridges to Innovation, 2016Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144890 (URN)
Conference
21st International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology, Chicago, July 5-8, 2016
Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1635-122x

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