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Grip, Helena
Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
Markström, J., Grip, H., Schelin, L. & Häger, C. (2018). Elite women athletes with superior knee function present similar dynamic knee stability, although different movement strategies, when compared to controls. In: 23rd annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science: Sport Science at the cutting edge, Dublin, July 4-7, 2018: . Paper presented at 23rd Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Dublin, July 4-7, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elite women athletes with superior knee function present similar dynamic knee stability, although different movement strategies, when compared to controls
2018 (English)In: 23rd annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science: Sport Science at the cutting edge, Dublin, July 4-7, 2018, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150557 (URN)
Conference
23rd Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Dublin, July 4-7, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-21
Markström, J., Grip, H., Schelin, L. & Häger, C. (2018). Similar dynamic knee stability but different movement strategies and between-leg asymmetries for hip and knee joints for ACL-reconstructed persons relative to knee-healthy controls. In: 8th World Congress of Biomechanics, Dublin, July 8-12, 2018: . Paper presented at 8th World Congress of Biomechanics, Dublin, July 8-12, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Similar dynamic knee stability but different movement strategies and between-leg asymmetries for hip and knee joints for ACL-reconstructed persons relative to knee-healthy controls
2018 (English)In: 8th World Congress of Biomechanics, Dublin, July 8-12, 2018, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150558 (URN)
Conference
8th World Congress of Biomechanics, Dublin, July 8-12, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-21
Johansson, G. M., Grip, H., Levin, M. F. & Häger, C. (2017). The added value of kinematic evaluation of the timed finger-to-nose test in persons post-stroke.. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 14, Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The added value of kinematic evaluation of the timed finger-to-nose test in persons post-stroke.
2017 (English)In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1743-0003, E-ISSN 1743-0003, Vol. 14, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Upper limb coordination in persons post-stroke may be estimated by the commonly used Finger-to-Nose Test (FNT), which is also part of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. The total movement time (TMT) is used as a clinical outcome measure, while kinematic evaluation also enables an objective quantification of movement quality and motor performance. Our aims were to kinematically characterize FNT performance in persons post-stroke and controls and to investigate the construct validity of the test in persons with varying levels of impairment post-stroke.

METHODS: A three-dimensional motion capture system recorded body movements during performance of the FNT in 33 persons post-stroke who had mild or moderate upper limb motor impairments (Fugl-Meyer scores of 50-62 or 32-49, respectively), and 41 non-disabled controls. TMT and kinematic variables of the hand (pointing time, peak speed, time to peak speed, number of movement units, path ratio, and pointing accuracy), elbow/shoulder joints (range of motion, interjoint coordination), and scapular/trunk movement were calculated. Our analysis focused on the pointing phase (knee to nose movement of the FNT). Independent t or Mann-Whitney U tests and effect sizes were used to analyze group differences. Sub-group analyses based on movement time and stroke severity were performed. Within the stroke group, simple and multiple linear regression were used to identify relationships between TMT to kinematic variables.

RESULTS: The stroke group had significant slower TMT (mean difference 2.6 s, d = 1.33) than the control group, and six other kinematic variables showed significant group differences. At matched speeds, the stroke group had lower accuracy and excessive scapular and trunk movements compared to controls. Pointing time and elbow flexion during the pointing phase were most related to stroke severity. For the stroke group, the number of movement units during the pointing phase showed the strongest association with the TMT, and explained 60% of the TMT variance.

CONCLUSIONS: The timed FNT discriminates between persons with mild and moderate upper limb impairments. However, kinematic analysis to address construct validity highlights differences in pointing movement post-stroke that are not captured in the timed FNT.

Keywords
Stroke, Kinematic assessment, Arm, Hand, Validity
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132345 (URN)10.1186/s12984-017-0220-7 (DOI)000394720500001 ()28183337 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Grip, H., Johansson, A.-M., Selling, J., Rönnqvist, L., Boraxbekk, C.-J. & Häger, C. (2017). Three dimensional kinematic analyses of finger movement control and association to brain activity responses: A pilot study on healthy individuals. Gait & Posture, 57, 355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three dimensional kinematic analyses of finger movement control and association to brain activity responses: A pilot study on healthy individuals
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2017 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 57, p. 355-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: An increased knowledge of how the brain control finger movements give us keys to understand the recovery of motor function after a brain injury. This knowledge is crucial for the development of reliable and valid assessment methods in the clinical evaluation of hand function.

Research question: How are individual finger movements represented in the brain? Investigating the associations between kinematics and brain activity responses in healthy individuals.

Methods: Keeping the others still. Finger movements were performed lying in the MR scanner in order to register brain activity response during the task. Optoelectronic cameras simultaneously monitored the positions of reflective markers affixed to each finger. The marker position data were used to calculate each finger's movement frequency (MF),  movement independence (“Individuation Index”, II), stationary ability (Stationarity Index, SI)[1][1]. fMRI data was analyzed by contrasting the finger movements against its active rest.

Results: Preliminary analyses showed that (1) the finger movements primarily activate sensorimotor areas in the contralateral hemisphere (Fig. 1A), (2) that use of kinematic parameters in the fMRI analyses improved spatial specificity and (3) II engage a number of cortical areas, while MF engage fewer areas (Fig. 1B–D). Further analyses will further explore activations maps for each individual finger.

Discussion: The inclusion of movement parameters in the fMRI analyses improves the specificity in the derived activation map, increasing the interpretability of the neural correlates of movement control. This advancement carries the promise for the development of better assessment methods of the recovery of function post-stroke with usability in rehabilitation practices.

National Category
Physiotherapy Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Psychology
Research subject
physiotherapy; Radiology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139887 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.06.464 (DOI)
Note

Supplement 1, Meeting abstract P110

Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Markström, J. L., Tengman, E., Grip, H., Schelin, L. & Häger, C. K. (2016). A comparison of knee joint kinematics and kinetics during landings in three one-leg hop tests (hop for distance, vertical hop and side hop) performed by female elite floorball athletes. In: XXI ISEK Congress: Bridges to Innovation. Paper presented at 21st International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology, Chicago, July 5-8, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of knee joint kinematics and kinetics during landings in three one-leg hop tests (hop for distance, vertical hop and side hop) performed by female elite floorball athletes
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2016 (English)In: XXI ISEK Congress: Bridges to Innovation, 2016Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144890 (URN)
Conference
21st International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology, Chicago, July 5-8, 2016
Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ertzgaard, P., Öhberg, F., Gerdle, B. & Grip, H. (2016). A new way of assessing arm function in activity using kinematic Exposure Variation Analysis and portable inertial sensors - A validity study. Manual Therapy, 21, 241-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new way of assessing arm function in activity using kinematic Exposure Variation Analysis and portable inertial sensors - A validity study
2016 (English)In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 21, p. 241-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Portable motion systems based on inertial motion sensors are promising methods, with the advantage compared to optoelectronic cameras of not being confined to a laboratory setting. A challenge is to develop relevant outcome measures for clinical use. The aim of this study was to characterize elbow and shoulder motion during functional tasks, using portable motion sensors and a modified Exposure Variation Analysis (EVA) and evaluate system accuracy with optoelectronic cameras. Ten healthy volunteers and one participant with sequel after stroke performed standardised functional arm tasks. Motion was registered simultaneously with a custom developed motion sensor system, including gyroscopes and accelerometers, and an optoelectronic camera system. The EVA was applied on elbow and shoulder joints, and angular and angular velocity EVA plots was calculated. The EVA showed characteristic patterns for each arm task in the healthy controls and a distinct difference between the affected and unaffected arm in the participant with sequel after stroke. The accuracy of the portable system was high with a systematic error ranging between -1.2 degrees and 2.0 degrees. The error was direction specific due to a drift component along the gravity vector. Portable motion sensor systems have high potential as clinical tools for evaluation of arm function. EVA effectively illustrates joint angle and joint angle velocity patterns that may capture deficiencies in arm function and movement quality. Next step will be to manage system drift by including magnetometers, to further develop clinically relevant outcome variables and apply this for relevant patient groups.

Keywords
Upper extremity motion analysis, Portable motion sensors, Exposure Variation Analysis, Validity
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120666 (URN)10.1016/j.math.2015.09.004 (DOI)000373615100033 ()26456185 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-16 Created: 2016-05-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A.-M., Grip, H., Strong, A., Selling, J., Rönnqvist, L., Boraxbekk, C.-J. & Häger, C. (2016). Finger movement control and associated brain activity responses post-stroke. In: XXI ISEK Congress: . Paper presented at The International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Finger movement control and associated brain activity responses post-stroke
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2016 (English)In: XXI ISEK Congress, 2016Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Impaired finger dexterity is common after stroke, often affecting activities of daily living. Knowledge of kinematic characteristics and of underlying neurological mechanisms of such impairments is important to understand functional recovery. This study aims to investigate finger movement control and related brain activity patterns post-stroke (PS). METHODS: Data from a subsample including 9 participants PS with residual hemiparesis affecting manual dexterity (M age- 66; 3 female) and 12 able-bodied control (C) participants (M age- 65; 3 female) were analyzed. Two series of self-paced cyclic finger extension-flexion movements in random order were performed for each hand (4 series with vision, V, and 4 without vision, NV). Optoelectronic cameras monitored the 3D movement of markers affixed to the fingertips. Motion data was used to calculate each finger's individuation index (II), reflecting movement independence, each finger's Stationarity index (SI), reflecting the ability to keep the finger still while another moves [1] and Movement frequency (MF). Functional magnetic resonance imaging, with simultaneous movement recording, was used to investigate brain activity patterns in relation to the kinematic parameters. II, SI, MF and the effect of vision were analyzed for the 4th digit. RESULTS: A factorial ANOVA 2 [group] x 2 [condition] x 2 [side] x [index type] showed an effect for group (p < .0001; PS < C); condition (p < .01; NV < V); side (p < .0001; affected/non-preferred < non-affected/preferred); and index type (p < .0001; SI < II). An interaction between group and side (p < .01) showed that indices of the affected side were lower compared to the non-affected side within the PS group and compared to both sides in the C group. No significant effects were apparent for MF but significant correlations were found between the indices and MF that were restricted to the PS group alone (over all conditions- r = -0.22; p < .01; within the NV condition- r = -0.19; p < .01; within the affected side r = -0.15; p < .05; and within the SI categorization r = -0.14; p < .05). Furthermore, within NV for the non-affected hand on the SI alone (r = -0.54; p < .05). All indicate that slower movements had higher indices. DISCUSSION: The associations between slower MF and higher index values within the PS group were located to conditions with increased difficulty (NV, affected side, and SI). Thus, reducing speed may be a selected strategy to increase control of finger movements PS when the demand on motor control is high. Further, with the applied calculation of finger movement independence we were able detect group differences, side differences within the PS group, and a positive effect of vision of the hands during performance. This indicates that this calculation is a sensitive measure that could be used to study the effects of stroke and to monitor progression in motor recovery. [1] Häger-Ross & Schieber, 2000, J Neurosci 20:8542-50

National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128988 (URN)
Conference
The International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology
Projects
http://www.umu.se/sok/forskningsdatabasen/visa-forskningsprojekt?code=534&currentView=base&doSearch=&scbCode=&searchString=&uid=chha0003&guiseId=78497&orgId=d8a4ce60e452301d20c1259fb8263ff75bebcfdc&name=Charlotte%20H%C3%A4ger
Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Sole, G., Tengman, E., Grip, H. & Häger, C. (2016). Knee kinematics during stair descent 20 years following anterior cruciate ligament rupture with and without reconstruction. Clinical Biomechanics, 32, 180-186
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knee kinematics during stair descent 20 years following anterior cruciate ligament rupture with and without reconstruction
2016 (English)In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 32, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Changes and asymmetries for walking gait have been explored extensively following injuries of anterior cruciate ligaments within ten years of injury or reconstruction. We examined longer term knee joint kinematics of reconstructed and non-reconstructed knees during stair descent compared to controls. Methods: Three-dimensional knee kinematics during stair descent were registered for 33 subjects with ACL reconstruction, 36 subjects with ACL rupture managed with physiotherapy only and 31 uninjured controls. Injured subjects were 23.5 (2.1) years following injury. Linear mixed models were used to compare temporal variables and knee kinematics during stance phase between groups and contralateral sides. Findings: Walking speed was slower for the both ACL-injured groups compared to controls and stance duration was longer for the injured than the uninjured sides of the physiotherapy-only group. Compared to controls, the physiotherapy-only group had significantly less adduction at initial foot contact of the injured and uninjured knees. The uninjured side of the physiotherapy-only group also had less flexion than controls at initial foot contact and during weight acceptance. Compared to the surgically-managed group, the injured sides of the physiotherapy-only groups had significantly less adduction at initial contact, peak adduction during weight acceptance, and peak flexion during propulsion. Interpretation: Independent of treatment, altered knee kinematics exist more than 20 years following ACL injury during stair descent. We suggest that future studies investigating short and long-term kinematic outcomes of ACL injury could evaluate stair descent with particular emphasis on weight acceptance of stance, and potential associations to perceived knee function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Stair ambulation, Anterior cruciate ligament rupture, Kinematics, Outcomes
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119673 (URN)10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2015.11.013 (DOI)000372689400027 ()26690754 (PubMedID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-04-28 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Tengman, E., Grip, H., Stensdotter, A.-K. & Häger, C. K. (2015). Anterior cruciate ligament injury about 20 years post-treatment: a kinematic analysis of one-leg hop. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 25(6), 818-827
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anterior cruciate ligament injury about 20 years post-treatment: a kinematic analysis of one-leg hop
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 818-827Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reduced dynamic knee stability, often evaluated with one-leg hops (OLHs), is reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. This may lead to long-standing altered movement patterns, which are less investigated. 3D kinematics during OLH were explored in 70 persons 23 +/- 2 years after ACL injury; 33 were treated with physiotherapy in combination with ACL reconstruction (ACL(R)) and 37 with physiotherapy alone (ACL(PT)). Comparisons were made to 33 matched controls. We analyzed (a) maximal knee joint angles and range of motion (flexion, abduction, rotation); (b) medio-lateral position of the center of mass (COM) in relation to knee and ankle joint centers, during take-off and landing phases. Unlike controls, ACL-injured displayed leg asymmetries: less knee flexion and less internal rotation at take-off and landing and more lateral COM related to knee and ankle joint of the injured leg at landing. Compared to controls, ACL(R) had larger external rotation of the injured leg at landing. ACL(PT) showed less knee flexion and larger external rotation at take-off and landing, and larger knee abduction at Landing. COM was more medial in relation to the knee at take-off and less laterally placed relative to the ankle at landing. ACL injury results in long-term kinematic alterations during OLH, which are less evident for ACL(R).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
biomechanics, long-term perspective, knee, jump performance
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113723 (URN)10.1111/sms.12434 (DOI)000365452600024 ()25728035 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-30 Created: 2015-12-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Grip, H., Tengman, E. & Häger, C. (2015). Dynamic knee stability as estimated by finite helical axis methods during drop landing twenty years after anterior cruciate ligament injury. Paper presented at 1st Clinical Movement Analysis World Conference, 23rd Annual Meeting of the European Society of Movement analysis in Adults and Children (ESMAC), Rom Sept 29 - Oct 4. Journal of Biomechanics, 48(10), 1906-1914
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic knee stability as estimated by finite helical axis methods during drop landing twenty years after anterior cruciate ligament injury
2015 (English)In: Journal of Biomechanics, ISSN 0021-9290, E-ISSN 1873-2380, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 1906-1914Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Finite helical axis (FHA) measures of the knee joint during weight-bearing tasks may capture dynamic knee stability following Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury. The aim was to investigate dynamic knee stability during two-leg squat (TLS) and one-leg side hop (SH) in a long-term follow-up of ACL injury, and to examine correlations with knee laxity (KT-1000), osteoarthritis (OA, Kellgren–Lawrence) and knee function (Lysholm score). Participants were injured 17–28 years ago and then treated with surgery (n=33, ACLR) or physiotherapy only (n=37, ACLPT) and healthy-knee controls (n=33) were tested. Movements were registered with an optical motion capture system. We computed three FHA inclination angles, its' Anterior–Posterior (A–P) position, and an index quantifying directional changes (DI), during stepwise knee flexion intervals of ∼15°. Injured knees were less stable compared to healthy controls' and to contralateral non-injured knees, regardless of treatment: the A–P intersection was more anterior (indicating a more anterior positioning of tibia relative to femur) positively correlating with high laxity/low knee function, and during SH, the FHA was more inclined relative to the flexion–extension axis, possibly due to reduced rotational stability. During the TLS, A–P intersection was more anterior in the non-injured knee than the injured, and DI was higher, probably related to higher load on the non-injured knee. ACLR had less anterior A–P intersection than ACLPT, suggesting that surgery enhanced stability, although rotational stability may remain reduced. More anterior A–P intersection and greater inclination between the FHA and the knee flexion–extension axis best revealed reduced dynamic stability ∼23 years post-injury.

Keywords
Finite helical axis, Anterior cruciate ligament injury, Dynamic knee stability, Long-term follow up, Motion analysis
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110339 (URN)10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.04.016 (DOI)000358459800031 ()
Conference
1st Clinical Movement Analysis World Conference, 23rd Annual Meeting of the European Society of Movement analysis in Adults and Children (ESMAC), Rom Sept 29 - Oct 4
Available from: 2015-11-26 Created: 2015-10-21 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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