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Persson, Lars
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Carlén, O., Bostedt, G., Brännlund, R. & Persson, L. (2019). Gone fishing: The value of recreational fishing in Sweden. Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gone fishing: The value of recreational fishing in Sweden
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Data from a unique nationwide recreational fishing survey in Sweden is used to estimate benefits of recreational fishing in Sweden, differences between regions and age groups, and how they relate to expected catch. The data targets the whole Swedish population, and as a consequence a large fraction of zero fishing days exists in the sample. To consider this, a zeroinflated Poisson model was used. Swedes fished around 16 million days in 2013, of which twothirds was spent on inland fishing, and one third was spent on marine and costal fishing. Expected consumer surplus per fishing day vary over the season, from about SEK 23 for winter fishing, to SEK 148 for summer fishing. The highest consumer surplus values are found among the youngest and the oldest age groups that were surveyed. Expected catch is an important determinant for number of fishing days, but catch increases mainly influence summer fishing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2019
Series
CERE Working Paper ; 2019:2
Keywords
Consumer surplus, Recreational fishing, TCM, ZIP-model
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157826 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved
Broberg, T., Daniel, A. M. & Persson, L. (2019). Household preferences for load restrictions: is there an effect of pro-environmental framing?. The Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE), Umeå University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Household preferences for load restrictions: is there an effect of pro-environmental framing?
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we investigate if a pro-environmental framing influences households' stated willingness to accept restrictions on their electricity use. We use a split-sample choice experiment (CE) and ask respondents to choose between their current electricity contract and hypothetical contracts featuring various load controls and a monetary compensation. Our results indicate that the pro-environmental framing have little impact on the respondents' choices. We observe a significant framing eeffect on choices and marginal willingness-to-accept (MWTA) for only a few contract attributes. The results further suggest that there is no significant framing effect among households that engage in different pro-environmental activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE), Umeå University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 2019. p. 28
Series
CERE Working Paper ; 2019:8
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162534 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Daniel, A. M., Persson, L. & Sandorf, E. D. (2018). Accounting for elimination-by-aspects strategies and demand management in electricity contract choice. Energy Economics, 73, 80-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accounting for elimination-by-aspects strategies and demand management in electricity contract choice
2018 (English)In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 73, p. 80-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we report on a discrete choice experiment aimed at eliciting Swedish households' willingness-to-accept a compensation for restrictions on household electricity and heating use during peak hours. When analyzing data from discrete choice experiments it is typically assumed that people make rational utility maximizing decisions, i.e., that they consider all of the attribute information and compare all alternatives. However, mounting evidence shows that people use a wide range of simplifying strategies that are inconsistent with utility maximization. We use a flexible model capturing a two-stage decision process. In the first stage, respondents are allowed to eliminate from their choice set alternatives that contain an unacceptable level, in this case restrictions on the use of heating and electricity. In the second stage, respondents choose in a compensatory manner between the remaining alternatives. Our results show that about half of the respondents choose according to an elimination-by-aspects strategy, and that, on average, they are unwilling to accept any restrictions on heating in the evening or electricity use irrespective of time-of-day. Furthermore, considering elimination-by-aspects behavior leads to a downward shift in elicited willingness-to-accept. We discuss implications for policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Choice experiment, Electricity contract, Willingness-to-accept, Household electricity use, Elimination-by-aspects, Two-stage decision
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155146 (URN)10.1016/j.eneco.2018.05.009 (DOI)000438000600006 ()2-s2.0-85047459958 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Amjadi, G., Lundgren, T. & Persson, L. (2018). The Rebound Effect in Swedish Heavy Industry. Energy Economics, 71, 140-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Rebound Effect in Swedish Heavy Industry
2018 (English)In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 71, p. 140-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy efficiency improvement (EEI) benefits the climate and matters for energy security. The potential emission and energy savings due to EEI may however not fully materialize due to the rebound effect. In this study, we measure the size of the rebound effect for fuel and electricity within the four most energy intensive sectors in Sweden: pulp and paper, basic iron and steel, chemical, and mining. We use a detailed firm-level panel data set for 2000–2008 and apply Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) for measuring the rebound effect. We find that neither fuel nor electricity rebound effects fully offset the potential energy and emission savings. Among the determinants, we find CO2 intensity and fuel/electricity share to be useful indicators for identifying firms with higher or lower rebound effect within each sector.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Energy efficiency improvement, Rebound effect, Stochastic Frontier Analysis
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145666 (URN)10.1016/j.eneco.2018.02.001 (DOI)000431159100011 ()2-s2.0-85042628038 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Daniel, A. M., Persson, L. & Sandorf, E. D. (2017). Accounting for Elimination-by-Aspects Strategies and Demand Management in Electricity Contract Choice. Umeå
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accounting for Elimination-by-Aspects Strategies and Demand Management in Electricity Contract Choice
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We report on a discrete choice experiment aimed at eliciting Swedish households’ willingness-to-accept a compensation for restrictions on household electricity and heating use during peak hours. When analyzing data from discrete choice experiments, we typically assume that people make rational utility maximizing decisions, i.e., that they consider all of the attribute information and compare all alternatives. However, mounting evidence shows that people use a wide range of simplifying strategies that are inconsistent with utility maximization. We use a flexible model capturing a two-stage decision process. In the first stage, respondents are allowed to eliminate from their choice set alternatives that contain an unacceptable level, i.e., restrictions on the use of heating and electricity. In the second stage, respondents choose in a compensatory manner between the remaining alternatives. Our results show that about half of our respondents choose according to an elimination-by-aspects strategy, and that, on average, they are unwilling to accept any restrictions on heating in the evening or electricity use, irrespective of time-of-day. Furthermore, we find that considering elimination-by-aspects behavior leads to a downward shift in elicited willingness-to-accept. We discuss implications for policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2017
Series
CERE Working Paper ; 2017:7
Keywords
Choice experiment, Electricity contract, Willingness-to-accept, Household electricity, Elimination-by-aspects, Two-stage decision
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145713 (URN)
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Broberg, T., Brännlund, R. & Persson, L. (2017). Consumer preferences and soft load control on the Swedish electricity market.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumer preferences and soft load control on the Swedish electricity market
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The main purpose of the present report is to present the results of the project "The electricity customer, a new power on the electricity market?" The main purpose of the project is to estimate lost values due to various restrictions on household electricity consumption, which gives us "prices" of schematic reductions in power through behavioral adaptations among Swedish households. Another purpose is to estimate households' costs for short power outages, which gives a "price" of a targeted disconnection of electricity. The willingness of households to adjust their electricity consumption is governed by several factors - both economic and non-economic. An additional objective is therefore to analyze the extent to which households are willing to adapt for non-economic reasons, for example, to facilitate the integration of renewable electricity production such as solar and wind power.

To achieve the objectives of the project, we analyze household habits and preferences for electricity usage in connection with daily demand peaks during winter time in Sweden. We have chosen an empirical approach where households are subjected to choose between hypothetical electricity contracts where different types of restrictions in the use of large-scale household appliances are included. The different characteristics of the agreements or contracts relate to (1) maximum power usage in watts, (2) the duration of the restriction, (3) number of occasions of restriction and (4) the ability to change the selection of which electrical appliances to be used during the restriction.

In addition to the above-mentioned approach, we also study how this relates to other electricity usage (e.g. heating, lighting, TV, etc.). This is done by asking households for compensation requirements to accept full power outages, i.e. black-outs. By studying the difference in compensation requirements between the "soft" limitation and the black-outs, the value of different loads can be estimated.

The results reveal that households on average require a compensation of SEK 2000 - 3700 depending on the severity of electricity consumption constraint. Depending on how we define the potential loss in potential electricity usage for different scenarios, the results can be translated to be between SEK 20 and 40 per kWh. In the case of total power outages, the valuation is significantly higher and corresponds to SEK 3000 to 4600. This can in turn be translated to the equivalent of SEK 400 - 600 per kWh. The results thus indicate a significant difference between the value of the load in a soft control DSM program, and the remaining load (e.g. heating, lighting and TV). Compared to previous literature on the value of lost load, VOLL, our estimates fall in the higher range, especially compared to Swedish studies. We believe this is in line with the context outlined in the present study with rather many occasions of disruptions at the peak demand hour.

The results also show that a pro-environmental cheap talk make people more likely to opt into a DSM program with load controlled at many occasions. It did not, however, make people see more lenient on hard load controls in general.

An immediate policy implication from the results is that specific policies aiming at stimulating behavioral changes probably are very ineffective and/or costly. As a result, policies to affect demand response should focus on automatization and passive response. A related policy implication is that it is far from obvious that demand response is always more cost effective than supply response, i.e., increasing production of electricity. 

Series
CERE working paper ; 2017:9
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143019 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Amjadi, G., Lundgren, T., Persson, L. & Zhang, S. (2017). The rebound effect in the Swedish heavy industry.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The rebound effect in the Swedish heavy industry
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Energy efficiency improvement (EEI) benefits the climate and matters for energy security. The potential emission and energy savings due to EEI may however not fully materialize due to the rebound effect. In this study, we measure the size of rebound effect for the two energy types fuel and electricity within the four most energy intensive sectors in Sweden – pulp and paper, basic iron and steel, chemical, and mining. We use a detailed firm-level panel data set for the period 2000-2008 and apply Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) for measuring the rebound effect. We find that both fuel and electricity rebound effects do not fully offset the potential for energy and emission savings. Furthermore, we find CO2 intensity and fuel and electricity share as the two main determinants of rebound effect in Swedish heavy industry. Our results seems to imply that it matters both to what extent and where to promote EEI, as the rebound effect varies between sectors as well as between firms within sectors. 

Series
CERE working paper ; 2017:1
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130877 (URN)
Available from: 2017-01-31 Created: 2017-01-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Bostedt, G., Brännlund, R., Carlén, O., Gisselman, F. & Persson, L. (2016). Fiskefria områden ur ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv: En empirisk studie. Umeå
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fiskefria områden ur ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv: En empirisk studie
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2016 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2016
Series
CERE Working paper ; 2016:17
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129165 (URN)
Available from: 2016-12-21 Created: 2016-12-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Bostedt, G., Brännlund, R., Carlén, O. & Persson, L. (2016). Fiskefria områden ur ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv: en konceptuell analys. Umeå: Department of Economics, Umeå University; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fiskefria områden ur ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv: en konceptuell analys
2016 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Huvudsyftet med föreliggande rapport är att på ett övergripande och konceptuellt plan beskriva innebörden av en samhällsekonomisk nytto- och kostnadsanalys, eller samhällsekonomisk bedömning, och hur en sådan kan och bör genomföras för att analysera samhällsnyttan av fiskefria områden. Vidare syftar rapporten till att exemplifiera vilken typ av empiriska data och metoder som finns tillgängliga för en sådan analys med hjälp av den fritidsfiskeundersökning som årligen görs i regi av Hav och Vattenmyndigheten.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Department of Economics, Umeå University; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 2016. p. 57
Series
CERE working paper ; 2016:7
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119760 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-26 Created: 2016-04-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Broberg, T. & Persson, L. (2016). Is our everyday comfort for sale?: preferences for demand management on the electricity market. Energy Economics, 54, 24-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is our everyday comfort for sale?: preferences for demand management on the electricity market
2016 (English)In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 54, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a European perspective, the electricity markets have been experiencing major changes via deregulation, new technologies and changes in the production mix. Together with the daily and seasonal peak hours on the demand side, the changing markets put pressure on increased flexibility to handle and sustain balance in the grid systems. This paper focuses on the demand side and analyzes preferences related to demand management of Swedish households' energy use. In a web-based choice experiment respondents were faced with three hypothetical electricity contracts. The choices of preferred contracts revealed preferences for attributes related to external control of heating, household electricity and information dissemination (integrity). The results show that people put a substantial value on not being controlled, illustrated by compensations up to thousands of SEK for accepting a contract characterized by external control of energy use in various dimensions. In addition, the results show that household composition, age, gender and income play a role for the perceived discomfort from the external control and information dissemination. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Choice experiment, Demand side management, Electricity market, Energy policy, Demand response, ad control, Smart grids
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119078 (URN)10.1016/j.eneco.2015.11.005 (DOI)000371942000003 ()
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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