umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Rantatalo, Oscar
Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Sjöberg, D., Karp, S. & Rantatalo, O. (2019). What students who perform in "secondary roles" can learn from scenario training in vocational education. International Journal for Research in Vocational Education and Training, 6(1), 46-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What students who perform in "secondary roles" can learn from scenario training in vocational education
2019 (English)In: International Journal for Research in Vocational Education and Training, ISSN 2197-8638, E-ISSN 2197-8646, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 46-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Learning through scenario training and live simulation in vocational education is generally regarded as an effective tool for developing professional knowledge. However, previous research has largely overlooked the learning of students in secondary roles in scenario training. The objective of this study is to explore learning for students who act in secondary roles during scenario training in vocational educational settings. 

Method: The studied case entails scenario training for police students in a Swedish police education programme. A case study design, which included both participant observation and a questionnaire, was used. The analytic lens applied was inspired by practice theory and focused on how structural and situational arrangements of the training activity affect learning. 

Results: Our findings show that students who act in secondary roles learn from their scenario training experiences, but this learning often is overlooked in the design of training activities. Due to the structural arrangements of training activities, learning emerged as students in secondary roles were tasked to support the primary participants in relation to their learning objectives. In addition, it emerged in how students in secondary roles used previous scenario training experiences in relation to the current scenario and its learning objectives. Examples of learning from situational arrangements emerged as students in secondary roles formulated and provided feedback to primary participants and through informal discussions and reflection processes. Learning also emerged as students in secondary roles embodied the “other” during scenario training, something that provided the students with new perspectives on police encounters. 

Conclusions: We theorize and extract three dimensions for how learning emerges in this case for secondary participants. It emerges through embodying the “other”, in students’ sensory experiences, and through reconstruction of knowledge through repetition. However, our findings also show that learning for students in secondary roles can be improved through mindful set-up and design. Based on the findings, our article provides a discussion and suggestions on how scenario training can be planned and set-up to develop professional knowledge for students in secondary roles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Bremen, 2019
Keywords
Scenario Training, Simulation, Vocational Education and Training, VET, Learning, Police Education, Practice
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158405 (URN)10.13152/IJRVET.6.1.3 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Rantatalo, O. & Lindberg, O. (2018). Liminal practice and reflection in professional education: police education and medical education. Studies in Continuing Education, 40(3), 351-366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liminal practice and reflection in professional education: police education and medical education
2018 (English)In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 351-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on a study of how liminality relates to the facilitation of reflective practice in professional education. Liminality refers to sites and positions that exhibit 'in-betweenness', or bordering positions, that might draw together different institutional conditions. The present project aims to examine the role of liminality in professional educational practice with a specific focus upon how liminality may support student reflection. Using a qualitative and comparative research approach, we analysed interview and observational data from police education and a medical programme. Observations and interviews explore practices of collective interactional (and hence observable) reflection at sites that are characterised by ‘betweenness’ of work and education. Findings indicate that situations that afford reflection are characterised by a sense of undeterminedness in terms of either the subject, space or activity. Thus, we conclude that there is some evidence that liminality affords reflection, but also that liminality and underminedness are fragile states that are not easily organised in a professional education curriculum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Liminality, practice theory, police education, medical education
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145756 (URN)10.1080/0158037X.2018.1447918 (DOI)000442433800009 ()
Note

Special issue: Professional Practice, Education and Learning: A Sociomaterial Perspective

Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Rantatalo, O., Lindberg, O., Kihlberg, R. & Hällgren, M. (2018). Negotiations and Research Bargains: Bending Professional Norms in the Effort to Gain Field Access. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 17(1), 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiations and Research Bargains: Bending Professional Norms in the Effort to Gain Field Access
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, ISSN 1609-4069, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study provides an autoethnographic account of the efforts to gain field access to a police organization, spanning more than 2 years. The aim is to describe a case of gaining access in relation to the professional norms of science put forward by Robert K. Merton. Aided by an organized record of notes, e-mails, and other written communications regarding access (144 memos of various types), the study describes and discusses the negotiations with Mertonian norms that followed from the dissonance between ideals of research and practical reality. Opening up for further scholarly discussion, this article concludes that Merton’s norms are incongruent with both prevailing guidelines of research ethics and with the practical, short-term problems of access negotiations and research bargains.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
field access, ethnography, police, Robert Merton, qualitative research
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146931 (URN)10.1177/1609406918770033 (DOI)000431711000001 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00700
Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Rantatalo, O. & Karp, S. (2018). Stories of policing: the role of storytelling in police students' sensemaking of early work-based experiences. Vocations and Learning, 11(1), 161-177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stories of policing: the role of storytelling in police students' sensemaking of early work-based experiences
2018 (English)In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 161-177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Storytelling has been shown to play a key role in transferring work experience from more experienced towards novices in a number of vocational educational practices, however previous studies have not to the same extent dealt with the role of students’ own storytelling practices for sensemaking of work experience. This study set out to examine police students’ storytelling of their first occupational experiences from a sensemaking perspective, with an analysis drawing on the concepts of enactment, selection, and retention. The study is based on participant observations of field training follow up sessions’ in the context of police education. Findings indicated that student storytelling of work experience tended to be geared towards action, extremeness and the telling of ‘war stories’. Furthermore, these type of stories functioned to enable student identification, self-enhancement and emotion management. These findings contribute to our current understanding of how students engage in sensemaking of work-based experiences and in extension how knowledge integration and learning from work placements can be structured pedagogically.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer, 2018
Keywords
storytelling, policing, sensemaking, knowledge integration
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139514 (URN)10.1007/s12186-017-9184-9 (DOI)000426597000009 ()
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Haake, U., Rantatalo, O. & Lindberg, O. (2017). Police leaders make poor change agents: leadership practice in the face of a major organisational reform. Policing & society, 27(7), 764-778
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Police leaders make poor change agents: leadership practice in the face of a major organisational reform
2017 (English)In: Policing & society, ISSN 1043-9463, E-ISSN 1477-2728, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 764-778Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present article examines expectations on police leaders during major organisational change pressures. Based on policy analysis and interviews with 28 police leaders, the paper seeks to answer the following question: How do police leaders' accounts of leadership practice relate to expectations from higher ranks (above), subordinates (below) and police policies concerning leadership? The results of the paper indicate that police leaders are squeezed into a position between demands from above (top  management) and demands from below (lower organisational tiers). Some of the perceived expectations and practiced leadership actions are also gendered. For example, women feel the need to prove their credibility as leaders and to act in both a caring and daring manner, something that is not evident for male police leaders. Furthermore, the material indicates a considerable mismatch between the different sets of demands expressed in interviews and expectations regarding leadership expressed in police policy discourse, wherein core values and leadership criteria are articulated. In conclusion, the findings indicate a discrepancy between official rhetoric and practice, where the leadership constructed at a policy level deviates from leadership constructed in practice. This discrepancy is argued to represent an effective barrier for change initiatives, and hence the idea that police leaders will be able to function as agents of change promoting organisational reform is highly uncertain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Police leadership, practice theory, organisational change, gender
National Category
Pedagogy Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110643 (URN)10.1080/10439463.2015.1099653 (DOI)000408914600005 ()
Available from: 2015-10-25 Created: 2015-10-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Kohlström, K., Rantatalo, O., Karp, S. & Padyab, M. (2017). Policy ideals for a reformed education: How police students value new and enduring content in a time of change. Journal of Workplace Learning, 29(7/8), 524-536
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Policy ideals for a reformed education: How police students value new and enduring content in a time of change
2017 (English)In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 29, no 7/8, p. 524-536Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose This study aims to examine how subgroups within a cohort of Swedish police students value different types of curricula content (i.e. new competencies versus enduring ones) in the context of the currently transforming landscape of basic police training.

Design/methodology/approach Drawing on a Swedish national survey (N = 369), the study examined variations in how students value new versus enduring police curricula content based on sociodemographic factors. Specifically, factors such as student age and gender and the institutional arrangements of education were tested using an independent t test.

Findings The study identified differences in values based on gender. Female students valued competencies such as communication, flexibility, diversity and decisiveness as more important in an educational setting than did males. Fewer differences were found in relation to institutional arrangement, and in-house students valued flexibility and communication skill as more important for educational curricula compared to university-based students. No differences were found in relation to age.

Originality/value This study adds knowledge to the question of how changes in occupational education policy develop in practice. More specifically, the study explored how students in educational programmes value new versus enduring competencies and whether differences can be identified based on sociodemographic factors. These questions are important because they expose sociodemographic conditions that influence how students value policy-driven skills versus enduring ones.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Keywords
Gender, Skills, Vocational education, Competencies, Police education, Police student
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131712 (URN)10.1108/JWL-09-2016-0082 (DOI)000416659800003 ()
Available from: 2017-02-19 Created: 2017-02-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sjöberg, D., Karp, S. & Rantatalo, O. (2016). Acting in scenario training as a tool for developing professional knowing in police education. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Police Research Seminar 2016 - (Police) Reforms and Changes in the Police, Oslo, 8-9 September 2016. Linnéuniversitetet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acting in scenario training as a tool for developing professional knowing in police education
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Scenario training is a common and integral part of police education, where students act as police officers in a variety of situations.  When conducting scenario training and in the research on learning via scenario training, a predominant focus has been on the students acting as police officers. However, students may also partake as actors with more periphery tasks as for instance crowd following a scene, but they can also take direct action towards the police for instance as rioters or as perpetrators of violence.  In the research literature, the learning potential of these secondary roles of students in scenario training has been largely overlooked. In this paper we report on a study of police students experiences of acting in scenario training in other roles than as police officers. The approach of the study was explorative using observations of scenario training, a questionnaire and semi structured interviews with police students at Umeå University. Overall the results show that the students value acting in scenarios in other roles than as police officers as an important tool for developing professional knowing. Hence the results have implications both for educational practitioners and for further research on learning in scenario training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linnéuniversitetet, 2016
Series
Nordiska polisforskningsnätverkets nyhetsbrev
Keywords
learning, police, vocational education, simulation, scenario
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125826 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Police Research Seminar 2016 - (Police) Reforms and Changes in the Police, Oslo, 8-9 September 2016
Available from: 2016-09-19 Created: 2016-09-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Rantatalo, O. & Karp, S. (2016). Collective reflection in practice: an ethnographic study of Swedish police training. Reflective Practice, 17(6), 708-723
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collective reflection in practice: an ethnographic study of Swedish police training
2016 (English)In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 708-723Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although reflection has been viewed as an individual process, increased attention has been given to how reflective processes are socially anchored. The present article contributes to this knowledge through an examination of how collective reflection is enacted in the context of police education. The article is based on a one-year ethnographic study of police recruits undergoing training, and the main sources of data collection were participant observations and field interviews. The data were inductively analysed, and a model that differentiates amongst ‘specular’, ‘dialogic’ and ‘polyphonic’ reflection processes is presented. The findings suggest that collective reflection involving multiple individuals adds complexity to reflective processes and that these processes may take on more diverse forms than has been acknowledged, as previous research has mainly focused on dialogic collective reflection. The implications of these findings, such as how increased complexity may counteract the benefits of collective reflection, are also discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
reflection, reflective practice, collective reflection, police training, policing
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124131 (URN)10.1080/14623943.2016.1206881 (DOI)000384681300005 ()
Projects
Framtidens polis - polisers utvecklande av reflexiva förmågor i utbildning och yrkesliv
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-1980
Available from: 2016-07-21 Created: 2016-07-21 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Rantatalo, O. (2016). Media representations and police officers’ identity work in a specialised police tactical unit. Policing & society, 26(1), 97-113
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Media representations and police officers’ identity work in a specialised police tactical unit
2016 (English)In: Policing & society, ISSN 1043-9463, E-ISSN 1477-2728, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 97-113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A growing body of research has highlighted how media representations of policing and contemporary police work are interconnected and influence each other. An under- explored dimension of this relation is how mediated representations of policing transfer meaning to police officers’ sensemaking of their occupational identities. With the aim of advancing knowledge on this issue, the following article reports a case study of a tactical police unit and explores what roles media representations of the unit play in serving police officers’ narrative ‘identity work’ relative to their work and their organisation. Methodologically, the article draws on an analysis of newspaper articles about the studied police unit and interviews with police officers working within the unit. The findings indicate that positively biased representations depicting the unit as heroic and elite had self-enhancing effects on police officers’ identifications, whilst critically oriented media narratives spurred reframing and projection of local counter- images of occupational work identity. These findings add to the present understanding of how the media affect real-life policing, by highlighting how these representations convey meanings to police practice and occupational identification.

Keywords
police identity, media, police-media relations, identity work, specialised policing Introduction
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91809 (URN)10.1080/10439463.2014.942844 (DOI)000366204200006 ()2-s2.0-84949519652 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-08-18 Created: 2014-08-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Rantatalo, O., Stenling, C. & Lindberg, O. (2016). Police bodies and police minds: Occupational socialization through sport. In: Book of Abstracts: . Paper presented at Triennial Conference European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA), September 8-11, Maynooth, Ireland (pp. 80-80).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Police bodies and police minds: Occupational socialization through sport
2016 (English)In: Book of Abstracts, 2016, p. 80-80Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on a study of Swedish police officers’ sport participation as a form of occupational socialisation. Previously, questions of how sport functions as socialisation for work practice has been largely overlooked in the literature. The police are an interesting case, as policing is permeated by ideas of bodily prowess. The study seeks to answer how ideals of work practice are enacted through sport participation and how such socialisation has excluding effects. Using a practice theory framework, the concept of teleoaffective structure guides the analysis. Twelve interviews were conducted with police officers who have experience in police sports and policing. The analysis targeted symbolic manifestations of teleoaffectivity, and the findings indicate five overlapping ideals between sport and police practice. In addition, one police specific ideal was constructed. Based on these findings, we discuss how participation in sport practices subtly shape occupational norms.  

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128368 (URN)
Conference
Triennial Conference European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA), September 8-11, Maynooth, Ireland
Available from: 2016-12-02 Created: 2016-12-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications