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Forsell, Mattias N. E.
Alternative names
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Sundling, C., Ronnberg, C., Yman, V., Asghar, M., Jahnmatz, P., Lakshmikanth, T., . . . Farnert, A. (2019). B cell profiling in malaria reveals expansion and remodeling of CD11c+ B cell subsets. JCI Insight, 4(9), Article ID e126492.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>B cell profiling in malaria reveals expansion and remodeling of CD11c+ B cell subsets
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2019 (English)In: JCI Insight, ISSN 2379-3708, Vol. 4, no 9, article id e126492Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Humoral immunity is important in limiting clinical disease in malaria, yet the longitudinal B cell response to infection remains unclear. We performed a 1-year prospective study in patients treated for acute Plasmodium fakiporum malaria for the first time or with previous exposure to the disease. Using an unbiased exploratory approach with mass cytometry, followed by targeted flow cytometry, we found that approximately 80% of mature B cells that proliferated in response to acute infection expressed CD11c. Only approximately 40% of CD11c+ B cells displayed an atypical B cell phenotype, with the remaining cells primarily made up of activated and resting memory B cells. The CD11c+ B cells expanded rapidly following infection, with previous exposure to malaria resulting in a significantly larger increase compared with individuals with primary infection. This was attributed to an expansion of switched CD11c+ B cells that was absent in primary infected individuals. The rate of contraction of the CD11c+ B cell compartment was independent of previous exposure to malaria and displayed a slow decay, with a half-life of approximately 300 days. Collectively, these results identify CD11c as a marker of B cells responding to malaria and further highlight differences in primary and secondary B cell responses during infection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Clinical Investigation, 2019
National Category
Immunology Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159386 (URN)10.1172/jci.insight.126492 (DOI)000466814100017 ()30939125 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-12 Created: 2019-06-12 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Kolan, S. S., Lidström, T., Mediavilla, T., Dernstedt, A., Degerman, S., Hultdin, M., . . . Forsell, M. N. E. (2019). Growth-inhibition of cell lines derived from B cell lymphomas through antagonism of serotonin receptor signaling. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 4276.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth-inhibition of cell lines derived from B cell lymphomas through antagonism of serotonin receptor signaling
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 4276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A majority of lymphomas are derived from B cells and novel treatments are required to treat refractory disease. Neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine influence activation of B cells and the effects of a selective serotonin 1A receptor (5HT1A) antagonist on growth of a number of B cell-derived lymphoma cell lines were investigated. We confirmed the expression of 5HT1A in human lymphoma tissue and in several well-defined experimental cell lines. We discovered that the pharmacological inhibition of 5HT1A led to the reduced proliferation of B cell-derived lymphoma cell lines together with DNA damage, ROS-independent caspase activation and apoptosis in a large fraction of cells. Residual live cells were found ‘locked’ in a non-proliferative state in which a selective transcriptional and translational shutdown of genes important for cell proliferation and metabolism occurred (e.g., AKT, GSK-3β, cMYC and p53). Strikingly, inhibition of 5HT1A regulated mitochondrial activity through a rapid reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing dehydrogenase activity. Collectively, our data suggest 5HT1A antagonism as a novel adjuvant to established cancer treatment regimens to further inhibit lymphoma growth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157754 (URN)10.1038/s41598-019-40825-x (DOI)000460924100016 ()30862884 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062839295 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
Schrottmaier, W. C., Salzmann, M., Badrnya, S., Morava, S., Luik, A.-L., Kral-Pointner, J. B., . . . Assinger, A. (2019). Platelet-stored antibodies potently diminish viral infection in vitro and in vivo. Paper presented at Joint Meeting of the Federation of European Physiological Societies (FEPS) and the Italian Physiological Society (SIF), Bologna (Italy), 10–13 September, 2019. Acta Physiologica, 227(S718), 187-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Platelet-stored antibodies potently diminish viral infection in vitro and in vivo
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2019 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 227, no S718, p. 187-187Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Besides their primary role in haemostasis, platelets are actively involved in immune responses as they respond to various inflammatory stimuli, including microbial infection. Further, platelets contain intracellular IgG, but their physiologic function remains unknown. Thus, we aimed to elucidate the function of platelet-derived IgGs and their effect on viral infections. Human and murine platelets contained IgG which were released upon shear stress. However, IgG loss did not correlate with P-Selectin exposure or CXCL4 release and α-granule deficient (Nbeal2-/-) platelets failed to show reduced IgG content and release, indicating an extragranular IgG storage site within platelets. While platelet IgG could derive from megakaryocytes that have taken up IgG from the bone marrow microenvironment, naïve platelets also took up IgG directly from plasma in vitro and in vivo. Murine platelets from anti-IAV IgG seropositive mice reduced IAV infection in vitro and in vivo more efficiently than plasma containing comparable IgG levels. Further, human platelets from anti-CMV IgG seropositive but not seronegative donors also potently neutralized in vitro CMV-infection of HUVEC under microvascular shear stress. Our data indicate that IgG storage in platelets may not be restricted to α-granules. Further, our results show that platelets have the potential to mediate potent IgG-mediated antiviral effects both in vitro and in vivo directly at foci of infection. This indicates that platelet-derived IgG may represent a yet unexplored mechanism for focused serological immunity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164632 (URN)10.1111/apha.13366 (DOI)000485252000449 ()
Conference
Joint Meeting of the Federation of European Physiological Societies (FEPS) and the Italian Physiological Society (SIF), Bologna (Italy), 10–13 September, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Waltraud, S., Anna-Liisa, L., Manuel, S., Sigrun, B., Susanne, M., Julia, K.-P., . . . Mattias, F. (2017). Activation of circulating platelets leads to innate-like delivery of potent antiviral antibodies. Paper presented at 44th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), OCT 17-20, 2017, Stockholm, SWEDEN. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, 86(4), 278-278
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activation of circulating platelets leads to innate-like delivery of potent antiviral antibodies
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 278-278Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140894 (URN)000411865200074 ()
Conference
44th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), OCT 17-20, 2017, Stockholm, SWEDEN
Note

Meeting Abstract: A-31335

Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Kolan, S. S., Lidström, T., Björk, K., Hultdin, M. & Forsell, M. (2017). Modulation of lymphoma growth by a selective serotonin receptor antagonist. Paper presented at 44th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), OCT 17-20, 2017, Stockholm, SWEDEN. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, 86(4), 343-343
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modulation of lymphoma growth by a selective serotonin receptor antagonist
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 343-343Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140898 (URN)000411865200222 ()
Conference
44th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), OCT 17-20, 2017, Stockholm, SWEDEN
Note

Meeting Abstract: D-31412

Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Forsell, M. N. E., Kvastad, L., Sedimbi, S. K., Andersson, J. & Karlsson, M. C. I. (2017). Regulation of Subunit-Specific Germinal Center B Cell Responses to the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins by Antibody-Mediated Feedback. Frontiers in Immunology, 8, Article ID 738.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulation of Subunit-Specific Germinal Center B Cell Responses to the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins by Antibody-Mediated Feedback
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2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, article id 738Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The regulation of germinal center (GC) B cell responses to single epitopes is well investigated. How monoclonal B cells are regulated within the polyclonal B cell response to protein antigens is less so. Here, we investigate the primary GC B cell response after injection of mice with HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. We demonstrate that single GCs are seeded by a diverse number of B cell clones shortly after a single immunization and that the presence of Env-specific antibodies can inhibit the development of early GC B cells. Importantly, the suppression was dependent on the GC B cells and the infused antibodies to target the same subunit of the injected HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. An affinity-dependent antibody feedback has previously been shown to regulate GC B cell development. Here, we propose that this antibody-based feedback acts on GC B cells only if they target the same or overlapping epitopes. This study provides important basic information of GC B cell regulation, and for future vaccine designs with aim to elicit neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2017
Keywords
epitope-specific antibodies, regulation of germinal centers, HIV-1, envelope glycoproteins, epitope-specific B cells
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137797 (URN)10.3389/fimmu.2017.00738 (DOI)000404584400001 ()
Available from: 2017-07-27 Created: 2017-07-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Kerkman, P., Tuiskunen-Bäck, A., Dernstedt, A., Wigren, J., Ahlm, C. & Forsell, M. (2017). The B cell response towards Puumala virus infection: can B cells be infected?. Paper presented at 44th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), OCT 17-20, 2017, Stockholm, SWEDEN. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, 86(4), 260-260
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The B cell response towards Puumala virus infection: can B cells be infected?
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 260-260Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140892 (URN)000411865200034 ()
Conference
44th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), OCT 17-20, 2017, Stockholm, SWEDEN
Note

Meeting Abstract: A-31234

Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Oliveira, M., Baptista, M., Keszei, M., Snapper, S., Forsell, M., Thrasher, A., . . . Westerberg, L. (2017). The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates antigen processing and presentation by dendritic cells. Paper presented at 44th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), OCT 17-20, 2017, Stockholm, SWEDEN. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, 86(4), 254-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates antigen processing and presentation by dendritic cells
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 254-255Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140891 (URN)10.1111/sji.12587 (DOI)000411865200021 ()
Conference
44th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian-Society-for-Immunology (SSI), OCT 17-20, 2017, Stockholm, SWEDEN
Note

Meeting Abstract: A-31194

Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Baptista, M. A. P., Keszei, M., Oliveira, M., Sunahara, K. K. S., Andersson, J., Dahlberg, C. I. M., . . . Westerberg, L. S. (2016). Deletion of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells. Nature Communications, 7, Article ID 12175.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deletion of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells
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2016 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 12175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFN gamma-producing CD8(+) T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8(+) T cells at the expense of CD4(+) T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells.

National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125592 (URN)10.1038/ncomms12175 (DOI)000380810700001 ()27425374 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-19 Created: 2016-09-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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