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Nylander, Elisabet
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Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Andersson, N., Preuss, I., Boman, J. & Nylander, E. (2019). Chlamydia Infection Among Digital Daters and Nondigital Daters. Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, 23(3), 230-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chlamydia Infection Among Digital Daters and Nondigital Daters
2019 (English)In: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, ISSN 1089-2591, E-ISSN 1526-0976, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 230-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate whether the use of dating apps is a risk factor for acquiring Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infections.

Methods: Patients attending the drop-in facility at the STI clinic at Umea University Hospital between April 2016 and November 2017 were asked to fill in a survey about their sexual preferences and behaviors, including dating app use.

Results: Of 943 participants, 80 (8.5%) received a CT diagnosis (34 women and 46 men). Dating app users did not seem to have an increased risk of CT infection. Having 3 or more sex partners within the last year was a risk factor for CT only among those not using a dating app. Alcohol use before sex and unprotected sex with a new partner were risk factors for CT infection in the univariate but not in the multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: Dating app users did not seem to have an increased risk of acquiring CT and for dating app users the seemingly well-established risk factor of having many partners was not valid.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
Keywords
Chlamydia trachomatis, risk factor, survey, sexual behavior, dating apps
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161830 (URN)10.1097/LGT.0000000000000483 (DOI)000474336000010 ()31233434 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Boman, J., Lindqvist, H., Forsberg, L., Janlert, U., Granåsen, G. & Nylander, E. (2018). Brief manual-based single-session Motivational Interviewing for reducing high-risk sexual behaviour in women: an evaluation. International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), 29(4), 396-403
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brief manual-based single-session Motivational Interviewing for reducing high-risk sexual behaviour in women: an evaluation
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), ISSN 0956-4624, E-ISSN 1758-1052, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 396-403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate brief Motivational Interviewing (MI) to facilitate behaviour change in women at high risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs). One hundred and seventy-three women (mean age 24.7) at high risk of contracting STIs were randomized to a brief risk-reducing MI counselling intervention (n = 74) or assigned to the control group (n = 99). MI skill was assessed using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) Coding System. Seventeen of 74 (23%) women tested for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) in the MI intervention group and 22 of 99 (22%) in the control group had a genital CT infection 0-24 months before baseline. All additional CT testing was monitored up to 24 months for all 173 women in the study. None of the 49 CT-retested women in the MI group was CT infected, as compared to 3 of 72 (4%) women in the control group. A generalized estimating equations model with sexual high-risk behaviour measured at baseline and at six-month follow-up produced an adjusted estimated odds ratio of 0.38 (95% confidence interval = 0.158, 0.909), indicating efficacy. Brief manual-based single-session MI counselling seems to be effective in reducing high-risk sexual behaviour in women at high risk of acquiring STIs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Chlamydia trachomatis, Europe, Motivational Interviewing, high-risk behaviour, prevention
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Immunology in the medical area Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143247 (URN)10.1177/0956462417729308 (DOI)000424648100012 ()28920542 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, K., Nylander, E., Sjöström, M. & Ebrahimi, M. (2018). Epstein-Barr virus is not detected in mucosal lichen planus. Medicina Oral, 23(5), e560-e563, Article ID 22617.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epstein-Barr virus is not detected in mucosal lichen planus
2018 (English)In: Medicina Oral, ISSN 1698-4447, E-ISSN 1698-6946, Vol. 23, no 5, p. e560-e563, article id 22617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic inflammatory, immunological, mucocutaneous disease can affect skin, genital and oral mucosa. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is the most common noninfectious, chronic inflammatory oral disease affecting 1-2% of the general adult population. World Health Organization (WHO) classifies OLP as a potentially malignant disorder. Epstein Barr virus or human herpesvirus-4, is a member of the herpes virus family and one of the most ubiquitous viruses known to human, infecting approximately 90% of the world's adult population. The virus often infects B lymphocytes resulting in a wide spectrum of mucocutaneous and systemic diseases, ranging from mild lesions to aggressive malignancies. The aim of this study was to investigate expression of the EBV encoded RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 in oral and genital lichen planus and compare results with normal tissues in situ hybridization which is considered the golden standard for detection of EBER.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 68 biopsies, 25 oral LP, 26 genital LP, 10 oral controls and finally 7 genital controls were analysed using situ hybridization.

RESULT: All samples had RNA as shown by the control slide, whereas no case contained neither EBER1 nor EBER2.

CONCLUSIONS: Based on results from our study EBV is not involved in aetiology of lichen planus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Medicina Oral, 2018
Keywords
Mucosal lichen planus, Epstein - Barr virus
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151757 (URN)10.4317/medoral.22617 (DOI)000443304400009 ()30148472 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-13 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Andersson, N., Carré, H., Janlert, U., Boman, J. & Nylander, E. (2018). Gender differences in the well-being of patients diagnosed with Chlamydia trachomatis: a cross-sectional study. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 94(6), 401-405
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender differences in the well-being of patients diagnosed with Chlamydia trachomatis: a cross-sectional study
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2018 (English)In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, ISSN 1368-4973, E-ISSN 1472-3263, Vol. 94, no 6, p. 401-405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: We aimed to investigate how an infection with Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) influenced patients' well-being and whether there were differences due to gender, age or relationship status, in an effort to strengthen preventive measures and provide better healthcare for patients with CT.

Methods: Patients diagnosed with CT in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden, were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their feelings, thoughts and actions after CT diagnosis. The patients were also asked to fill in the validated questionnaires Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. Between February 2015 and January 2017, 128 patients (74 women and 54 men) were included in the study.

Results: After being diagnosed with CT, men were generally less worried than women (P<0.001). Women worried more about not being able to have children (P<0.001) and about having other STIs (P=0.001) than men did. Men felt less angry (P=0.001), less bad (P<0.001), less dirty (P<0.001) and less embarrassed (P=0.011) than women did. Nineteen per cent of men and 48% of women reported symptoms of anxiety. The majority of both men (60%) and women (72%) had a risk consumption of alcohol.

Conclusion: Women and men reacted differently when diagnosed with CT. Women worried more about complications and more often blamed themselves for being infected. Being aware of these gender differences may be important when planning preventive measures and during counselling of CT-infected patients. Persons working with patients with CT must also be aware of the high frequency of harmful alcohol consumption among their patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
Keywords
attitudes, chlamydia infection, chlamydia trachomatis, gender, sexual health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150585 (URN)10.1136/sextrans-2017-053229 (DOI)000443606300006 ()29306870 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, K., Olah, J., Zohori-Zangeneh, R., Nylander, E. & Ebrahimi, M. (2018). Increased expression of p16 in both oral and genital lichen planus. Medicina Oral, 23(4), e449-e453
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased expression of p16 in both oral and genital lichen planus
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2018 (English)In: Medicina Oral, ISSN 1698-4447, E-ISSN 1698-6946, Vol. 23, no 4, p. e449-e453Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Lichen Planus, LP, is an inflammatory disease of possible autoimmune origin affecting mainly oral and genital mucosa and skin. According to the WHO oral LP is considered a potentially malignant disorders. The p16 tumour suppressor protein can act as an inhibitor of cyclin dependent kinases 4 and 6 and thus down regulate cell cycle progression. Since the discovery of p16 several studies have evaluated its expression in various forms of human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression of p16 in oral and genital LP and corresponding healthy mucosa.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 76 cases of oral LP (OLP), 34 cases of genital LP (GLP), 12 cases of healthy oral and 9 cases of healthy genital mucosa were analysed by the use of immunohistochemistry.

RESULTS: Data showed p16 to be highly expressed in both oral and genital LP, higher than in oral (p=0.000), and genital controls (p=0.002).

CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that the over-expression of p16 seen in LP play a part in the histopathology of the disease.

Keywords
p16, inflammation, oral, genital, lichen planus, malignant risk
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150603 (URN)10.4317/medoral.22432 (DOI)000437438600011 ()29924765 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-14 Created: 2018-08-14 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, K., Ebrahimi, M., Nylander, E., Wahlin, Y. B. & Nylander, K. (2017). Alterations in factors involved in differentiation and barrier function in the epithelium in oral and genital lichen planus. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 97(2), 214-218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alterations in factors involved in differentiation and barrier function in the epithelium in oral and genital lichen planus
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2017 (English)In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 214-218Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lichen planus is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease affecting both skin and mucosa, mainly in oral and/or genital regions. Keratinocytes go through a well-regulated process of proliferation and differentiation, alterations in which may result in defects in the protective epithelial barrier. Long-term barrier impairment might lead to chronic inflammation. In order to broaden our understanding of the differentiation process in mucosal lichen planus, we mapped the expression of 4 factors known to be involved in differentiation. Biopsies were collected from oral and genital lichen planus lesions and normal controls. Altered expression of all 4 factors in epithelium from lichen planus lesions was found, clearly indicating disturbed epithelial differentiation in lichen planus lesions.

Keywords
lichen planus, differentiation, epithelial barrier
National Category
Dentistry Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Research subject
Medical Cell Biology; Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125780 (URN)10.2340/00015555-2533 (DOI)000393895500009 ()27599552 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-16 Created: 2016-09-16 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Nylander, E. & Tunback, P. (2017). Commentary on "Phimosis with Preputial Fissures as a Predictor of Undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes in Adults". Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 97(1), 145-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary on "Phimosis with Preputial Fissures as a Predictor of Undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes in Adults"
2017 (English)In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 145-145Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACTA DERMATO-VENEREOLOGICA, 2017
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133377 (URN)10.2340/00015555-2479 (DOI)000393894700038 ()27275650 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Shayesteh, A., Janlert, U. & Nylander, E. (2017). Hyperhidrosis – Sweating Sites Matter: Quality of Life in Primary Hyperhidrosis according to the Sweating Sites Measured by SF-36. Dermatology, 233(6), 441-445
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyperhidrosis – Sweating Sites Matter: Quality of Life in Primary Hyperhidrosis according to the Sweating Sites Measured by SF-36
2017 (English)In: Dermatology, ISSN 1018-8665, E-ISSN 1421-9832, Vol. 233, no 6, p. 441-445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Primary hyperhidrosis has negative impacts on quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the impacts of primary hyperhidrosis on quality of life are different depending on the localisation of the sweating.

METHOD: We compiled background data, Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS), and Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) post hoc results from 2 previous studies. Cases who described only 1 site as their most problematic area of sweating were included (n = 160/188) while individuals with multifocal primary sites of hyperhidrosis were excluded (n = 28/188).

RESULTS: Individuals included were 11-62 years old with a mean age of 30.2 ± 10.4 years, and axillary hyperhidrosis (65.6%) was the most common type of hyperhidrosis. Comorbidities were more common when hyperhidrosis was reported in other than the axillary, palmar, and plantar regions. Excluding comorbidities showed the lowest SF-36 mental component summary scores for axillary (41.6 ± 11.6), palmar (40.0 ± 9.4), and plantar hyperhidrosis (41.1 ± 13.7). The HDSS showed the highest proportion of severe cases in axillary (60.6%) and palmar (51.5%) hyperhidrosis (p < 0.01) while mild cases were more often observed in plantar (60%), facial (83.3%), and other sites (85.7%) in primary hyperhidrosis (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that impairments in quality of life can be different depending on the manifestation of primary hyperhidrosis on the body. This can have an influence on how patients with hyperhidrosis could be prioritised in health care. Subgroup samples affected by facial hyperhidrosis and other sites of primary hyperhidrosis were however small, and more research is required to verify our findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2017
Keywords
Hyperhidrosis, Quality of life, Survey
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145944 (URN)10.1159/000486713 (DOI)000430505800005 ()29502112 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85043695825 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Andersson, N., Boman, J. & Nylander, E. (2017). Rectal chlamydia - should screening be recommended in women?. International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), 28(5), 476-479
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rectal chlamydia - should screening be recommended in women?
2017 (English)In: International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), ISSN 0956-4624, E-ISSN 1758-1052, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 476-479Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in Europe and has large impacts on patients' physical and emotional health. Unidentified asymptomatic rectal Chlamydia trachomatis could be a partial explanation for the high Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence. In this study, we evaluated rectal Chlamydia trachomatis testing in relation to symptoms and sexual habits in women and men who have sex with men. Rectal Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence was 9.1% in women and 0.9% in men who have sex with men. None of the patients reported any rectal symptoms; 59.0% of the women with a rectal Chlamydia trachomatis infection denied anal intercourse and 18.8% did not have a urogenital infection; 9.4% did neither have a urogenital infection nor reported anal sex. We suggest that rectal sampling should be considered in women visiting sexually transmitted infection clinics regardless of rectal symptoms and irrespective of anal intercourse, since our data suggest that several cases of rectal Chlamydia trachomatis otherwise would be missed, thus enabling further disease transmission.

Keywords
Chlamydia trachomatis, screening
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133731 (URN)10.1177/0956462416653510 (DOI)000395743800006 ()27235696 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-05 Created: 2017-05-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gu, X., Boldrup, L., Coates, P. J., Fåhraeus, R., Nylander, E., Loizou, C., . . . Nylander, K. (2016). Epigenetic regulation of OAS2 shows disease-specific DNA methylation profiles at individual CpG sites. Scientific Reports, 6, Article ID 32579.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epigenetic regulation of OAS2 shows disease-specific DNA methylation profiles at individual CpG sites
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 32579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Epigenetic modifications are essential regulators of biological processes. Decreased DNA methylation of OAS2 (2'-5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase 2), encoding an antiviral protein, has been seen in psoriasis. To provide further insight into the epigenetic regulation of OAS2, we performed pyrosequencing to detect OAS2 DNA methylation status at 11 promoter and first exon located CpG sites in psoriasis (n = 12) and two common subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck: tongue (n = 12) and tonsillar (n = 11). Compared to corresponding controls, a general hypomethylation was seen in psoriasis. In tongue and tonsillar SCC, hypomethylation was found at only two CpG sites, the same two sites that were least demethylated in psoriasis. Despite differences in the specific residues targeted for methylation/demethylation, OAS2 expression was upregulated in all conditions and correlations between methylation and expression were seen in psoriasis and tongue SCC. Distinctive methylation status at four successively located CpG sites within a genomic area of 63 bp reveals a delicately integrated epigenetic program and indicates that detailed analysis of individual CpGs provides additional information into the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in specific disease states. Methylation analyses as clinical biomarkers need to be tailored according to disease-specific sites.

Keywords
Tympanic membrane, myringoplasty, perforation, Gelfoam®
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125822 (URN)10.1038/srep32579 (DOI)000391984400001 ()27572959 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-22 Created: 2017-02-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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