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Lundmark, Linda
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Publications (10 of 59) Show all publications
Demiroglu, O. C., Lundmark, L. & Strömgren, M. (2019). Development of downhill skiing tourism in Sweden: past, present, and future. In: Ulrike Pröbstl-Haider, Harold Richins and Stefan Türk (Ed.), Winter tourism: trends and challenges (pp. 305-323). CABI Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of downhill skiing tourism in Sweden: past, present, and future
2019 (English)In: Winter tourism: trends and challenges / [ed] Ulrike Pröbstl-Haider, Harold Richins and Stefan Türk, CABI Publishing, 2019, p. 305-323Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CABI Publishing, 2019
Series
CABI series in tourism management research
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163994 (URN)9781786395207 (ISBN)9781786395214 (ISBN)9781786395221 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-72
Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Lundmark, L. & Åberg, K. G. (2019). How modest tourism development becomes successful: the complementarity of tourism in Malå municipality. In: Rhonda L. Koster and Doris A. Carson (Ed.), Perspectives on rural tourism geographies: case studies from developed nations on the exotic, the fringe and the boring bits in between (pp. 221-241). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How modest tourism development becomes successful: the complementarity of tourism in Malå municipality
2019 (English)In: Perspectives on rural tourism geographies: case studies from developed nations on the exotic, the fringe and the boring bits in between / [ed] Rhonda L. Koster and Doris A. Carson, Springer, 2019, p. 221-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter tells the story of a small inland village in northern Sweden. Historically this area was only home to the Sami population, but with time colonization and the extraction of raw material have changed the conditions radically. This chapter explores the circumstances that have shaped the tourism sector in Malå and discusses how tourism is integrated in the development of the local economy. The geographical location was key to creating wealth from forestry and mining in the past, but this did not create the infrastructure or layers of investments that today are important for economic development in other sectors. However, this study shows that Malå has managed to diversify its historic paths by branching into the new knowledge economy, and the direct dependence on jobs in its primary industry has decreased even though it remains one of several pillars of the local economy. Tourism is seen as a way to further decrease the historic dependence on primary sectors. Municipal officials argue that tourism is to be regarded as a complement and should not be seen as replacing what is already successfully transitioning and developing. Tourism in Malå is predominantly concentrated on the winter season, with weekend return tourists coming mainly from the coastal municipalities. Although it is a major skiing destination in Västerbotten County, second only to Hemavan-Tärnaby in terms of sold ski passes, there are indicators that identification with the traditional resource sectors remains strong among Malå's inhabitants. However, tourism seems to be a successful local development strategy, given its complementarity to other industries and the realistic expectations based on accurate appraisals of existing conditions for development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Geographies of Tourism and Global Change
Keywords
Path dependence, Path creation, Periphery, Regional tourism, Small-scale seasonal tourism, Weekenders
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163096 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-11950-8_12 (DOI)9783030119492 (ISBN)9783030119508 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2019-09-06 Created: 2019-09-06 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
Demiroglu, O. C., Lundmark, L., Müller, D. K. & Tokmakcioglu, K. (2019). Impacts of Climate Change on Second Home Property Values in the Swedish Mountain. In: : . Paper presented at The 8th Nordic Geographers Meeting, June 16-19, 2019, Trondheim, Norway.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impacts of Climate Change on Second Home Property Values in the Swedish Mountain
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Climate change has and will have its impacts on the tourism industry, especially where weather-dependent amenities constitute the key attractions. In this study, our aim is to assess the impacts of climate change on existing and proposed second homes in and around ski resorts in the Swedish mountains, which are determined as among the most attractive locations for such development. It is thought that, along with climate change induced natural disasters and phenomena such as landslides, avalanches, floods and permafrost thaw, property value loss (or gain) is a major climate change impact that needs to be considered in conjunction with the vulnerability of skiing-based second homes and their immediate and wider regions. For this purpose, firstly, corresponding (and lagged) states of the ski climate are treated as estimators for second home sales prices for the 2000-2016 period and, secondly, the quantified relationship is simulated according to future climate projections, based on data available from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. The results are mapped in terms of existing and potential skiing-based second home regions, the latter with a certain focus on the "winners", and according to different representative concentration pathways.

National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165610 (URN)
Conference
The 8th Nordic Geographers Meeting, June 16-19, 2019, Trondheim, Norway
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-72
Available from: 2019-11-29 Created: 2019-11-29 Last updated: 2019-12-02Bibliographically approved
Carson, D. B., Lundmark, L. & Carson, D. A. (2019). The Continuing Advance and Retreat of Rural Settlement in the Northern Inland of Sweden. Journal of Northern Studies, 13(1), 7-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Continuing Advance and Retreat of Rural Settlement in the Northern Inland of Sweden
2019 (English)In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 7-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 1960, a range of leading rural geographers started a debate about population development and the “advance and retreat” of human settlement in sparsely populated rural areas, including in the inland north of Sweden. In what came to be known as the “Siljan Symposium,” they identified a number of key themes in relation to migration and human mobility that were thought to determine settlement patterns in the inland north, including: internal migration and urbanisation of populations; the role of simultaneous in- and out-migration in re-shaping settlement patterns; redistribution of rural populations through return migration and international migration; and changing preferences for settlement in different northern “zones” based on the methods for exploiting natural resources for agriculture, forestry, mining and energy production. This paper re-visits the main themes from the 1960 Siljan Symposium and examines Swedish register data to identify how migration patterns and the resulting “advance and retreat” of human settlement have changed across the inland of Västerbotten and Norrbotten. The results suggest that, while general urban-rural and regional- local settlement patterns appear to have been relatively consistent, new forms of migration (including internal, return and international) with different preferences for rural settlement emerging in different localities as a result of both persistent (mining, forestry, energy) and changing (tourism, lifestyle) values of natural resources. We also observe substantial differences in migration and urbanisation rates between Norrbotten and Västerbotten. The paper then discusses how the persistence and discontinuity of experiences over the past decades may provide insights into the potential future patterns of northern settlement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University & The Royal Skyttean Society, 2019
Keywords
migration, urbanisation, rural settlement, sparsely populated areas, northern Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167168 (URN)
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Demiroglu, O. C., Lundmark, L., Saarinen, J. & Müller, D. K. (2019). The last resort?: Ski tourism and climate change in Arctic Sweden. Journal of Tourism Futures
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The last resort?: Ski tourism and climate change in Arctic Sweden
2019 (English)In: Journal of Tourism Futures, ISSN 2055-5911, E-ISSN 2055-592XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss the external and internal factors that support or challenge a possible transformation of Arctic Sweden into a major ski destination under a changing climate. Design/methodology/approach – The paper questions future availability of the physical and the human factors that foster ski tourism development in Arctic Sweden and suggests a comparative case study in relation to the already existing large resort-based ski destinations in Arctic Finland. Findings – Preliminary documentary analysis shows that the governmental and the industrial discourses over the past decade have acknowledged a competitive edge for Sweden and its northernmost regions in particular and may even propose a structural shift for ski tourism in the near future agenda. The visualisations based on natural snow projections presented in this paper confirm this comparative advantage but other technical and socioeconomic development factors are further discussed, in relation to Arctic Finland. Research limitations/implications – Future research agenda is suggested to cover, first, assessment of natural and technical snow reliability of existing and all potential ski areas in Sweden and within its competitive set extending to all the Nordics and the Alps, then, incorporation of adaptive capacities of the suppliers but especially the likely substitution tendencies of the consumers, and finally, evaluation of the overall situation in terms of the regional development needs. Social implications – It is apparent that land use conflicts will arise in case of large ski resort-based destination development in Arctic Sweden, especially around the environmentally protected areas, which are not only already important attractions for nature-based tourism but also traditional livelihoods for the Sami. Originality/value – This is the first paper to discuss a potential regional and structural shift of ski tourism in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
Keywords
Finland, Climate change, Sweden, Adaptation, Arctic tourism, Ski tourism
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165612 (URN)10.1108/JTF-05-2019-0046 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-72
Available from: 2019-11-29 Created: 2019-11-29 Last updated: 2019-12-02
Hedlund, M., Carson, D. A., Eimermann, M. & Lundmark, L. (2017). Repopulating and revitalising rural Sweden? Re-examining immigration as a solution to rural decline. Geographical Journal, 183(4), 400-413
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repopulating and revitalising rural Sweden? Re-examining immigration as a solution to rural decline
2017 (English)In: Geographical Journal, ISSN 0016-7398, E-ISSN 1475-4959, Vol. 183, no 4, p. 400-413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing international immigration is often portrayed as a potential solution to persistent economic and population decline in rural areas. Based on longitudinal register data, this study examines the extent to which international migration has contributed to demographic and labour market changes in rural Sweden between 1990 and 2010. Results show that the urbanisation rate of international migrants is very high while their employment rate in rural areas remains comparatively low. Small positive changes are noticeable in the rate of higher education, self-employment and employment in new service-related industries among particular groups of immigrants. Immigrants to rural areas are a highly heterogeneous group in terms of their demographic and labour market characteristics, which should be considered when estimating the contributions of immigration to socio-economic development in rural areas. This study shows that, while international migration may dampen population decline in rural areas to some extent, particularly in the working-age groups, its potential to stimulate socio-economic revitalisation in rural areas needs to be questioned and examined from a more nuanced and longitudinal perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
international migration, rural decline, demographic change, labour market change
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138919 (URN)10.1111/geoj.12227 (DOI)000414464300008 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-72
Available from: 2017-09-03 Created: 2017-09-03 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Hedlund, M., Lundmark, L. & Stjernström, O. (2017). Rural restructuring and gendered micro-dynamics of the agricultural labour market. Fennia, 195(1), 25-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rural restructuring and gendered micro-dynamics of the agricultural labour market
2017 (English)In: Fennia, ISSN 0015-0010, Vol. 195, no 1, p. 25-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Based on a comparison of the employment trajectories of two cohorts of men and women in the agricultural sector in Sweden, this article gives an account of the past 50 years’ decline in employment in agriculture. The findings show that the decline of employment in agriculture was the result of fewer entries into the sector and more exits out of the sector. The findings also suggest that the restructuring of the agricultural sector has had greater effects on women than men, with women exiting the sector to a greater degree or never entering it to begin with.

Keywords
agricultural decline, rural restructuring, off-farm employment, lifecourse perspective, Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133595 (URN)10.11143/fennia.59542 (DOI)000406431800003 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-72
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Keskitalo, E. C., Karlsson, S., Lindgren, U., Pettersson, Ö., Lundmark, L., Slee, B., . . . Feliciano, D. (2017). Rural-urban policies: changing conceptions of the human-environment relationship. In: E. Carina H. Keskitalo (Ed.), Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition (pp. 183-224). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rural-urban policies: changing conceptions of the human-environment relationship
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2017 (English)In: Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 183-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter describes how understandings of the "rural" have progressed from a focus on either decline or amenity, whereby these more simplified understandings can be seen to have had an impact on rural policy development. The chapter argues that rural areas, including forests, need to be understood in relation to both production and integration with urban landscapes. It thus illustrates the role of both historical processes and policy in creating current understandings of the rural: drawing upon an example from the Swedish case, it amongst others shows that a redistributive tax system has played a larger and more crucial role than rural policy in retaining active rural areas in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143483 (URN)10.1057/978-1-137-57116-8_6 (DOI)881251 (Local ID)978-1-137-57115-1 (ISBN)978-1-137-57116-8 (ISBN)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Projects
PLURAL Planning for rural-urban dynamics: living and acting at several places
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Lundmark, L., Ednarsson, M. & Karlsson, S. (2016). International migration, self-employment and restructuring through tourism in sparsely populated areas. In: Doris A. Carson, Dean B. Carson and Linda Lundmark (Ed.), Tourism, mobilities, and development in sparsely populated areas: (pp. 70-88). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International migration, self-employment and restructuring through tourism in sparsely populated areas
2016 (English)In: Tourism, mobilities, and development in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Doris A. Carson, Dean B. Carson and Linda Lundmark, Routledge, 2016, p. 70-88Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131081 (URN)881251 (Local ID)9781138955882 (ISBN)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Note

Originally published in Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism (2014), 14 (4), pp. 422-440

Available from: 2017-02-06 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Pashkevich, A., Stjernström, O. & Lundmark, L. (2016). Nature-based tourism, conservation and institutional governance: a case study from the Russian Arctic. The Polar Journal, 6(1), 112-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nature-based tourism, conservation and institutional governance: a case study from the Russian Arctic
2016 (English)In: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 112-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper analyses current institutional arrangements connected to the protection of natural resources in developing nature-based tourism in the territories of the north-western part of the Russian Arctic. Examples from two regions, the Arkhangelsk Oblast and the Nenets Autonomous Okrug, illustrate how the different methods of nature conservation – national parks and nature reserves – are promoting or constraining the development of nature-based tourism activities. The study is based on 14 semi-structured interviews with representatives from state organisations as well as representatives from non-governmental organisations, and reviews of planning and policy documents. This paper discusses the factors shaping present institutional arrangements connected to environmental protection and the capability to establish planning schemes. The agencies responsible for nature-based tourism development often suffer from rudimentary tourism planning, inadequate tourism infrastructure and a lack of service management skills. In addition, there is evidence that mistrust and a lack of collaboration among governmental agencies and private stakeholders also limit development opportunities. Despite the difficulties experienced by authorities responsible for the measures of conservation and nature protection in the remote Arctic territories (Nenetsky State Nature Reserve), pockets of success are identifiable (e.g. Kenozersky National Park). The reality of the nature conservation efforts and the ability to develop nature-based activities is heavily dependent on individual engagement and interpersonal collaboration, which makes the best practices non-transferable to other contexts. So far, the current system of institutional governance limits the possibilities to increase the economic impact of nature-based tourism in the Russian Arctic.

Keywords
Russian Arctic, nature-based tourism, Arkhangelsk Oblast, Nenets Autonomous Okrug, national park, nature reserve
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125770 (URN)10.1080/2154896X.2016.1171000 (DOI)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
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