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Andersson, Agneta
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Publications (10 of 104) Show all publications
Bidleman, T., Andersson, A., Jantunen, L. M., Kucklick, J. R., Kylin, H., Letcher, R. J., . . . Wong, F. (2019). A review of halogenated natural products in Arctic, Subarctic and Nordic ecosystems. Emerging Contaminants, 5, 89-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of halogenated natural products in Arctic, Subarctic and Nordic ecosystems
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2019 (English)In: Emerging Contaminants, ISSN 2405-6650, E-ISSN 2405-6642, Vol. 5, p. 89-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Halogenated natural products (HNPs) are organic compounds containing bromine, chlorine, iodine, and rarely fluorine. HNPs comprise many classes of compounds, ranging in complexity from halocarbons to higher molecular weight compounds, which often contain oxygen and/or nitrogen atoms in addition to halogens. Many HNPs are biosynthesized by marine bacteria, macroalgae, phytoplankton, tunicates, corals, worms, sponges and other invertebrates. This paper reviews HNPs in Arctic, Subarctic and Nordic ecosystems and is based on sections of Chapter 2.16 in the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) assessment Chemicals of Emerging Arctic Concern (AMAP, 2017) which deal with the higher molecular weight HNPs. Material is updated and expanded to include more Nordic examples. Much of the chapter is devoted to “bromophenolic” HNPs, viz bromophenols (BPs) and transformation products bromoanisoles (BAs), hydroxylated and methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers (OH-BDEs, MeO-BDEs) and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs), since these HNPs are most frequently reported. Others discussed are 2,2′ -dimethoxy-3,3′ ,5,5′ -tetrabromobiphenyl (2,2′ -dimethoxy-BB80), polyhalogenated 1′- methyl-1,2′-bipyrroles (PMBPs), polyhalogenated 1,1′ -dimethyl-2,2′ -bipyrroles (PDBPs), polyhalogenated N-methylpyrroles (PMPs), polyhalogenated N-methylindoles (PMIs), bromoheptyl- and bromooctyl pyrroles, (1R,2S,4R,5R,1′E)-2-bromo-1-bromomethyl-1,4-dichloro-5-(2′-chloroethenyl)-5- methylcyclohexane (mixed halogenated compound MHC-1), polybrominated hexahydroxanthene derivatives (PBHDs) and polyhalogenated carbazoles (PHCs). Aspects of HNPs covered are physicochemical properties, sources and production, transformation processes, concentrations and trends in the physical environment and biota (marine and freshwater). Toxic properties of some HNPs and a discussion of how climate change might affect HNPs production and distribution are also included. The review concludes with a summary of research needs to better understand the role of HNPs as “chemicals of emerging Arctic concern”.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Halogenated natural products (HNPs), Arctic, Scandinavia, Baltic Sea, Air, Water, Sediment, Biota, Physicochemical properties
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157149 (URN)10.1016/j.emcon.2019.02.007 (DOI)
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Bidleman, T. F., Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Ericson, L., Haglund, P., Kupryianchyk, D., . . . Tysklind, M. (2019). Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions. Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, 881-892
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, p. 881-892Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine macroalgae are used worldwide for human consumption, animal feed, cosmetics and agriculture. In addition to beneficial nutrients, macroalgae contain halogenated natural products (HNPs), some of which have toxic properties similar to those of well-known anthropogenic contaminants. Sixteen species of red, green and brown macroalgae were collected in 2017–2018 from coastal waters of the northern Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic and Norway Atlantic, and analyzed for bromoanisoles (BAs) and methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers (MeO-BDEs). Target compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-low resolution mass spectrometry (GC-LRMS), with qualitative confirmation in selected species by GC-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Quantified compounds were 2,4-diBA, 2,4,6-triBA, 2′-MeO-BDE68, 6-MeO-BDE47, and two tribromo-MeO-BDEs and one tetrabromo-MeO-BDE with unknown bromine substituent positions. Semiquantitative results for pentabromo-MeO-BDEs were also obtained for a few species by GC-HRMS. Three extraction methods were compared; soaking in methanol, soaking in methanol–dichloromethane, and blending with mixed solvents. Extraction yields of BAs did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) with the three methods and the two soaking methods gave equivalent yields of MeO-BDEs. Extraction efficiencies of MeO-BDEs were significantly lower using the blend method (p < 0.05). For reasons of simplicity and efficiency, the soaking methods are preferred. Concentrations varied by orders of magnitude among species: ∑2BAs 57 to 57 700 and ∑5MeO-BDEs < 10 to 476 pg g−1 wet weight (ww). Macroalgae standing out with ∑2BAs >1000 pg g−1 ww were Ascophyllum nodosumCeramium tenuicorneCeramium virgatumFucus radicansFucus serratusFucus vesiculosusSaccharina latissimaLaminaria digitata, and Acrosiphonia/Spongomorpha sp. Species A. nodosumC. tenuicorneChara virgataF. radicans and F. vesiculosus (Sweden Atlantic only) had ∑5MeO-BDEs >100 pg g−1ww. Profiles of individual compounds showed distinct differences among species and locations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
Keywords
bromoanisoles, methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers, halogenated natural products, macroalgae, Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic, Norway Atlantic
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158517 (URN)10.1039/C9EM00042A (DOI)000468787800009 ()31032511 (PubMedID)
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Ejsmond, M. J., Blackburn, N., Fridolfsson, E., Haecky, P., Andersson, A., Casini, M., . . . Hylander, S. (2019). Modeling vitamin B1 transfer to consumers in the aquatic food web. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 10045.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling vitamin B1 transfer to consumers in the aquatic food web
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 10045Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vitamin B-1 is an essential exogenous micronutrient for animals. Mass death and reproductive failure in top aquatic consumers caused by vitamin B-1 deficiency is an emerging conservation issue in Northern hemisphere aquatic ecosystems. We present for the first time a model that identifies conditions responsible for the constrained flow of vitamin B-1 from unicellular organisms to planktivorous fishes. The flow of vitamin B-1 through the food web is constrained under anthropogenic pressures of increased nutrient input and, driven by climatic change, increased light attenuation by dissolved substances transported to marine coastal systems. Fishing pressure on piscivorous fish, through increased abundance of planktivorous fish that overexploit mesozooplankton, may further constrain vitamin B-1 flow from producers to consumers. We also found that key ecological contributors to the constrained flow of vitamin B-1 are a low mesozooplankton biomass, picoalgae prevailing among primary producers and low fluctuations of population numbers of planktonic organisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161821 (URN)10.1038/s41598-019-46422-2 (DOI)000474820900024 ()31296876 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Harvey, E. T., Walve, J., Andersson, A., Karlson, B. & Kratzer, S. (2019). The Effect of Optical Properties on Secchi Depth and Implications for Eutrophication Management. Frontiers in Marine Science, 5, 1-19, Article ID 496.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Optical Properties on Secchi Depth and Implications for Eutrophication Management
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 5, p. 1-19, article id 496Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Successful management of coastal environments requires reliable monitoring methods and indicators. Besides Chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a), water transparency measured as Secchi Depth (ZSD) is widely used in Baltic Sea management for water quality assessment as eutrophication indicator. However, in many coastal waters not only phytoplankton but also coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) influence the under-water light field, and therefore the ZSD. In this study all three main optical variables(CDOM, Chl-a and SPM [organic and inorganic]) as well as ZSD were measured in three Swedish regions: the Bothnian Sea, the Baltic Proper and the Skagerrak in 2010-2014. Regional multiple regressions with Chl-a, CDOM and inorganic SPM as predictors explained the variations in ZSD well (R2adj = 0.53-0.84). Commonality analyses of the regressions indicated considerable differences between regions regarding the contribution of each factor to the variance, R2adj, in ZSD. CDOM explained most of the variance in the Bothnian Sea and the Skagerrak; in general, Chl-a contributed only modestly to the ZSD. In the Baltic Proper the largest contribution was from the interaction of all three variables. As expected, the link between Chl-a and ZSD was much weaker in the Bothnian Sea with high CDOM absorption and SPM concentration. When applying the Swedish EU Water Framework Directive threshold for Good/Moderate Chl-a status in the models it was shown that ZSD is neither a sufficient indicator for eutrophication, nor for changes in Chl-a. Natural coastal gradients in CDOM and SPM influence the reference conditions for ZSD and other eutrophication indicators, such as the depth distribution of macro-algae. Hence, setting targets for these indicators based on reference Chl-a concentrations and simple Chl-a to ZSD relationships might in some cases be inappropriate and misleading due to overestimation of water transparency under natural conditions.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158247 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2018.00496 (DOI)2-s2.0-85059739363 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-17 Created: 2019-04-17 Last updated: 2019-04-18Bibliographically approved
Bartels, P., Ask, J., Andersson, A., Karlsson, J. & Giesler, R. (2018). Allochthonous Organic Matter Supports Benthic but Not Pelagic Food Webs in Shallow Coastal Ecosystems. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 21(7), 1459-1470
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allochthonous Organic Matter Supports Benthic but Not Pelagic Food Webs in Shallow Coastal Ecosystems
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2018 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 1459-1470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rivers transport large amounts of allochthonous organic matter (OM) to the ocean every year, but there are still fundamental gaps in how allochthonous OM is processed in the marine environment. Here, we estimated the relative contribution of allochthonous OM (allochthony) to the biomass of benthic and pelagic consumers in a shallow coastal ecosystem in the northern Baltic Sea. We used deuterium as a tracer of allochthony and assessed both temporal variation (monthly from May to August) and spatial variation (within and outside river plume). We found variability in allochthony in space and time and across species, with overall higher values for zoobenthos (26.2 +/- 20.9%) than for zooplankton (0.8 +/- 0.3%). Zooplankton allochthony was highest in May and very low during the other months, likely as a result of high inputs of allochthonous OM during the spring flood that fueled the pelagic food chain for a short period. In contrast, zoobenthos allochthony was only lower in June and remained high during the other months. Allochthony of zoobenthos was generally higher close to the river mouth than outside of the river plume, whereas it did not vary spatially for zooplankton. Last, zoobenthos allochthony was higher in deeper than in shallower areas, indicating that allochthonous OM might be more important when autochthonous resources are limited. Our results suggest that climate change predictions of increasing inputs of allochthonous OM to coastal ecosystems may affect basal energy sources supporting coastal food webs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
climate change, terrestrial organic carbon, stable isotope analysis, autochthonous production, benthic-pelagic coupling, food webs, Bothnian Sea
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153548 (URN)10.1007/s10021-018-0233-5 (DOI)000448816300015 ()
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Villafane, V. E., Paczkowska, J., Andersson, A., Duran Romero, C., Valinas, M. S. & Walter Helbling, E. (2018). Dual role of DOM in a scenario of global change on photosynthesis and structure of coastal phytoplankton from the South Atlantic Ocean. Science of the Total Environment, 634, 1352-1361
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dual role of DOM in a scenario of global change on photosynthesis and structure of coastal phytoplankton from the South Atlantic Ocean
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2018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 634, p. 1352-1361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We evaluated the dual role of DOM (i.e., as a source of inorganic nutrients and as an absorber of solar radiation) on a phytoplankton community of the western South Atlantic Ocean. Using a combination of microcosms and a cluster approach, we simulated the future conditions of some variables that are highly influenced by global change in the region. We increased nutrients (i.e., anthropogenic input) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), and we decreased the pH, to assess their combined impact on growth rates (mu), species composition/abundance and size structure, and photosynthesis (considering in this later also the effects of light quality i.e., with andwithout ultraviolet radiation). We simulated two Future conditions (Fut) where nutrients and pHwere similarly manipulated, but in one the physical role of DOM (Fut(out)) was assessed whereas in the other (Fut(in)) the physicochemical role was evaluated; these conditions were compared with a control (Present condition, Pres). The mu significantly increased in both Fut conditions as compared to the Pres, probably due to the nutrient addition and acidification in the former. The highest mu were observed in the Fut(out), due to the growth of nanoplanktonic flagellates and diatoms. Cells in the Fut(in) were photosynthetically less efficient as compared to those of the Fut(out) and Pres, but these physiological differences, also between samples with or without solar UVR observed at the beginning of the experiment, decreased with time hinting for an acclimation process. The knowledge of the relative importance of both roles of DOM is especially important for coastal areas that are expected to receive higher inputs and will be more acidified in the future.

Keywords
Acidification, Dissolved organic matter, Nutrients, Oxygen evolution, Photosynthesis, Ultraviolet diation
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150166 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.04.121 (DOI)000433153600139 ()29710635 (PubMedID)
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2018-07-18 Created: 2018-07-18 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Rodríguez, J., Gallampois, C., Timonen, S., Andersson, A., Sinkko, H., Haglund, P., . . . Rowe, O. (2018). Effects of Organic Pollutants on Bacterial Communities Under Future Climate Change Scenarios. Frontiers in Microbiology, 9, Article ID 2926.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Organic Pollutants on Bacterial Communities Under Future Climate Change Scenarios
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 2926Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coastal ecosystems are highly dynamic and can be strongly influenced by climate change, anthropogenic activities (e.g. pollution) and a combination of the two pressures. As a result of climate change, the northern hemisphere is predicted to undergo an increased precipitation regime, leading in turn to higher terrestrial runoff and increased river inflow. This increased runoff will transfer terrestrial dissolved organic matter (tDOM) and anthropogenic contaminants to coastal waters. Such changes can directly influence the resident biology, particularly at the base of the food web, and can influence the partitioning of contaminants and thus their potential impact on the food web. Bacteria have been shown to respond to high tDOM concentration and organic pollutants loads, and could represent the entry of some pollutants into coastal food webs. We carried out a mesocosm experiment to determine the effects of: 1) increased tDOM concentration, 2) organic pollutant exposure, and 3) the combined effect of these two factors, on pelagic bacterial communities. This study showed significant responses in bacterial community composition under the three environmental perturbations tested. The addition of tDOM increased bacterial activity and diversity, while the addition of organic pollutants led to an overall reduction of these parameters, particularly under concurrent elevated tDOM concentration. Furthermore, we identified 33 bacterial taxa contributing to the significant differences observed in community composition, as well as 35 bacterial taxa which responded differently to extended exposure to organic pollutants. These findings point to the potential impact of organic pollutants under future climate change conditions on the basal coastal ecosystem, as well as to the potential utility of natural bacterial communities as efficient indicators of environmental disturbance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
bacterial community composition, organic pollutants, dissolved organic matter, climate change, Baltic Sea, metagenomics
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153774 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2018.02926 (DOI)000451904500001 ()30555447 (PubMedID)
Projects
ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Degerman, R., Lefébure, R., Byström, P., Båmstedt, U., Larsson, S. & Andersson, A. (2018). Food web interactions determine energy transfer efficiency and top consumer responses to inputs of dissolved organic carbon. Hydrobiologia, 805(1), 131-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food web interactions determine energy transfer efficiency and top consumer responses to inputs of dissolved organic carbon
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2018 (English)In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 805, no 1, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change projections indicate increased precipitation in northern Europe, leading to increased inflow of allochthonous organic matter to aquatic systems. The food web responses are poorly known, and may differ depending on the trophic structure. We performed an experimental mesocosm study where effects of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on two different pelagic food webs were investigated, one having zooplankton as highest trophic level and the other with planktivorous fish as top consumer. In both food webs, DOC caused higher bacterial production and lower food web efficiency, i.e., energy transfer efficiency from the base to the top of the food web. However, the top-level response to DOC addition differed in the zooplankton and the fish systems. The zooplankton production increased due to efficient channeling of energy via both the bacteria land the phytoplankton pathway, while the fish production decreased due to channeling of energy mainly via the longer and less efficient bacterial pathway. We conclude that the added DOC either acted as a subsidy by increasing the production of the top trophic level (mesozooplankton), or as a sink causing decreased top consumer production (planktivorous fish).

Keywords
Food web efficiency, Carbon transfer, Allochthonous dissolved organic carbon, Mesocosm, Planktivorous fish
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102789 (URN)10.1007/s10750-017-3298-9 (DOI)
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Note

Originally published in manuscript form with title Food web interactions determine transfer efficiency and top consumer responses to increased allochthonous carbon input

Available from: 2015-05-05 Created: 2015-05-05 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Creed, I. F., Bergström, A.-K., Trick, C. G., Grimm, N. B., Hessen, D. O., Karlsson, J., . . . Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2018). Global change-driven effects on dissolved organic matter composition: Implications for food webs of northern lakes. Global Change Biology, 24(8), 3692-3714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global change-driven effects on dissolved organic matter composition: Implications for food webs of northern lakes
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2018 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3692-3714Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Northern ecosystems are experiencing some of the most dramatic impacts of global change on Earth. Rising temperatures, hydrological intensification, changes in atmospheric acid deposition and associated acidification recovery, and changes in vegetative cover are resulting in fundamental changes in terrestrial-aquatic biogeochemical linkages. The effects of global change are readily observed in alterations in the supply of dissolved organic matter (DOM)-the messenger between terrestrial and lake ecosystems-with potentially profound effects on the structure and function of lakes. Northern terrestrial ecosystems contain substantial stores of organic matter and filter or funnel DOM, affecting the timing and magnitude of DOM delivery to surface waters. This terrestrial DOM is processed in streams, rivers, and lakes, ultimately shifting its composition, stoichiometry, and bioavailability. Here, we explore the potential consequences of these global change-driven effects for lake food webs at northern latitudes. Notably, we provide evidence that increased allochthonous DOM supply to lakes is overwhelming increased autochthonous DOM supply that potentially results from earlier ice-out and a longer growing season. Furthermore, we assess the potential implications of this shift for the nutritional quality of autotrophs in terms of their stoichiometry, fatty acid composition, toxin production, and methylmercury concentration, and therefore, contaminant transfer through the food web. We conclude that global change in northern regions leads not only to reduced primary productivity but also to nutritionally poorer lake food webs, with discernible consequences for the trophic web to fish and humans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
atmospheric change, cyanobacteria, dissolved organic matter, food webs, lake, mercury, northern
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150465 (URN)10.1111/gcb.14129 (DOI)000437284700035 ()29543363 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, AKB 2010-4675Swedish Research Council, RG 2013-5001
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Paczkowska, J., Rowe, O. F., Figueroa, D., Kratzer, S. & Legrand, C. (2018). Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on pelagic basal production in a northerly estuary. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 204, 225-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on pelagic basal production in a northerly estuary
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2018 (English)In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 204, p. 225-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria are key groups at the base of aquatic food webs. In estuaries receiving riverine water with a high content of coloured allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM), phytoplankton primary production may be reduced, while bacterial production is favoured. We tested this hypothesis by performing a field study in a northerly estuary receiving nutrient-poor, ADOM-rich riverine water, and analyzing results using multivariate statistics. Throughout the productive season, and especially during the spring river flush, the production and growth rate of heterotrophic bacteria were stimulated by the riverine inflow of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In contrast, primary production and photosynthetic efficiency (i.e. phytoplankton growth rate) were negatively affected by DOC. Primary production related positively to phosphorus, which is the limiting nutrient in the area. In the upper estuary where DOC concentrations were the highest, the heterotrophic bacterial production constituted almost 100% of the basal production (sum of primary and bacterial production) during spring, while during summer the primary and bacterial production were approximately equal. Our study shows that riverine DOC had a strong negative influence on coastal phytoplankton production, likely due to light attenuation. On the other hand DOC showed a positive influence on bacterial production since it represents a supplementary food source. Thus, in boreal regions where climate change will cause increased river inflow to coastal waters, the balance between phytoplankton and bacterial production is likely to be changed, favouring bacteria. The pelagic food web structure and overall productivity will in turn be altered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Primary and bacterial production, Coastal areas, Estuary, Allochthonous dissolved organic matter, Northern Baltic Sea
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147287 (URN)10.1016/j.ecss.2018.02.032 (DOI)000429757300020 ()
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
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