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Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Law, S. R. (2019). Differences in pH influence the fate of CO2 in plants. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 165(3), 445-447
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in pH influence the fate of CO2 in plants
2019 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 165, no 3, p. 445-447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Soils represent the largest and most stable carbon pools on Earth, exceeding even the carbon aggregate found in the atmosphere and global phytomass. However, our understanding of how CO2 travels from the soil to the atmosphere, and the role of plants in this journey, is not fully understood. An article in this issue of Physiologia Plantarum (Shimono et al. 2019) sheds light on this process and unearths the dramatic effect pH can have on the fate of CO2 in plants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157197 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12924 (DOI)000459312400001 ()30788844 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
Law, S. R. (2019). Eucalypt seedlings are aided by phosphorus in the face of drought. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 166(4), 892-893
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eucalypt seedlings are aided by phosphorus in the face of drought
2019 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 166, no 4, p. 892-893Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Drought is an increasingly common climatic event that can devastate ecosystems, as well as surrounding agricultural and forestry industries. Few places face this challenge more than Australia, where millennia of droughts linked to geography and climatic drivers, such as El Niño, have shaped the flora and fauna into forms predicated on resilience and economy. How an organism responds to these cyclic challenges is a combination of the inherent tolerance mechanisms encoded in their genome and outside influences, such as the effect of nutrients and symbiotic interactions. In this issue of Physiologia Plantarum, Tariq et al. (2019) describes how the presence of the element phosphorus can bolster the physiological and biochemical response of eucalypt seedlings to severe drought conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161879 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12999 (DOI)000475405000001 ()31294874 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069003645 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Sylvestre-Gonon, E., Law, S. R., Schwartz, M., Robe, K., Keech, O., Didierjean, C., . . . Hecker, A. (2019). Functional, Structural and Biochemical Features of Plant Serinyl-Glutathione Transferases. Frontiers in Plant Science, 10, Article ID 608.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional, Structural and Biochemical Features of Plant Serinyl-Glutathione Transferases
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 10, article id 608Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Glutathione transferases (GSTs) belong to a ubiquitous multigenic family of enzymes involved in diverse biological processes including xenobiotic detoxification and secondary metabolism. A canonical GST is formed by two domains, the N-terminal one adopting a thioredoxin (TRX) fold and the C-terminal one an all-helical structure. The most recent genomic and phylogenetic analysis based on this domain organization allowed the classification of the GST family into 14 classes in terrestrial plants. These GSTs are further distinguished based on the presence of the ancestral cysteine (Cys-GSTs) present in TRX family proteins or on its substitution by a serine (Ser-GSTs). Cys-GSTs catalyze the reduction of dehydroascorbate and deglutathionylation reactions whereas Ser-GSTs catalyze glutathione conjugation reactions and eventually have peroxidase activity, both activities being important for stress tolerance or herbicide detoxification. Through non-catalytic, so-called ligandin properties, numerous plant GSTs also participate in the binding and transport of small heterocyclic ligands such as flavonoids including anthocyanins, and polyphenols. So far, this function has likely been underestimated compared to the other documented roles of GSTs. In this review, we compiled data concerning the known enzymatic and structural properties as well as the biochemical and physiological functions associated to plant GSTs having a conserved serine in their active site.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
photosynthetic organisms, phylogeny, structure, glutathione transferases, ligandin property, secondary metabolism, xenobiotic detoxification
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159853 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2019.00608 (DOI)000468726200001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-4688The Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Law, S. R. (2019). New tools for engineering tomorrow's forests. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 165(4), 671-672
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New tools for engineering tomorrow's forests
2019 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 165, no 4, p. 671-672Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

It is difficult to overstate the role of wood in the story of humanity. In times that predate recorded history it provided shelter from the elements, light and warmth when burned, and a supple material with which early humans could craft their first tools. Today, it is still one of our chief building materials and an emerging industry is extending its applications through the development of novel biomaterials, such as cellulose fiber-derived nanocomposites. An article in this issue of Physiologia Plantarum (Johnsson et al. 2019) describes the influence the phytohormones auxin and gibberellic acid (GA) have on the process of wood formation, and reveals possible targets for optimizing cell wall properties in fiber cells.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158582 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12939 (DOI)000464352400001 ()30919994 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Law, S. R. (2019). The genetic program at the root of the biological stock exchange. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 166(3), 709-711
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The genetic program at the root of the biological stock exchange
2019 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 166, no 3, p. 709-711Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Beneath the gardens, farmlands and forest floors that surround us, a hidden world blooms in careful cooperation and intense competition. The mutualistic symbiosis of the thread-like hyphae of fungi and plant roots (collectively termed mycorrhizae from the Greek mykes - meaning 'fungus', and rhiza - for 'root') is present in the vast majority of plant species. As with most intimate relationships, this symbiosis functions on a principle of 'give and take'. As an autotroph, the plant is able to synthesize all the sugars it requires through photosynthesis; however, its immobility hinders its capacity to forage for nutrients vital for its growth and survival. With an expansive network of hyphae, the heterotrophic fungus is able to locate and remobilize water and nutrients, such as phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), and barter them for precious sugars with the plant. An article in this issue of Physiologia Plantarum (Zhao et al. 2019) describes alterations in the genetic programming that takes place in the plant root upon the establishment of this fascinating relationship, which has profound implications for plant productivity and soil management methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
National Category
Ecology Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161502 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12980 (DOI)000472216000001 ()31215061 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-07-12 Created: 2019-07-12 Last updated: 2019-07-12Bibliographically approved
Law, S. R., Chrobok, D., Juvany, M., Delhomme, N., Lindén, P., Brouwer, B., . . . Keech, O. (2018). Darkened leaves use different metabolic strategies for senescence and survival. Plant Physiology, 177(1), 132-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Darkened leaves use different metabolic strategies for senescence and survival
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2018 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 132-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In plants, an individually darkened leaf initiates senescence much more rapidly than a leaf from a whole darkened plant. Combining transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we present an overview of the metabolic strategies that are employed in response to different darkening treatments. Under darkened plant conditions, the perception of carbon starvation drove a profound metabolic readjustment in which branched-chain amino acids and potentially monosaccharides released from cell wall loosening became important substrates for maintaining minimal ATP production. Concomitantly, the increased accumulation of amino acids with a high nitrogen-carbon ratio may provide a safety mechanism for the storage of metabolically derived cytotoxic ammonium and a pool of nitrogen for use upon returning to typical growth conditions. Conversely, in individually darkened leaf, the metabolic profiling that followed our 13C-enrichment assays revealed a temporal and differential exchange of metabolites, including sugars and amino acids, between the darkened leaf and the rest of the plant. This active transport could be the basis for a progressive metabolic shift in the substrates fueling mitochondrial activities, which are central to the catabolic reactions facilitating the retrieval of nutrients from the senescing leaf. We propose a model illustrating the specific metabolic strategies employed by leaves in response to these two darkening treatments, which support either rapid senescence or a strong capacity for survival.

Keywords
Arabidopsis thaliana, senescence, metabolism, dark induced senescence, survival
National Category
Botany
Research subject
biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147675 (URN)10.1104/pp.18.00062 (DOI)000431347500015 ()29523713 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Chrobok, D., Law, S. R., Brouwer, B., Linden, P., Ziolkowska, A., Liebsch, D., . . . Keech, O. (2016). Dissecting the Metabolic Role of Mitochondria during Developmental Leaf Senescence. Plant Physiology, 172(4), 2132-2153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dissecting the Metabolic Role of Mitochondria during Developmental Leaf Senescence
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2016 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 172, no 4, p. 2132-2153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The functions of mitochondria during leaf senescence, a type of programmed cell death aimed at the massive retrieval of nutrients from the senescing organ to the rest of the plant, remain elusive. Here, combining experimental and analytical approaches, we showed that mitochondrial integrity in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is conserved until the latest stages of leaf senescence, while their number drops by 30%. Adenylate phosphorylation state assays and mitochondrial respiratory measurements indicated that the leaf energy status also is maintained during this time period. Furthermore, after establishing a curated list of genes coding for products targeted to mitochondria, we analyzed in isolation their transcript profiles, focusing on several key mitochondrial functions, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial electron transfer chain, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, transporters, as well as catabolic pathways. In tandem with a metabolomic approach, our data indicated that mitochondrial metabolism was reorganized to support the selective catabolism of both amino acids and fatty acids. Such adjustments would ensure the replenishment of alpha-ketoglutarate and glutamate, which provide the carbon backbones for nitrogen remobilization. Glutamate, being the substrate of the strongly up-regulated cytosolic glutamine synthase, is likely to become a metabolically limiting factor in the latest stages of developmental leaf senescence. Finally, an evolutionary age analysis revealed that, while branched-chain amino acid and proline catabolism are very old mitochondrial functions particularly enriched at the latest stages of leaf senescence, auxin metabolism appears to be rather newly acquired. In summation, our work shows that, during developmental leaf senescence, mitochondria orchestrate catabolic processes by becoming increasingly central energy and metabolic hubs.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131100 (URN)10.1104/pp.16.01463 (DOI)000391173400006 ()27744300 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-13 Created: 2017-02-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wang, Y., Lyu, W., Berkowitz, O., Radomiljac, J. D., Law, S. R., Murcha, M. W., . . . Whelan, J. (2016). Inactivation of Mitochondrial Complex I Induces the Expression of a Twin Cysteine Protein that Targets and Affects Cytosolic, Chloroplastidic and Mitochondrial Function. Molecular Plant, 9(5), 696-710
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inactivation of Mitochondrial Complex I Induces the Expression of a Twin Cysteine Protein that Targets and Affects Cytosolic, Chloroplastidic and Mitochondrial Function
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2016 (English)In: Molecular Plant, ISSN 1674-2052, E-ISSN 1752-9867, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 696-710Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

At12Cys-1 (At5g64400) and At12Cys-2 (At5g09570) are two closely related isogenes that encode small, twin cysteine proteins, typically located in mitochondria. At12Cys-2 transcript is induced in a variety of mutants with disrupted mitochondrial proteins, but an increase in At12Cys protein is only detected in mutants with reduced mitochondrial complex I abundance. Induction of At12Cys protein in mutants that lack mitochondrial complex I is accompanied by At12Cys protein located in mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the cytosol. Biochemical analyses revealed that even single gene deletions, i.e., At12cys-1 or At12cys-2, have an effect on mitochondrial and chloroplast functions. However, only double mutants, i.e., At12cys-1: At12cys-2, affect the abundance of protein and mRNA transcripts encoding translation elongation factors as well as rRNA abundance. Blue native PAGE showed that At12Cys co-migrated with mitochondrial supercomplex I + III. Likewise, deletion of both At12cys-1 and At12cys-2 genes, but not single gene deletions, results in enhanced tolerance to drought and light stress and increased anti-oxidant capacity. The induction and multiple localization of At12Cys upon a reduction in complex I abundance provides a mechanism to specifically signal mitochondrial dysfunction to the cytosol and then beyond to other organelles in the cell.

Keywords
mitochondria, complex I, retrograde signaling, chloroplast, cytosol
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123372 (URN)10.1016/j.molp.2016.01.009 (DOI)000375958800007 ()26829715 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-04 Created: 2016-07-01 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Van Aken, O., De Clercq, I., Ivanova, A., Law, S. R., Van Breusegem, F., Millar, A. H. & Whelan, J. (2016). Mitochondrial and Chloroplast Stress Responses Are Modulated in Distinct Touch and Chemical Inhibition Phases. Plant Physiology, 171(3), 2150-2165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mitochondrial and Chloroplast Stress Responses Are Modulated in Distinct Touch and Chemical Inhibition Phases
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2016 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 171, no 3, p. 2150-2165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies have identified a range of transcription factors that modulate retrograde regulation of mitochondrial and chloroplast functions in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the relative importance of these regulators and whether they act downstream of separate or overlapping signaling cascades is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that multiple stress-related signaling pathways, with distinct kinetic signatures, converge on overlapping gene sets involved in energy organelle function. The transcription factor ANAC017 is almost solely responsible for transcript induction of marker genes around 3 to 6 h after chemical inhibition of organelle function and is a key regulator of mitochondrial and specific types of chloroplast retrograde signaling. However, an independent and highly transient gene expression phase, initiated within 10 to 30 min after treatment, also targets energy organelle functions, and is related to touch and wounding responses. Metabolite analysis demonstrates that this early response is concurrent with rapid changes in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and large changes in transcript abundance of genes encoding mitochondrial dicarboxylate carrier proteins. It was further demonstrated that transcription factors AtWRKY15 and AtWRKY40 have repressive regulatory roles in this touch-responsive gene expression. Together, our results show that several regulatory systems can independently affect energy organelle function in response to stress, providing different means to exert operational control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Plant Biologists, 2016
National Category
Genetics Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125557 (URN)10.1104/pp.16.00273 (DOI)000381303300051 ()27208304 (PubMedID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-09-14 Created: 2016-09-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0389-6650

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