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Lundgren, Tommy
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 46) Show all publications
Eriksson, M., Brännlund, R. & Lundgren, T. (2018). Pricing forest carbon: implications of asymmetry in climate policy. Journal of Forest Economics, 32, 84-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pricing forest carbon: implications of asymmetry in climate policy
2018 (English)In: Journal of Forest Economics, ISSN 1104-6899, E-ISSN 1618-1530, Vol. 32, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using an integrated assessment model, we examine the implications of climate policies that do not fully recognize forest carbon. Specifically, we first investigate the impact of an asymmetric policy that recognizes carbon emissions from fossil fuels while fully ignoring forest carbon. Next, we investigate the relative importance of not recognizing emissions from a reduction in the stock of forest biomass compared to not recognizing sequestration from the growth of forest biomass. We show that asymmetric carbon policies lead to lower levels of welfare, as well as higher emissions and carbon prices. This occurs because the forest resource will be allocated inefficiently under these carbon policies. Broadly, we find that when the social planner does not account for emissions or sequestration from the forest, the planner will set bioenergy levels that are too high and afforestation and avoided deforestation levels that are too low. Our results further reveal that not recognizing forest emissions leads to larger welfare losses than not recognizing sequestration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Climate policy, Forest carbon, Carbon neutrality, Integrated assessment model
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151560 (URN)10.1016/j.jfe.2018.04.003 (DOI)000442663300007 ()
Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Amjadi, G., Lundgren, T. & Persson, L. (2018). The Rebound Effect in Swedish Heavy Industry. Energy Economics, 71, 140-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Rebound Effect in Swedish Heavy Industry
2018 (English)In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 71, p. 140-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy efficiency improvement (EEI) benefits the climate and matters for energy security. The potential emission and energy savings due to EEI may however not fully materialize due to the rebound effect. In this study, we measure the size of the rebound effect for fuel and electricity within the four most energy intensive sectors in Sweden: pulp and paper, basic iron and steel, chemical, and mining. We use a detailed firm-level panel data set for 2000–2008 and apply Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) for measuring the rebound effect. We find that neither fuel nor electricity rebound effects fully offset the potential energy and emission savings. Among the determinants, we find CO2 intensity and fuel/electricity share to be useful indicators for identifying firms with higher or lower rebound effect within each sector.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Energy efficiency improvement, Rebound effect, Stochastic Frontier Analysis
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145666 (URN)10.1016/j.eneco.2018.02.001 (DOI)000431159100011 ()2-s2.0-85042628038 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Karimu, A., Brännlund, R., Lundgren, T. & Söderholm, P. (2017). Energy intensity and convergence in Swedish industry: a combined econometric and decomposition analysis. Energy Economics, 62, 347-356
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy intensity and convergence in Swedish industry: a combined econometric and decomposition analysis
2017 (English)In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 62, p. 347-356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How to reduce the carbon footprint associated with energy use is still a major concern for most decision-makers. Against this background, a better understanding of energy intensity—the ratio of energy use to output and its convergence could be important in the design of policies targeting the reduction in the carbon footprint related to energy use. This paper analyzes the determinants of energy intensity and tests for energy intensity convergence across 14 Swedish industrial sectors. This analysis builds on a nonparametric regression analysis of an intensity index constructed at the industry sector level as well as indices constructed from a decomposition of this index. The latter isolates two key determinants of changes in energy intensity and convergence patterns: the ef- ficiency channel-fundamental improvement in the use of energy and activity channel-structural shifts in the economy. The empirical analysis relies on a detailed sectorial dataset covering the period 1990–2008. The findings indicate that input prices, including the price of energy, have been significant determinants of energy intensity in the Swedish industrial sectors. This effect can primarily be attributed to the efficiency channel and with a less profound influence from the activity channel. We also find evidence of energy intensity convergence among the industrial sectors, and this primarily stems from the activity channel rather than from the efficiency channel.

Keywords
Energy intensity, Convergence, Index numbers, Decomposition, Industrial sectors
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131567 (URN)10.1016/j.eneco.2016.07.017 (DOI)000397376200031 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-02-16 Created: 2017-02-16 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, T. & Zhou, W. (2017). Firm performance and the role of environmental management. Journal of Environmental Management, 203, 330-341
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Firm performance and the role of environmental management
2017 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 203, p. 330-341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper analyzes the interactions between three dimensions of firm performance productivity, energy efficiency, and environmental performance and especially sheds light on the role of environmental management. In this context, environmental management is investments to reduce environmental impact, which may also affect firm competitiveness, in terms of change in productivity, and spur more (or less) efficient use of energy. We apply data envelopment analysis (DEA) technique to calculate the Malmquist firm performance indexes, and a panel vector auto-regression (VAR) methodology is utilized to investigate the dynamic and causal relationship between the three dimensions of firm performance and environmental investment. Main results show that energy efficiency and environmental performance are integrated, and energy efficiency and productivity positively reinforce each other, signifying the cost saving property of more efficient use of energy. Hence, increasing energy efficiency, as advocated in many of today's energy policies, could capture multiple benefits. The results also show that improved environmental performance and environmental investments constrain next period productivity, a result that would be in contrast with the Porter hypothesis and strategic corporate social responsibility; both concepts conveying the notion that pro-environmental management can boost productivity and competitiveness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2017
Keywords
Energy efficiency, Environmental investment, Environmental performance, Productivity, Malmquist index, Panel VAR
National Category
Environmental Management Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141396 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.07.053 (DOI)000412251300034 ()28806649 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-01 Created: 2017-11-01 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bostian, M., Färe, R., Grosskopf, S. & Lundgren, T. (2017). Network Representations of Pollution-Generating Technologies. International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, 11(3), 193-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Network Representations of Pollution-Generating Technologies
2017 (English)In: International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, ISSN 1932-1465, E-ISSN 1932-1473, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 193-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We update developments on modeling technology including unintended outputs and show how these can, at least to a large extent, be incorporated in a network model framework. Recently there have been efforts to specify more detailed models which include multiple functions to separately capture intended and unintended products. Yet another recent strand of the recent literature has also explicitly tried to include a material balance condition in the model. We see this general evolution as beginning with what might be called a black box technology, with inputs entering the box, and good and bad outputs exiting the box. The more sophisticated models can be thought of as filling in the black box with the more detailed processes involved with production, prevention and abatement, with production accompanied by undesirable byproducts subject to legal regulations and laws of nature. This can be modeled as a network within the black box.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Now Publishers Inc., 2017
Keywords
Network technology, pollution generating technology, distance function
National Category
Economics Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151805 (URN)10.1561/101.00000093 (DOI)000443208300001 ()
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Amjadi, G., Lundgren, T., Persson, L. & Zhang, S. (2017). The rebound effect in the Swedish heavy industry.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The rebound effect in the Swedish heavy industry
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Energy efficiency improvement (EEI) benefits the climate and matters for energy security. The potential emission and energy savings due to EEI may however not fully materialize due to the rebound effect. In this study, we measure the size of rebound effect for the two energy types fuel and electricity within the four most energy intensive sectors in Sweden – pulp and paper, basic iron and steel, chemical, and mining. We use a detailed firm-level panel data set for the period 2000-2008 and apply Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) for measuring the rebound effect. We find that both fuel and electricity rebound effects do not fully offset the potential for energy and emission savings. Furthermore, we find CO2 intensity and fuel and electricity share as the two main determinants of rebound effect in Swedish heavy industry. Our results seems to imply that it matters both to what extent and where to promote EEI, as the rebound effect varies between sectors as well as between firms within sectors. 

Series
CERE working paper ; 2017:1
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130877 (URN)
Available from: 2017-01-31 Created: 2017-01-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Zhang, S., Lundgren, T. & Zhou, W. (2016). Energy efficiency in Swedish Industry: A firm-level data envelopment analysis. Energy Economics, 55, 42-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy efficiency in Swedish Industry: A firm-level data envelopment analysis
2016 (English)In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 55, p. 42-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper assesses energy efficiency in Swedish industry. Using unique firm-level panel data covering the years 2001–2008, the efficiency estimates are obtained for firms in 14 industrial sectors by using data envelopment analysis (DEA). The analysis accounts for multi-output technologies where undesirable outputs are produced alongside with the desirable output. The results show that there was potential to improve energy efficiency in all the sectors and relatively large energy inefficiencies existed in small energy-use industries in the sample period. Also, we assess how the EU ETS, the carbon dioxide (CO2) tax and the energy tax affect energy efficiency by conducting a second-stage regression analysis. To obtain consistent estimates for the regression model, we apply a modified, input-oriented version of the double bootstrap procedure of Simar and Wilson (2007). The results of the regression analysis reveal that the EU ETS and the CO2 tax did not have significant influences on energy efficiency in the sample period. However, the energy tax had a positive relation with the energy efficiency.

Keywords
Energy efficiency, EU ETS, Data envelopment analysis, Double bootstrap
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119120 (URN)10.1016/j.eneco.2015.12.023 (DOI)000375358100005 ()
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-04-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Bostian, M., Färe, R., Grosskopf, S. & Lundgren, T. (2016). Environmental investment and firm performance: a network approach. Energy Economics, 57, 243-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental investment and firm performance: a network approach
2016 (English)In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 57, p. 243-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines the role of investment in environmental production practices for both environmental performance and energy efficiency over time. We employ a network DEA approach that links successive production technologies through intertemporal investment decisions with a period by period estimation. This allows us to estimate energy efficiency and environmental performance separately, as well as productivity change and its associated decompositions into efficiency change and technology change. Incorporating a network model also allows us to account for both short-term environmental management practices and long-term environmental investments in each of our productivity measures. We apply this framework to a panel of detailed plant-level production data for Swedish manufacturing firms covering the years 2002-2008.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Energy efficiency, Environmental performance, Network DEA, Malmquist index, Investment
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125561 (URN)10.1016/j.eneco.2016.05.013 (DOI)000380419900022 ()
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-09-13 Created: 2016-09-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Brännlund, R. & Lundgren, T. (2016). Pricing forest carbon: implications of asymmetry in climate policy. Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pricing forest carbon: implications of asymmetry in climate policy
2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we use an integrated assessment model to examine the implications of not recognizing, and partially recognizing forest carbon in climate policy. Specifically, we investigate the impact of an asymmetric carbon policy that recognizes emissions from fossil fuels while ignoring emissions from forests. We additionally investigate the relative importance of not recognizing positive emissions from a reduction in the stock of forest biomass, or of not recognizing negative emissions from the growth of forest biomass. We show that asymmetric carbon policies lead to lower levels of welfare, as well as higher emissions and carbon prices. This occurs because the forest resource will be allocated inefficiently under these carbon policies. Broadly, we find that when the social planner does not account for neither positive or negative forest emissions, the planner will set bioenergy levels that are too high and afforestation and avoided deforestation levels that are too low. Our results further reveal that not recognizing forest emissions leads to larger welfare losses than not recognizing sequestration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2016. p. 25
Series
CERE Working Paper ; 2016:06
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119895 (URN)
Available from: 2016-05-02 Created: 2016-05-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, T., Marklund, P.-O., Samakovlis, E. & Zhou, W. (2015). Carbon prices and incentives for technological development. Journal of Environmental Management, 150, 393-403
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon prices and incentives for technological development
2015 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 150, p. 393-403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is concern that the carbon prices generated through climate policies are too low to create the incentives necessary to stimulate technological development. This paper empirically analyzes how the Swedish carbon dioxide (CO2) tax and the European Union emission trading system (EU ETS) have affected productivity development in the Swedish pulp and paper industry 1998-2008. A Luenberger total factor productivity (TFP) indicator is computed using data envelopment analysis. The results show that climate policy had a modest impact on technological development in the pulp and paper industry, and if significant it was negative. The price of fossil fuels, on the contrary, seems to have created important incentives for technological development. Hence, the results suggest that the carbon prices faced by the industry through EU ETS and the CO2 tax have been too low. Even though the data for this study is specific for Sweden, the models and results are applicable internationally. When designing policy to mitigate CO2 emissions, it is vital that the policy creates a carbon price that is high enough otherwise the pressure on technological development will not be sufficiently strong. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
CO2 tax, EU ETS, Luenberger total factor productivity, indicator, GMM
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100944 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.12.015 (DOI)000349504300041 ()25560661 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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