umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Joffer, J., Flacking, R., Bergström, E., Randell, E. & Jerdén, L. (2019). Self-rated health, subjective social status in school and socioeconomic status in adolescents: a cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 19, Article ID 785.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated health, subjective social status in school and socioeconomic status in adolescents: a cross-sectional study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 785Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Social position, traditionally measured by objective data on socioeconomic status (SES), is linked to health status in adults. In adolescents, the association is more uncertain and there are some studies suggesting that subjective social status (SSS) might be more adequate in relation to health. This study aimed to examine associations between SSS in school, SES and self-rated health (SRH) in adolescent boys and girls.

Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional research design with quantitative survey data was used. The study involved 705 Swedish adolescents in upper secondary school (17–18-year-olds). SRH was measured with a single-item question and SSS by a question where adolescents were asked to assess their social position within their school. Formal education level of the parents was used as a proxy for objective SES. Univariable and multivariable ordinal regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations between SRH and SSS in school and SES.

Results: In the multivariable analysis, SSS in school was positively associated with SRH, whereas no significant association between SES and SRH was found. The proportion of adolescents with high SRH increased with higher steps on the SSS ladder. Significant gender differences were found in that boys rated their SRH and SSS in school higher than girls did.

Conclusions: The study shows that self-rated health in adolescents is related to perceived social position in school. Subjective social status in school seems to be a useful health-related measure of social position in adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Adolescents, Gender, Health status, Self-rated health, Socioeconomic status, Subjective social status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161715 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-7140-3 (DOI)000472845800005 ()31221114 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, FAS dnr 2009-0292
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-08-05 Last updated: 2019-08-05Bibliographically approved
Joffer, J., Jerdén, L., Öhman, A. & Flacking, R. (2016). Exploring self-rated health among adolescents: a think-aloud study. BMC Public Health, 16, Article ID 156.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring self-rated health among adolescents: a think-aloud study
2016 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Despite extensive use of self-rated health questions in youth studies, little is known about what such questions capture among adolescents. Hence, the aim of this study was to explore how adolescents interpret and reason when answering a question about self-rated health.

METHODS: A qualitative study using think-aloud interviews explored the question, "How do you feel most of the time?", using five response options ("Very good", "Rather good", "Neither good, nor bad", "Rather bad", and "Very bad"). The study involved 58 adolescents (29 boys and 29 girls) in lower secondary school (7th grade) and upper secondary school (12th grade) in Sweden.

RESULTS: Respondents' interpretations of the question about how they felt included social, mental, and physical aspects. Gender differences were found primarily in that girls emphasized stressors, while age differences were reflected mainly in the older respondents' inclusion of a wider variety of influences on their assessments. The five response options all demonstrated differences in self-rated health, and the respondents' understanding of the middle option, "Neither good, nor bad", varied widely. In the answering of potential sensitive survey questions, rationales for providing honest or biased answers were described.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of a self-rated health question including the word 'feel' captured a holistic view of health among adolescents. Differences amongst response options should be acknowledged when analyzing self-rated health questions. If anonymity is not feasible when answering questions on self-rated health, a high level of privacy is recommended to increase the likelihood of reliability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Self-rated health, Subjective health, Health assessment, Feel, Adolescence, Qualitative, Think-aloud interview, Cognitive interviewing, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117585 (URN)10.1186/s12889-016-2837-z (DOI)000370407800001 ()26880571 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Joffer, J., Burell, G., Bergström, E., Stenlund, H., Sjörs, L. & Jerdén, L. (2014). Predictors of smoking among Swedish adolescents. BMC Public Health, 14, 1296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of smoking among Swedish adolescents
Show others...
2014 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, p. 1296-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Smoking most often starts in adolescence, implying that understanding of predicting factors for smoking initiation during this time period is essential for successful smoking prevention. The aim of this study was to examine predicting factors in early adolescence for smoking in late adolescence.

METHODS: Longitudinal cohort study, involving 649 Swedish adolescents from lower secondary school (12-13 years old) to upper secondary school (17-18 years old). Tobacco habits, behavioural, intra- and interpersonal factors and socio-demographic variables were assessed through questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify predicting factors.

RESULTS: Smoking prevalence increased from 3.3% among 12-13 year olds to 25.1% among 17-18 year olds. Possible predictors of smoking were: female sex, lower parental education, poorer family mood, poorer self-rated health, poorer self-esteem, less negative attitude towards smoking, binge drinking, snus use and smoking. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, female sex (OR 1.64, CI 1.08-2.49), medium and low self-esteem (medium: OR 1.57, CI 1.03-2.38, low: 2.79, CI 1.46-5.33), less negative attitude towards smoking (OR 2.81, CI 1.70-4.66) and ever using snus (OR 3.43, CI 1.78-6.62) remained significant independent predicting factors.

CONCLUSIONS: The study stresses the importance of strengthening adolescents' self-esteem, promoting anti-smoking attitudes in early adolescence, as well as avoidance of early initiation of snus. Such measures should be joint efforts involving parents, schools, youth associations, and legislating authorities.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-98496 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-14-1296 (DOI)000347855900001 ()25518992 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-22 Created: 2015-01-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Randell, E., Joffer, J., Flacking, R., Starrin, B. & Jerdén, L. Pride, shame and health among adolescents - a cross-sectional survey.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pride, shame and health among adolescents - a cross-sectional survey
Show others...
(English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125621 (URN)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-09-13 Created: 2016-09-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07
Joffer, J., Randell, E., Öhman, A., Flacking, R., Bergström, E. & Jerdén, L. Subjective social status and health in adolescence: a mixed methods study.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subjective social status and health in adolescence: a mixed methods study
Show others...
(English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125623 (URN)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-09-13 Created: 2016-09-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8216-0344

Search in DiVA

Show all publications