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Bäckström, A., Johansson, A.-M., Rönnqvist, L., Rosander, K., von Hofsten, C. & Domellöf, E. (2019). Action planning in relation to movement performance in 6-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder. In: : . Paper presented at 31st Annual Meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability, Paris, France, May 23-25 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Action planning in relation to movement performance in 6-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Recent research proposes problems with action planning as part of atypical motor functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), although findings are inconsistent. This study investigated relations between action planning and movement performance in 6-year-old children with and without ASD.

Patients and methods: 3D kinematic recordings of preferred arm/hand performance on a sequential peg rotation task with varying complexity of goal insertion (four endpoints and either visual or occluded goal display at onset) were conducted in 6 children with ASD (MAge = 6.4) and 6 typically developing (TD) controls (MAge = 6.5).

Results: Analyses revealed significant (p < .05) group and task-endpoint differences for movement segmentation (number of movement units, MUs) and 3D movement distance. Children with ASD generally displayed more MUs and longer distances than controls and all children showed increased MUs and movement distance on more complex task-endpoints. TD controls showed significantly shorter movement initiation latency (MIL) durations than ASD in the visual condition and evidently longer MILs in the occluded than visual condition. In contrast, no difference between goal display conditions was shown for the ASD group.

Conclusion: Children with ASD generally had longer movement distances and more segmented movements than controls, suggesting less efficient movement performance. Movement performance was not evidently affected by goal display condition in either group. However, the lack of MIL differences between goal display conditions within the ASD group indicates reduced pre-planning, possibly affecting movement execution efficiency.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160514 (URN)
Conference
31st Annual Meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability, Paris, France, May 23-25 2019
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2015.0192
Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
Rönnqvist, L., Domellöf, E., Johansson, A.-M., Riklund, K., Warntjes, M. J. B. & Lenfeldt, N. (2019). Associations between brain volumes, myelin and upper-limb kinematics in children born preterm. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 61(S2), 53-54, Article ID OP 130.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between brain volumes, myelin and upper-limb kinematics in children born preterm
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2019 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 61, no S2, p. 53-54, article id OP 130Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Long-term outcomes linked to preterm (PT) births have generally found an increased amount of neuromotor-developmental delays and/or disabilities. Few studies have addressed how upper-limb kinematics associates with brain volumes and myelination. This study aimed to investigate such possible relationships within children born PT compared with term-born controls at early school age, in relation to gestational age (GA) and birth-weight (BW).

Material and methods: This sub-study, part of a multidisciplinary project exploring long-term effects of PT births, included 27 children (Mean age= 8.2y) born PT (Mean GA= 32-weeks, range 22-35), and 33 age-matched born term. Kinematics of task-specific head and bi-/uni-manual upper-limb-movements was measured by a 3D-registration system (ProReflex). Brain volumes and myelin content were investigated by a 3-Tesla, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-scanner with a 7-min Synthetic MRI (SyMRI) acquisition-sequence.

Results: Significantly (p < .05) less efficient upper-limb kinematics with more segmented and longer movement paths was found in PT-born compared with term-born, particularly evident for those extremely-/very PT-born (<32 GA). Smaller total brain volumes and regional white-matter reduction with less myelin were significantly correlated with more segmented and longer arm- and head-trajectories, and with lower GA and BW.

Discussion-conclusion: The present findings show that an extremely- and very-PT-birth may cause long-term effects on neuromotor-mechanisms involved in goal-directed movements and that these effects are associated with generally delayed brain development and myelination. Additionally, SyMRI stands out as a suitable and cost-effective method for longitudinal/follow-up of brain development and changes, reducing distress in children due to a decreased scan time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
preterm, neuro-motor-mechanisms, myelin, SyMRI, kinematics
National Category
Social Sciences Neurosciences
Research subject
Psychology; Pediatrics; Radiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159820 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.14244 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-179
Available from: 2019-06-09 Created: 2019-06-09 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Domellöf, E., Bäckström, A., Johansson, A.-M., Rönnqvist, L., von Hofsten, C. & Rosander, K. (2019). Kinematic characteristics of second‐order motor planning and performance in 6‐ and 10‐year‐old children and adults: Effects of age and task constraints. Developmental Psychobiology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinematic characteristics of second‐order motor planning and performance in 6‐ and 10‐year‐old children and adults: Effects of age and task constraints
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2019 (English)In: Developmental Psychobiology, ISSN 0012-1630, E-ISSN 1098-2302Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study explored age‐related differences in motor planning as expressed in arm‐hand kinematics during a sequential peg moving task with varying demands on goal insertion complexity (second‐order planning). The peg was a vertical cylinder with either a circular or semicircular base. The task was to transport the peg between two positions and rotate it various amounts horizontally before fitting into its final position. The amount of rotation required was either 0°, 90°, 180°, or −90°. The reaching for the peg, the displacement of it, and the way the rotation was accomplished was analyzed. Assessments of end state comfort, goal interpretation errors, and type of grip used were also included. Participants were two groups of typically developing children, one younger (Mage = 6.7 years) and one older (Mage = 10.3 years), and one adult group (Mage = 34.9 years). The children, particularly 6‐year‐olds, displayed less efficient prehensile movement organization than adults. Related to less efficient motor planning, 6‐year‐olds, mainly, had shorter reach‐to‐grasp onset latencies, higher velocities, and shorter time to peak velocities, and longer grasp durations than adults. Importantly, the adults rotated the peg during transport. In contrast, the children made corrective rotations after the hand had arrived at the goal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
action prediction, children, end state comfort, kinematics, motor planning
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163269 (URN)10.1002/dev.21911 (DOI)31502277 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072010300 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Children and Motor Planning (CHAMP)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2015.0192Swedish Research Council, 2011-179
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-16
Andersson, G., Renström, B., Blaszczyk, I. & Domellöf, E. (2019). Upper-extremity Spasticity-reducing Treatment in Adjunct to Movement Training and Orthoses in Children with Cerebral Palsy at Gross Motor Function- and Manual Ability Classification System Levels IV-V: A Descriptive Study. Developmental Neurorehabilitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upper-extremity Spasticity-reducing Treatment in Adjunct to Movement Training and Orthoses in Children with Cerebral Palsy at Gross Motor Function- and Manual Ability Classification System Levels IV-V: A Descriptive Study
2019 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Covering a 20-year period of work with children with severe cerebral palsy (CP) within a Swedish habilitation service, changes in passive wrist extension with fingers extended (PWE-FE) and current hand function are described and compared between children receiving systematic upper-extremity treatment with botulinum neurotoxin type A and intervention programs from before 7 years of age (Group 1, n = 7), those whom for various reasons did not undergo this treatment (Group 2, n = 10), and those not having the option to receive treatment until later during childhood/adolescence (Group 3, n = 8). Group 3 showed more critical and less normal PWE-FE values for both wrists, and poorer hand function scores, particularly compared with Group 1. Findings cautiously suggest that repeated upper-extremity spasticity-reducing treatment and movement training/orthoses from an early age may help prevent critical loss of passive range of motion of the wrist joint flexion/extension and promote hand function development in children with severe CP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Severe cerebral palsy, botulinum toxin, upper-extremity interventions, passive wrist extension, hand function, development
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Rehabilitation Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163315 (URN)10.1080/17518423.2019.1655677 (DOI)000482720500001 ()31437072 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071011008 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Västerbotten County CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2015.0192
Available from: 2019-09-13 Created: 2019-09-13 Last updated: 2019-09-20
Säfström, D. & Domellöf, E. (2018). Brain activations supporting linking of action phases in a sequential manual task. NeuroImage, 172, 608-619
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brain activations supporting linking of action phases in a sequential manual task
2018 (English)In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, ., Vol. 172, p. 608-619Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most everyday manual tasks, like grabbing a cup of coffee to drink, are comprised of a sequence of action phases. Efficient phase transitions, or linking, are achieved using a predictive control policy where motor commands for the next phase are specified and released in anticipation of sensory confirmation of goal completion of the current phase. If there is a discrepancy between predicted and actual sensory feedback about goal completion, corrective actions are employed to complete the current action phase before proceeding to the next. However, we lack understanding about brain activations supporting such predictive linking and corrective actions in manual tasks. In this study, during 3-T MRI-scanning, sixteen participants (5 males, 11 females; mean age 27.3 years, range 23–37) performed a sequential manual task, with or without the possibility for predictive linking. We found that predictive linking of action phases was associated with increased activation in a network that included right-sided fronto-parietal areas related to visuospatial attention, eye movements and motor planning, left-sided parietal areas related to implicit timing and shifts of motor attention, occipital regions bilaterally reflecting visual processing related to the attended next target, and finally, the anterior midcingulate cortex involved in continuous performance monitoring. Corrective actions were associated with increased activation in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex involved in reestablishing executive control over previously automatized behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Sensorimotor control, Sequential actions, Motor prediction, Error detection, fMRI
National Category
Medical Biotechnology
Research subject
Biomedical Radiation Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145639 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.02.014 (DOI)29428579 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-12 Created: 2018-03-12 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Domellöf, E., Johansson, A.-M. & Rönnqvist, L. (2018). Developmental progression and side specialization in upper-limb movements from 4 to 8 years in children born preterm and fullterm. Developmental Neuropsychology, 43(3), 219-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental progression and side specialization in upper-limb movements from 4 to 8 years in children born preterm and fullterm
2018 (English)In: Developmental Neuropsychology, ISSN 8756-5641, E-ISSN 1532-6942, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 219-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated developmental changes and differences in upper-limb movement organization from 4 to 8 years of age in children born preterm (PT) and fullterm (FT). Kinematic recordings of precision-demanding unimanual movements and lateral assessments were carried out in 37 children (18 PT). All children, particularly children born PT, displayed considerable gain in movement kinematics. Contrary to controls, children born PT displayed persistently less-evident side preference. Gestational age (GA) contributed significantly to kinematic differences shown, with larger upper-limb deviances in the lowest GAs, in agreement with cross-sectional findings of altered hemispheric connections and delayed side-specialization among children born very PT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Neurosciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145742 (URN)10.1080/87565641.2018.1426765 (DOI)000427940500005 ()29377727 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Domellöf, E., Bäckström, A., Johansson, A.-M., Rosander, K., von Hofsten, C. & Rönnqvist, L. (2018). Sequential upper-limb action planning in children with autism spectrum disorder: a kinematic pilot study. Paper presented at 30th Annual Meeting of the EACD. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 60 (Suppl. 2), 34-34, Article ID 10.1111/dmcn.13790.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sequential upper-limb action planning in children with autism spectrum disorder: a kinematic pilot study
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2018 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60 (Suppl. 2), p. 34-34, article id 10.1111/dmcn.13790Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Recent research on sensory-motor skill in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suggest that problems with planning sequential actions may explain difficulties with motor execution in this population. The present pilot study investigated upper-limb movement kinematics during a goal-directed manual task requiring sequential action planning in children with and without ASD at 6-7 years.

Patients and method: 3D kinematic recordings of performance with the preferred arm/hand during a sequential peg moving task with varying complexity of goal insertion (five endpoint conditions, open/revealed goal presentation) were carried out in 3 children with ASD (2 girls, mean age 6.3 years) and 3 typically developing children (3 girls, mean age 7 years). End state comfort and trial errors were also assessed.

Results: Preliminary analyses of whole movement spatiotemporal segmentation (movement units, MUs) at trial level revealed significant main effects for group and endpoint condition. Overall, children with ASD consistently performed less proficiently (more MUs) than controls for all conditions across hand/arm and head. Independent of group, all children displayed increased MUs for the more complex endpoints. Children with ASD also showed evidently poorer planning behavior (less end state comfort and increased trial errors) than controls.

Conclusion: Findings suggest difficulties with sequential movement planning in children with ASD in terms of suboptimal movement organization together with reduced end state comfort and inaccurate goal interpretations. In contrast to controls, children with ASD did not seem to have planned the onward action prior to action execution, contributing to the observed less proficient movement kinematics.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151247 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.13790 (DOI)
Conference
30th Annual Meeting of the EACD
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2015.0192
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2019-09-16
Lenfeldt, N., Johansson, A.-M., Domellöf, E., Riklund, K. & Rönnqvist, L. (2017). Alterations in white matter microstructure are associated with goal-directed upper-limb movement segmentation in children born extremely preterm. Human Brain Mapping, 38(10), 5051-5068
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alterations in white matter microstructure are associated with goal-directed upper-limb movement segmentation in children born extremely preterm
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2017 (English)In: Human Brain Mapping, ISSN 1065-9471, E-ISSN 1097-0193, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 5051-5068Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Altered white matter microstructure is commonly found in children born preterm (PT), especially those born at an extremely low gestational age (GA). These children also commonly show disturbed motor function. This study explores the relation between white matter alterations and upperlimb movement segmentation in 41 children born PT (19 girls), and 41 children born at term (18 girls) at 8 years. The PT group was subdivided into extremely PT (E-PT; GA = 25–27 weeks, N = 10), very PT (V-PT; GA = 28–32 weeks, N = 13), and moderately PT (M-PT; GA = 33–35 weeks, N = 18). Arm/hand preference (preferred/non-preferred) was determined through object interactions and the brain hemispheres were designated accordingly. White matter alterations were assessed using diffusion tensor imaging in nine areas, and movement segmentation of the body-parts head, shoulder, elbow, and wrist were registered during a unimanual goal-directed task. Increased movement segmentation was demonstrated consistently on the preferred side in the E-PT group compared with the term born group. Also compared with the term born peers, the E-PT group demonstrated reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in the cerebral peduncle (targeting the corticospinal tract) in the hemisphere on the non-preferred side and in the splenium of corpus callosum. In contrast, in the anterior internal capsule on the preferred side, the E-PT group had increased FA. Lower FA in the cerebral peduncle, but higher FA in the anterior internal capsule, was associated with increased movement segmentation across body-parts in a contralateral manner. The results suggest that impaired development of sensorimotor tracts in E-PT children could explain a sub-optimal spatiotemporal organization of upper-limb movements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
diffusion tensor imaging, anisotropy, sensorimotor, corticospinal, internal capsule, laterality
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Radiology; Psychology; Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139528 (URN)10.1002/hbm.23714 (DOI)000417002000017 ()28685893 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-179
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A.-M., Domellöf, E. & Rönnqvist, L. (2016). Associations between manual dexterity scores from the M-ABC 2 and kinematic properties of goal-directed upper-limb movements and in school-aged children born preterm. In: Challenge the Boundaries: . Paper presented at International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities Stockholm 1–4 June 2016 (pp. P-Fr-135).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between manual dexterity scores from the M-ABC 2 and kinematic properties of goal-directed upper-limb movements and in school-aged children born preterm
2016 (English)In: Challenge the Boundaries, 2016, p. P-Fr-135-Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background

Children born preterm (PT; <38 gestational weeks, GW) are frequently reported to have deviations in motor proficiency. Most studies use standardized test batteries to determine motor function in these children. Few studies have however examined the relations between test battery outcomes and outcomes from more detailed movement analysis.

Aim

To investigate associations between outcomes on the manual dexterity subtests from the Movement-ABC 2 with detailed 3D kinematic registrations during performance of a sensorimotor task with demands on fine motor skills and precision in school-aged children born PT and a comparison group born at full-term (FT).

Methods

As part of an ongoing quasi-longitudinal study, 7-8 year old children born PT (< 36 GW; n = 17) and an aged matched typically developing comparison group (n = 19) performed the M-ABC 2 and a fine motor task where 3D kinematic registration technique was applied. M-ABC 2 scaled scores from the manual dexterity index (MDI) were correlated with kinematic parameters sensitive to planning and on-line control (movement units, distance and speed). Differences between the PT and FT group were also analyzed.

Results

Preliminary analyses show no group differences on the outcomes from the 3D kinematic analyses but differences were evident on two (peg-board and follow-track) of the subtests constituting the MDI and the MDI where children born PT have lower scores than FT. For both groups but in different ways, within-group correlations show some associations between extracted kinematic properties and dexterity outcomes.

Conclusions

As the groups differed on the MDI outcomes it is surprising that none were found on the kinematic properties examined. Further, relatively few associations were found between the kinematic and M-ABC 2 outcomes. Investigation of the influence cognitive and executive functions have on these performances may offer explanations for this inconsistency

National Category
Psychology Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Psychology; Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125483 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities Stockholm 1–4 June 2016
Funder
Swedish Research Council, Dnr:2011-179
Available from: 2016-09-13 Created: 2016-09-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07
Rönnqvist, L., Domellöf, E., Johansson, A.-M., Faroogi, A., Domellöf, M., Riklund, K., . . . Birgander, R. (2016). Effects of twin-births on IQ, handedness, and brain volumes in 8-years-old preterm born twins and matched singletons: a pilot study. Paper presented at International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities, Stockholm 1–4 June 2016. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 58(S6), 57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of twin-births on IQ, handedness, and brain volumes in 8-years-old preterm born twins and matched singletons: a pilot study
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2016 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 58, no S6, p. 57-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Children born preterm have a high prevalence of long-term cognitive and behavioral disturbances. Still, studies of how preterm-twin-births may effect brain maturation and thus, contribute to long-term effects on brain-behavioral development and functions are rare.

Aim: To investigate whether brain volumes differ between twin (TPB) and singleton preterm born (SPB) and full-term born children (FTB) and associate to long-term cognitive and behavioral outcomes as well as to gestational age (GA), birth weight (BW) and head circumference (BHC) at birth.

Method: A sample of 22 twin born preterm (Mean GA=32.1, BW=1781), 23 matched singletons preterm (Mean GA=31.8, BW=1751), and 22 full-term singletons were included. All children were investigated by means of their cognition functions (WISC-IV), handedness performance index and brain volumes (3 Tesla MRI) at early school ages (M=7.8y) in 40 children (9 TPB, 10 SPB, 21 FTB).

Results: The FTB-children performed better than both TPB and SPB on cognitive performance, and showed higher IQ. Brain volumes, especially Gray matter were stronger associated with IQ in the twins. Furthermore it was found that the SPB singletons had smaller Total Brain volume and less Grey Matter than FTB. The twins showed a higher prevalence of non-right handedness associated to GA, than both SPB and FTB. Independently of birth status, GA, BW and BHC were found to correlate positively with IQ, Total Brain volume, and Gray-and White matter volumes.

Conclusion: Discordant handedness in TPB children and associations to lower GA indicate effect of twin-births on early functional laterality. The overall associations found between low GA/BW and smaller BHC at birth in preterm born and associations with lower IQ and smaller brain volumes at 8-y indicate that a very preterm birth are a higher predictor for long-term effects on brain development and cognitive performance than twin-birth per se.

National Category
Pediatrics Psychology Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126397 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.126_13241 (DOI)
Conference
International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities, Stockholm 1–4 June 2016
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-179
Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0240-3690

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