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Rönnqvist, Louise
Publications (10 of 85) Show all publications
Domellöf, E., Johansson, A.-M. & Rönnqvist, L. (2018). Developmental progression and side specialization in upper-limb movements from 4 to 8 years in children born preterm and fullterm. Developmental Neuropsychology, 43(3), 219-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental progression and side specialization in upper-limb movements from 4 to 8 years in children born preterm and fullterm
2018 (English)In: Developmental Neuropsychology, ISSN 8756-5641, E-ISSN 1532-6942, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 219-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated developmental changes and differences in upper-limb movement organization from 4 to 8 years of age in children born preterm (PT) and fullterm (FT). Kinematic recordings of precision-demanding unimanual movements and lateral assessments were carried out in 37 children (18 PT). All children, particularly children born PT, displayed considerable gain in movement kinematics. Contrary to controls, children born PT displayed persistently less-evident side preference. Gestational age (GA) contributed significantly to kinematic differences shown, with larger upper-limb deviances in the lowest GAs, in agreement with cross-sectional findings of altered hemispheric connections and delayed side-specialization among children born very PT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Neurosciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145742 (URN)10.1080/87565641.2018.1426765 (DOI)000427940500005 ()29377727 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Domellöf, E., Bäckström, A., Johansson, A.-M., Rosander, K., von Hofsten, C. & Rönnqvist, L. (2018). Sequential upper-limb action planning in children with autism spectrum disorder: a kinematic pilot study. Paper presented at 30th Annual Meeting of the EACD. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 60 (Suppl. 2), 34-34, Article ID 10.1111/dmcn.13790.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sequential upper-limb action planning in children with autism spectrum disorder: a kinematic pilot study
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2018 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60 (Suppl. 2), p. 34-34, article id 10.1111/dmcn.13790Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Recent research on sensory-motor skill in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suggest that problems with planning sequential actions may explain difficulties with motor execution in this population. The present pilot study investigated upper-limb movement kinematics during a goal-directed manual task requiring sequential action planning in children with and without ASD at 6-7 years.

Patients and method: 3D kinematic recordings of performance with the preferred arm/hand during a sequential peg moving task with varying complexity of goal insertion (five endpoint conditions, open/revealed goal presentation) were carried out in 3 children with ASD (2 girls, mean age 6.3 years) and 3 typically developing children (3 girls, mean age 7 years). End state comfort and trial errors were also assessed.

Results: Preliminary analyses of whole movement spatiotemporal segmentation (movement units, MUs) at trial level revealed significant main effects for group and endpoint condition. Overall, children with ASD consistently performed less proficiently (more MUs) than controls for all conditions across hand/arm and head. Independent of group, all children displayed increased MUs for the more complex endpoints. Children with ASD also showed evidently poorer planning behavior (less end state comfort and increased trial errors) than controls.

Conclusion: Findings suggest difficulties with sequential movement planning in children with ASD in terms of suboptimal movement organization together with reduced end state comfort and inaccurate goal interpretations. In contrast to controls, children with ASD did not seem to have planned the onward action prior to action execution, contributing to the observed less proficient movement kinematics.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151247 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.13790 (DOI)
Conference
30th Annual Meeting of the EACD
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2015.0192
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2018-09-04
Sommer, M., Häger, C., Boraxbekk, C.-J. & Rönnqvist, L. (2018). Timing Training in Female Soccer Players: Effects on Skilled Movement Performance and Brain Responses. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 311.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Timing Training in Female Soccer Players: Effects on Skilled Movement Performance and Brain Responses
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although trainers and athletes consider “good timing skills” critical for optimal sport performance, little is known in regard to how sport-specific skills may benefit from timing training. Accordingly, this study investigated the effects of timing training on soccer skill performance and the associated changes in functional brain response in elite- and sub-elite female soccer players. Twenty-five players (mean age 19.5 years; active in the highest or second highest divisions in Sweden), were randomly assigned to either an experimental- or a control group. The experimental group (n = 12) was subjected to a 4-week program (12 sessions) of synchronized metronome training (SMT). We evaluated effects on accuracy and variability in a soccer cross-pass task. The associated brain response was captured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while watching videos with soccer-specific actions. SMT improved soccer cross-pass performance, with a significant increase in outcome accuracy, combined with a decrease in outcome variability. SMT further induced changes in the underlying brain response associated with observing a highly familiar soccer-specific action, denoted as decreased activation in the cerebellum post SMT. Finally, decreased cerebellar activation was associated with improved cross-pass performance and sensorimotor synchronization. These findings suggest a more efficient neural recruitment during action observation after SMT. To our knowledge, this is the first controlled study providing behavioral and neurophysiological evidence that timing training may positively influence soccer-skill, while strengthening the action-perception coupling via enhanced sensorimotor synchronization abilities, and thus influencing the underlying brain responses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
timing training, neuroplasticity, fMRI, action observation, action perception, soccer
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150294 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2018.00311 (DOI)000440612300001 ()
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, 140/10; P2011-0171
Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Rönnqvist, L. (2018). Varför finns vänsterhänta?. Forskning & Framsteg, 52(1), 63-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Varför finns vänsterhänta?
2018 (Swedish)In: Forskning & Framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 63-64Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144022 (URN)
Available from: 2018-01-17 Created: 2018-01-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Lenfeldt, N., Johansson, A.-M., Domellöf, E., Riklund, K. & Rönnqvist, L. (2017). Alterations in white matter microstructure are associated with goal-directed upper-limb movement segmentation in children born extremely preterm. Human Brain Mapping, 38, 5051-5068
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alterations in white matter microstructure are associated with goal-directed upper-limb movement segmentation in children born extremely preterm
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2017 (English)In: Human Brain Mapping, ISSN 1065-9471, E-ISSN 1097-0193, Vol. 38, p. 5051-5068Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Altered white matter microstructure is commonly found in children born preterm (PT), especially those born at an extremely low gestational age (GA). These children also commonly show disturbed motor function. This study explores the relation between white matter alterations and upperlimb movement segmentation in 41 children born PT (19 girls), and 41 children born at term (18 girls) at 8 years. The PT group was subdivided into extremely PT (E-PT; GA = 25–27 weeks, N = 10), very PT (V-PT; GA = 28–32 weeks, N = 13), and moderately PT (M-PT; GA = 33–35 weeks, N = 18). Arm/hand preference (preferred/non-preferred) was determined through object interactions and the brain hemispheres were designated accordingly. White matter alterations were assessed using diffusion tensor imaging in nine areas, and movement segmentation of the body-parts head, shoulder, elbow, and wrist were registered during a unimanual goal-directed task. Increased movement segmentation was demonstrated consistently on the preferred side in the E-PT group compared with the term born group. Also compared with the term born peers, the E-PT group demonstrated reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in the cerebral peduncle (targeting the corticospinal tract) in the hemisphere on the non-preferred side and in the splenium of corpus callosum. In contrast, in the anterior internal capsule on the preferred side, the E-PT group had increased FA. Lower FA in the cerebral peduncle, but higher FA in the anterior internal capsule, was associated with increased movement segmentation across body-parts in a contralateral manner. The results suggest that impaired development of sensorimotor tracts in E-PT children could explain a sub-optimal spatiotemporal organization of upper-limb movements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
diffusion tensor imaging, anisotropy, sensorimotor, corticospinal, internal capsule, laterality;
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Radiology; Psychology; Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139528 (URN)10.1002/hbm.23714 (DOI)000417002000017 ()28685893 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-179
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Rönnqvist, L. (2017). Long-term effect of a very preterm birth on sport activities, laterality and cognitive functioning in early school age children. Paper presented at Abstracts of the 29th Annual Meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), 17–20 May 2017, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 59(144), 44, Article ID S2,.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term effect of a very preterm birth on sport activities, laterality and cognitive functioning in early school age children
2017 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, no 144, p. 44-, article id S2Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Neuro-motor impairments are commonly described in children born very preterm. Our purpose was to examine whether children born preterm differ concerning choice and amount of sport activities, laterality, and cognitive functioning in comparison to term born.

METHOD: A sample of 130 children, investigated at early school-age (mean = 7.8y); categorized into three groups based on gestational age (GA); 66 children term born (FT; GA 39 – 42w), 33 moderately preterm (M-PT; GA 34 – 36w), and 31 very preterm (V-PT; GA 23 – 33w). Sport activities were perceived from parents’ ratings; Activities scale/Child behavior checklist, Laterality Index (LI); by a modified Edinburgh Handedness inventory, and cognitive functioning by WISC-IV.

RESULTS: Children born M-PT performed comparable to FT, as regards to sport activities and cognitive performance. Children born V-PT had significantly poorer full scale IQ, lower sport performance, fewer sport activities, and participated in more individual sport activities in comparison to FT and M-PT. V-PT children were also less lateralized in comparison to FT and M-PT born.  Additionally, a significant positive correlation was found between LI and number of sport activities for the V-PT children, not found for the FT or M-PT.

CONCLUSUON: A very preterm birth seems to generate long-term effects on amount and choice of sport activities, side preference and cognitive functioning. Thus, more focus should be paid to children born very preterm to identify deviations in their early sport engagement and activities; consequently, to motivate and provide improvements in their sport activities, physical performance, and cognitive functioning.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Pediatrics; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138472 (URN)DOI: 10.1111/dmcn.13455 (DOI)
Conference
Abstracts of the 29th Annual Meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), 17–20 May 2017, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-179)
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Grip, H., Johansson, A.-M., Selling, J., Rönnqvist, L., Boraxbekk, C.-J. & Häger, C. (2017). Three dimensional kinematic analyses of finger movement control and association to brain activity responses: A pilot study on healthy individuals. Gait & Posture, 57, 355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three dimensional kinematic analyses of finger movement control and association to brain activity responses: A pilot study on healthy individuals
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2017 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 57, p. 355-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: An increased knowledge of how the brain control finger movements give us keys to understand the recovery of motor function after a brain injury. This knowledge is crucial for the development of reliable and valid assessment methods in the clinical evaluation of hand function.

Research question: How are individual finger movements represented in the brain? Investigating the associations between kinematics and brain activity responses in healthy individuals.

Methods: Keeping the others still. Finger movements were performed lying in the MR scanner in order to register brain activity response during the task. Optoelectronic cameras simultaneously monitored the positions of reflective markers affixed to each finger. The marker position data were used to calculate each finger's movement frequency (MF),  movement independence (“Individuation Index”, II), stationary ability (Stationarity Index, SI)[1][1]. fMRI data was analyzed by contrasting the finger movements against its active rest.

Results: Preliminary analyses showed that (1) the finger movements primarily activate sensorimotor areas in the contralateral hemisphere (Fig. 1A), (2) that use of kinematic parameters in the fMRI analyses improved spatial specificity and (3) II engage a number of cortical areas, while MF engage fewer areas (Fig. 1B–D). Further analyses will further explore activations maps for each individual finger.

Discussion: The inclusion of movement parameters in the fMRI analyses improves the specificity in the derived activation map, increasing the interpretability of the neural correlates of movement control. This advancement carries the promise for the development of better assessment methods of the recovery of function post-stroke with usability in rehabilitation practices.

National Category
Physiotherapy Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Psychology
Research subject
physiotherapy; Radiology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139887 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.06.464 (DOI)
Note

Supplement 1, Meeting abstract P110

Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A.-M., Domellöf, E. & Rönnqvist, L. (2016). Associations between manual dexterity scores from the M-ABC 2 and kinematic properties of goal-directed upper-limb movements and in school-aged children born preterm. In: Challenge the Boundaries: . Paper presented at International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities Stockholm 1–4 June 2016 (pp. P-Fr-135).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between manual dexterity scores from the M-ABC 2 and kinematic properties of goal-directed upper-limb movements and in school-aged children born preterm
2016 (English)In: Challenge the Boundaries, 2016, p. P-Fr-135-Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background

Children born preterm (PT; <38 gestational weeks, GW) are frequently reported to have deviations in motor proficiency. Most studies use standardized test batteries to determine motor function in these children. Few studies have however examined the relations between test battery outcomes and outcomes from more detailed movement analysis.

Aim

To investigate associations between outcomes on the manual dexterity subtests from the Movement-ABC 2 with detailed 3D kinematic registrations during performance of a sensorimotor task with demands on fine motor skills and precision in school-aged children born PT and a comparison group born at full-term (FT).

Methods

As part of an ongoing quasi-longitudinal study, 7-8 year old children born PT (< 36 GW; n = 17) and an aged matched typically developing comparison group (n = 19) performed the M-ABC 2 and a fine motor task where 3D kinematic registration technique was applied. M-ABC 2 scaled scores from the manual dexterity index (MDI) were correlated with kinematic parameters sensitive to planning and on-line control (movement units, distance and speed). Differences between the PT and FT group were also analyzed.

Results

Preliminary analyses show no group differences on the outcomes from the 3D kinematic analyses but differences were evident on two (peg-board and follow-track) of the subtests constituting the MDI and the MDI where children born PT have lower scores than FT. For both groups but in different ways, within-group correlations show some associations between extracted kinematic properties and dexterity outcomes.

Conclusions

As the groups differed on the MDI outcomes it is surprising that none were found on the kinematic properties examined. Further, relatively few associations were found between the kinematic and M-ABC 2 outcomes. Investigation of the influence cognitive and executive functions have on these performances may offer explanations for this inconsistency

National Category
Psychology Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Psychology; Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125483 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities Stockholm 1–4 June 2016
Funder
Swedish Research Council, Dnr:2011-179
Available from: 2016-09-13 Created: 2016-09-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07
Rönnqvist, L., Domellöf, E., Johansson, A.-M., Faroogi, A., Domellöf, M., Riklund, K., . . . Birgander, R. (2016). Effects of twin-births on IQ, handedness, and brain volumes in 8-years-old preterm born twins and matched singletons: a pilot study. Paper presented at International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities, Stockholm 1–4 June 2016. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 58(S6), 57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of twin-births on IQ, handedness, and brain volumes in 8-years-old preterm born twins and matched singletons: a pilot study
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2016 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 58, no S6, p. 57-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Children born preterm have a high prevalence of long-term cognitive and behavioral disturbances. Still, studies of how preterm-twin-births may effect brain maturation and thus, contribute to long-term effects on brain-behavioral development and functions are rare.

Aim: To investigate whether brain volumes differ between twin (TPB) and singleton preterm born (SPB) and full-term born children (FTB) and associate to long-term cognitive and behavioral outcomes as well as to gestational age (GA), birth weight (BW) and head circumference (BHC) at birth.

Method: A sample of 22 twin born preterm (Mean GA=32.1, BW=1781), 23 matched singletons preterm (Mean GA=31.8, BW=1751), and 22 full-term singletons were included. All children were investigated by means of their cognition functions (WISC-IV), handedness performance index and brain volumes (3 Tesla MRI) at early school ages (M=7.8y) in 40 children (9 TPB, 10 SPB, 21 FTB).

Results: The FTB-children performed better than both TPB and SPB on cognitive performance, and showed higher IQ. Brain volumes, especially Gray matter were stronger associated with IQ in the twins. Furthermore it was found that the SPB singletons had smaller Total Brain volume and less Grey Matter than FTB. The twins showed a higher prevalence of non-right handedness associated to GA, than both SPB and FTB. Independently of birth status, GA, BW and BHC were found to correlate positively with IQ, Total Brain volume, and Gray-and White matter volumes.

Conclusion: Discordant handedness in TPB children and associations to lower GA indicate effect of twin-births on early functional laterality. The overall associations found between low GA/BW and smaller BHC at birth in preterm born and associations with lower IQ and smaller brain volumes at 8-y indicate that a very preterm birth are a higher predictor for long-term effects on brain development and cognitive performance than twin-birth per se.

National Category
Pediatrics Psychology Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126397 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.126_13241 (DOI)
Conference
International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities, Stockholm 1–4 June 2016
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-179
Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A.-M., Grip, H., Strong, A., Selling, J., Rönnqvist, L., Boraxbekk, C.-J. & Häger, C. (2016). Finger movement control and associated brain activity responses post-stroke. In: XXI ISEK Congress: . Paper presented at The International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Finger movement control and associated brain activity responses post-stroke
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2016 (English)In: XXI ISEK Congress, 2016Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Impaired finger dexterity is common after stroke, often affecting activities of daily living. Knowledge of kinematic characteristics and of underlying neurological mechanisms of such impairments is important to understand functional recovery. This study aims to investigate finger movement control and related brain activity patterns post-stroke (PS). METHODS: Data from a subsample including 9 participants PS with residual hemiparesis affecting manual dexterity (M age- 66; 3 female) and 12 able-bodied control (C) participants (M age- 65; 3 female) were analyzed. Two series of self-paced cyclic finger extension-flexion movements in random order were performed for each hand (4 series with vision, V, and 4 without vision, NV). Optoelectronic cameras monitored the 3D movement of markers affixed to the fingertips. Motion data was used to calculate each finger's individuation index (II), reflecting movement independence, each finger's Stationarity index (SI), reflecting the ability to keep the finger still while another moves [1] and Movement frequency (MF). Functional magnetic resonance imaging, with simultaneous movement recording, was used to investigate brain activity patterns in relation to the kinematic parameters. II, SI, MF and the effect of vision were analyzed for the 4th digit. RESULTS: A factorial ANOVA 2 [group] x 2 [condition] x 2 [side] x [index type] showed an effect for group (p < .0001; PS < C); condition (p < .01; NV < V); side (p < .0001; affected/non-preferred < non-affected/preferred); and index type (p < .0001; SI < II). An interaction between group and side (p < .01) showed that indices of the affected side were lower compared to the non-affected side within the PS group and compared to both sides in the C group. No significant effects were apparent for MF but significant correlations were found between the indices and MF that were restricted to the PS group alone (over all conditions- r = -0.22; p < .01; within the NV condition- r = -0.19; p < .01; within the affected side r = -0.15; p < .05; and within the SI categorization r = -0.14; p < .05). Furthermore, within NV for the non-affected hand on the SI alone (r = -0.54; p < .05). All indicate that slower movements had higher indices. DISCUSSION: The associations between slower MF and higher index values within the PS group were located to conditions with increased difficulty (NV, affected side, and SI). Thus, reducing speed may be a selected strategy to increase control of finger movements PS when the demand on motor control is high. Further, with the applied calculation of finger movement independence we were able detect group differences, side differences within the PS group, and a positive effect of vision of the hands during performance. This indicates that this calculation is a sensitive measure that could be used to study the effects of stroke and to monitor progression in motor recovery. [1] Häger-Ross & Schieber, 2000, J Neurosci 20:8542-50

National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128988 (URN)
Conference
The International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology
Projects
http://www.umu.se/sok/forskningsdatabasen/visa-forskningsprojekt?code=534&currentView=base&doSearch=&scbCode=&searchString=&uid=chha0003&guiseId=78497&orgId=d8a4ce60e452301d20c1259fb8263ff75bebcfdc&name=Charlotte%20H%C3%A4ger
Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09
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