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Eriksson, Maria E., Associate ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2038-4892
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Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Michelson, I. H., Ingvarsson, P. K., Robinson, K. M., Edlund, E., Eriksson, M. E., Nilsson, O. & Jansson, S. (2018). Autumn senescence in aspen is not triggered by day length. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 162(1), 123-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autumn senescence in aspen is not triggered by day length
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2018 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 162, no 1, p. 123-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Autumn senescence in mature aspens, grown under natural conditions, is initiated at almost the same date every year. The mechanism of such precise timing is not understood but we have previously shown that the signal must be derived from light. We studied variation in bud set and autumn senescence in a collection of 116 natural Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula) genotypes, from 12 populations in Sweden and planted in one northern and one southern common garden, to test the hypothesis that onset of autumn senescence is triggered by day length. We confirmed that, although bud set seemed to be triggered by a critical photoperiod/day length, other factors may influence it. The data on initiation of autumn senescence, on the other hand, were incompatible with the trigger being the day length per se, hence the trigger must be some other light-dependent factor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143636 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12593 (DOI)000418236000008 ()28591431 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Edwards, K. D., Takata, N., Johansson, M., Jurca, M., Novak, O., Henykova, E., . . . Eriksson, M. E. (2018). Circadian clock components control daily growth activities by modulating cytokinin levels and cell division-associated gene expression in Populus trees. Plant, Cell and Environment, 41(6), 1468-1482
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circadian clock components control daily growth activities by modulating cytokinin levels and cell division-associated gene expression in Populus trees
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2018 (English)In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1468-1482Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trees are carbon dioxide sinks and major producers of terrestrial biomass with distinct seasonal growth patterns. Circadian clocks enable the coordination of physiological and biochemical temporal activities, optimally regulating multiple traits including growth. To dissect the clock's role in growth, we analysed Populus tremula x P. tremuloides trees with impaired clock function due to down-regulation of central clock components. late elongated hypocotyl (lhy-10) trees, in which expression of LHY1 and LHY2 is reduced by RNAi, have a short free-running period and show disrupted temporal regulation of gene expression and reduced growth, producing 30-40% less biomass than wild-type trees. Genes important in growth regulation were expressed with an earlier phase in lhy-10, and CYCLIN D3 expression was misaligned and arrhythmic. Levels of cytokinins were lower in lhy-10 trees, which also showed a change in the time of peak expression of genes associated with cell division and growth. However, auxin levels were not altered in lhy-10 trees, and the size of the lignification zone in the stem showed a relative increase. The reduced growth rate and anatomical features of lhy-10 trees were mainly caused by misregulation of cell division, which may have resulted from impaired clock function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
biomass production, cell division, circadian clock, cytokinin, growth, lignification, photoperiod
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150887 (URN)10.1111/pce.13185 (DOI)000434162400020 ()29520862 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045241946 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
Ding, J., Böhlenius, H., Rühl, M. G., Chen, P., Sane, S., Zambrano, J. A., . . . Eriksson, M. E. (2018). GIGANTEA-like genes control seasonal growth cessation in Populus. New Phytologist, 218(4), 1491-1503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GIGANTEA-like genes control seasonal growth cessation in Populus
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2018 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 218, no 4, p. 1491-1503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Survival of trees growing in temperate zones requires cycling between active growth and dormancy. This involves growth cessation in the autumn triggered by a photoperiod shorter than the critical day length. Variations in GIGANTEA (GI)-like genes have been associated with phenology in a range of different tree species, but characterization of the functions of these genes in the process is still lacking. We describe the identification of the Populus orthologs of GI and their critical role in short-day-induced growth cessation. Using ectopic expression and silencing, gene expression analysis, protein interaction and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that PttGIs are likely to act in a complex with PttFKF1s (FLAVIN-BINDING, KELCH REPEAT, F-BOX 1) and PttCDFs (CYCLING DOF FACTOR) to control the expression of PttFT2, the key gene regulating short-day-induced growth cessation in Populus. In contrast to Arabidopsis, in which the GI-CONSTANS (CO)-FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) regulon is a crucial day-length sensor for flowering time, our study suggests that, in Populus, PttCO-independent regulation of PttFT2 by PttGI is more important in the photoperiodic control of growth cessation and bud set.

Keywords
Populus, FLOWERING LOCUS (FT), GIGANTEA (GI), growth cessation, photoperiod
National Category
Botany Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151217 (URN)10.1111/nph.15087 (DOI)000437029600025 ()29532940 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85043536118 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Norén, L., Kindgren, P., Stachula, P., Rühl, M., Eriksson, M. E., Hurry, V. & Strand, Å. (2016). Circadian and Plastid Signaling Pathways Are Integrated to Ensure Correct Expression of the CBF and COR Genes during Photoperiodic Growth. Plant Physiology, 171(2), 1392-1406
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circadian and Plastid Signaling Pathways Are Integrated to Ensure Correct Expression of the CBF and COR Genes during Photoperiodic Growth
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2016 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 171, no 2, p. 1392-1406Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The circadian clock synchronizes a wide range of biological processes with the day/night cycle, and correct circadian regulation is essential for photosynthetic activity and plant growth. We describe here a mechanism where a plastid signal converges with the circadian clock to fine-tune the regulation of nuclear gene expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Diurnal oscillations of tetrapyrrole levels in the chloroplasts contribute to the regulation of the nucleus-encoded transcription factors C-REPEAT BINDING FACTORS (CBFs). The plastid signal triggered by tetrapyrrole accumulation inhibits the activity of cytosolic HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN90 and, as a consequence, the maturation and stability of the clock component ZEITLUPE (ZTL). ZTL negatively regulates the transcription factor LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) and PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR5 (PRR5). Thus, low levels of ZTL result in a HY5- and PRR5-mediated repression of CBF3 and PRR5-mediated repression of CBF1 and CBF2 expression. The plastid signal thereby contributes to the rhythm of CBF expression and the downstream COLD RESPONSIVE expression during day/night cycles. These findings provide insight into how plastid signals converge with, and impact upon, the activity of well-defined clock components involved in circadian regulation.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125464 (URN)10.1104/pp.16.00374 (DOI)000380699200048 ()27208227 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
McWatters, H. G. (2016). Plant Circadian Rhythms. In: Encyclopedia of Life Sciences: Biological Sciences (pp. 1-10). Chichester: John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plant Circadian Rhythms
2016 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Life Sciences: Biological Sciences, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2016, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Circadian clocks are found in most eukaryotic organisms. By allowing anticipation of daily and seasonal changes, they enable coordination of metabolism and lifecycle with the natural rhythms of the environment. Plant circadian rhythms are generated by a series of interlocking feedback loops of RNA (ribonucleic acid) and protein expression that respond to environmental cycles of light and temperature. They control essential processes in the plant's development, such as the transition to flowering or growth cessation, and thus influence yield, plant growth and biomass production. Many components of the clock are conserved across a wide variety of plant species and thus research in Arabidopsis translates into an understanding of the clock in agricultural crops or long‐living deciduous tree species such as hybrid aspen.

Key Concepts

  • Circadian clocks are found in both eukaryotes and bacteria.
  • Circadian clocks have a free‐running periodicity of about 24 h but are normally entrained to environmental cycles of light and temperature.
  • Temperature compensation is a key feature of the circadian clock and thus the free‐running period length varies relatively little across the range of ambient temperature.
  • The clock underlies many aspects of plant metabolism and physiology because it can detect and respond to both short‐term (the day:night cycle) and long‐term (the pattern of daylength variation across a year) changes in light and temperature.
  • The circadian clock of plants is made up of a series of interconnected transcription‐translation feedback loops (TTFLs) governing cycles of mRNA and protein expression.
  • Every plant cell contains its own clock. Clocks in different cells may be entrained independently of one another, although there appears to be a hierarchy of clocks within a plant dominated by the apex.
  • Plants with malfunctioning clocks suffer reductions in growth.
  • Many of the key components of the plant clock first described in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana are conserved across a wide range of species including trees such as hybrid aspen.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2016
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151228 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2018-08-30
Anderson, J. V. (Ed.). (2015). Role of the Circadian Clock in Cold Acclimation and Winter Dormancy in Perennial Plants. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of the Circadian Clock in Cold Acclimation and Winter Dormancy in Perennial Plants
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2015 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Seasonal variation is a strong cue directing the growth and development of plants. It is particularly important for perennials growing in temperate and boreal regions where woody plants must become dormant to survive freezing winter temperatures. Shortening of the photoperiod induces growth cessation, bud set and a first degree of cold acclimation in most woody plants. The subsequent drop in temperature then produces a greater tolerance to cold and, in deciduous trees, leaf senescence and fall. Trees must time their periods of dormancy accurately with their environment. Circadian clocks underlie this ability, allowing organisms to predict regular, daily changes in their environment as well as longer term seasonal changes. This chapter provides an update on the plant clock in a model annual, thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), and further summarizes recent advances about the clock in perennial plants and its involvement in their annual growth cycles, which allows trees to withstand cold and freezing temperatures. Moreover, we outline our views on areas where future work on the circadian clock is necessary to gain insight into the life of a tree.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015. p. 24
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151226 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-14451-1_3 (DOI)978-3-319-14451-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-14450-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2018-08-30
Eriksson, M. E., Hoffman, D., Kaduk, M., Mauriat, M. & Moritz, T. (2015). Transgenic hybrid aspen trees with increased gibberellin (GA) concentrations suggest that GA acts in parallel with FLOWERING LOCUS T2 to control shoot elongation. New Phytologist, 205(3), 1288-1295
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transgenic hybrid aspen trees with increased gibberellin (GA) concentrations suggest that GA acts in parallel with FLOWERING LOCUS T2 to control shoot elongation
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2015 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 205, no 3, p. 1288-1295Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bioactive gibberellins (GAs) have been implicated in short day (SD)-induced growth cessation in Populus, because exogenous applications of bioactive GAs to hybrid aspens (Populus tremulaxtremuloides) under SD conditions delay growth cessation. However, this effect diminishes with time, suggesting that plants may cease growth following exposure to SDs due to a reduction in sensitivity to GAs.

In order to validate and further explore the role of GAs in growth cessation, we perturbed GA biosynthesis or signalling in hybrid aspen plants by overexpressing AtGA20ox1, AtGA2ox2 and PttGID1.3 (encoding GA biosynthesis enzymes and a GA receptor).

We found trees with elevated concentrations of bioactive GA, due to overexpression of AtGA20ox1, continued to grow in SD conditions and were insensitive to the level of FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2) expression. As transgenic plants overexpressing the PttGID1.3 GA receptor responded in a wild-type (WT) manner to SD conditions, this insensitivity did not result from limited receptor availability.

As high concentrations of bioactive GA during SD conditions were sufficient to sustain shoot elongation growth in hybrid aspen trees, independent of FT2 expression levels, we conclude elongation growth in trees is regulated by both GA- and long day-responsive pathways, similar to the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Keywords
Flowering Locus T2 (FT2), gibberellins (GA), growth cessation, photoperiod, Populus
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100766 (URN)10.1111/nph.13144 (DOI)000348730600038 ()25382585 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-04-26 Created: 2015-03-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M., Takata, N., Ibáñez, C. & Eriksson, M. E. (2014). Monitoring seasonal bud set, bud burst, and cold hardiness in Populus. In: Dorothee Steiger (Ed.), Plant Circadian Networks: Methods and Protocols (pp. 313-324). New York: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 1158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring seasonal bud set, bud burst, and cold hardiness in Populus
2014 (English)In: Plant Circadian Networks: Methods and Protocols / [ed] Dorothee Steiger, New York: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2014, Vol. 1158, p. 313-324Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Using a perennial model plant allows the study of reoccurring seasonal events in a way that is not possible using a fast-growing annual such as Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). In this study, we present a hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides) as our perennial model plant. These plants can be grown in growth chambers to shorten growth periods and manipulate day length and temperature in ways that would be impossible under natural conditions. In addition, the use of growth chambers allows easy monitoring of height and diameter expansion, accelerating the collection of data from new strategies that allow evaluation of promoters or inhibitors of growth. Here, we describe how to study and quantify responses to seasonal changes (mainly using P. tremula × P. tremuloides) by measuring growth rate and key events under different photoperiodic cycles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2014
Series
Methods in Molecular Biology. Methods and Protocols, ISSN 1064-3745 ; 1158
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101093 (URN)10.1007/978-1-4939-0700-7_21 (DOI)24792061 (PubMedID)978-1-4939-0699-4 (ISBN)978-1-4939-0700-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-03-19 Created: 2015-03-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M., Ibáñez, C., Takata, N. & Eriksson, M. E. (2014). The perennial clock is an essential timer for seasonal growth events and cold hardiness. In: Staiger D (Ed.), Plant Circadian Networks: Methods in Molecular Biology (pp. 297-311). New York: Springer, 1158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The perennial clock is an essential timer for seasonal growth events and cold hardiness
2014 (English)In: Plant Circadian Networks: Methods in Molecular Biology / [ed] Staiger D, New York: Springer, 2014, Vol. 1158, p. 297-311Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Over the last several decades, changes in global temperatures have led to changes in local environments affecting the growth conditions for many species. This is a trend that makes it even more important to understand how plants respond to local variations and seasonal changes in climate. To detect daily and seasonal changes as well as acute stress factors such as cold and drought, plants rely on a circadian clock. This chapter introduces the current knowledge and literature about the setup and function of the circadian clock in various tree and perennial species, with a focus on the Populus genus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2014
Series
Methods in molecular biology, ISSN 1064-3745 ; 1158
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101094 (URN)10.1007/978-1-4939-0700-7_20 (DOI)24792060 (PubMedID)978-1-4939-0700-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-03-19 Created: 2015-03-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Takata, N. & Eriksson, M. E. (2012). A simple and efficient transient transformation for hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides). Plant Methods, 8, 30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A simple and efficient transient transformation for hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides)
2012 (English)In: Plant Methods, ISSN 1746-4811, E-ISSN 1746-4811, Vol. 8, p. 30-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The genus Populus is accepted as a model system for molecular tree biology. To investigate gene functions in Populus spp. trees, generating stable transgenic lines is the common technique for functional genetic studies. However, a limited number of genes have been targeted due to the lengthy transgenic process. Transient transformation assays complementing stable transformation have significant advantages for rapid in vivo assessment of gene function. The aim of this study is to develop a simple and efficient transient transformation for hybrid aspen and to provide its potential applications for functional genomic approaches. Results: We developed an in planta transient transformation assay for young hybrid aspen cuttings using Agrobacterium-mediated vacuum infiltration. The transformation conditions such as the infiltration medium, the presence of a surfactant, the phase of bacterial growth and bacterial density were optimized to achieve a higher transformation efficiency in young aspen leaves. The Agrobacterium infiltration assay successfully transformed various cell types in leaf tissues. Intracellular localization of four aspen genes was confirmed in homologous Populus spp. using fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein. Protein-protein interaction was detected in transiently co-transformed cells with bimolecular fluorescence complementation technique. In vivo promoter activity was monitored over a few days in aspen cuttings that were transformed with luciferase reporter gene driven by a circadian clock promoter. Conclusions: The Agrobacterium infiltration assay developed here is a simple and enhanced throughput method that requires minimum handling and short transgenic process. This method will facilitate functional analyses of Populus genes in a homologous plant system.

Keywords
populus; agrobacterium-mediated vacuum infiltration; transient expression; subcellular localization; co-localization; luciferase reporter assay
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-60655 (URN)10.1186/1746-4811-8-30 (DOI)000308916200001 ()
Available from: 2012-10-26 Created: 2012-10-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Projects
The Role of NFX1 like proteins in the Circadian Oscillator and in Plant Stress Responses [2011-04706_VR]; Umeå UniversityUsing trees to explore the role of the circadian clock in salt- and drought stress. [2014-04291_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2038-4892

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