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Publications (10 of 64) Show all publications
Norén, L., Kindgren, P., Stachula, P., Rühl, M., Eriksson, M. E., Hurry, V. & Strand, Å. (2016). Circadian and Plastid Signaling Pathways Are Integrated to Ensure Correct Expression of the CBF and COR Genes during Photoperiodic Growth. Plant Physiology, 171(2), 1392-1406
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circadian and Plastid Signaling Pathways Are Integrated to Ensure Correct Expression of the CBF and COR Genes during Photoperiodic Growth
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2016 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 171, no 2, p. 1392-1406Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The circadian clock synchronizes a wide range of biological processes with the day/night cycle, and correct circadian regulation is essential for photosynthetic activity and plant growth. We describe here a mechanism where a plastid signal converges with the circadian clock to fine-tune the regulation of nuclear gene expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Diurnal oscillations of tetrapyrrole levels in the chloroplasts contribute to the regulation of the nucleus-encoded transcription factors C-REPEAT BINDING FACTORS (CBFs). The plastid signal triggered by tetrapyrrole accumulation inhibits the activity of cytosolic HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN90 and, as a consequence, the maturation and stability of the clock component ZEITLUPE (ZTL). ZTL negatively regulates the transcription factor LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) and PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR5 (PRR5). Thus, low levels of ZTL result in a HY5- and PRR5-mediated repression of CBF3 and PRR5-mediated repression of CBF1 and CBF2 expression. The plastid signal thereby contributes to the rhythm of CBF expression and the downstream COLD RESPONSIVE expression during day/night cycles. These findings provide insight into how plastid signals converge with, and impact upon, the activity of well-defined clock components involved in circadian regulation.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125464 (URN)10.1104/pp.16.00374 (DOI)000380699200048 ()27208227 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Näsholm, T., Högberg, P., Franklin, O., Metcalfe, D., Keel, S. G., Campbell, C., . . . Högberg, M. N. (2013). Are ectomycorrhizal fungi alleviating or aggravating nitrogen limitation of tree growth in boreal forests?. New Phytologist, 198(1), 214-221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are ectomycorrhizal fungi alleviating or aggravating nitrogen limitation of tree growth in boreal forests?
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2013 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 198, no 1, p. 214-221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Symbioses between plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi are thought to enhance plant uptake of nutrients through a favourable exchange for photosynthates. Ectomycorrhizal fungi are considered to play this vital role for trees in nitrogen (N)-limited boreal forests. We followed symbiotic carbon (C)N exchange in a large-scale boreal pine forest experiment by tracing 13CO2 absorbed through tree photosynthesis and 15N injected into a soil layer in which ectomycorrhizal fungi dominate the microbial community. We detected little 15N in tree canopies, but high levels in soil microbes and in mycorrhizal root tips, illustrating effective soil N immobilization, especially in late summer, when tree belowground C allocation was high. Additions of N fertilizer to the soil before labelling shifted the incorporation of 15N from soil microbes and root tips to tree foliage. These results were tested in a model for CN exchange between trees and mycorrhizal fungi, suggesting that ectomycorrhizal fungi transfer small fractions of absorbed N to trees under N-limited conditions, but larger fractions if more N is available. We suggest that greater allocation of C from trees to ectomycorrhizal fungi increases N retention in soil mycelium, driving boreal forests towards more severe N limitation at low N supply.

Keywords
field experiment, 13C-15N pulse labelling, modelling, mycorrhiza, nitrogen immobilization, nitrogen limitation, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67787 (URN)10.1111/nph.12139 (DOI)000315440400022 ()
Available from: 2013-04-04 Created: 2013-04-03 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ivanov, A. G., Rosso, D., Savitch, L. V., Stachula, P., Rosembert, M., Öquist, G., . . . Huener, N. P. (2012). Implications of alternative electron sinks in increased resistance of PSII and PSI photochemistry to high light stress in cold-acclimated Arabidopsis thaliana. Photosynthesis Research, 113(1-3), 191-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implications of alternative electron sinks in increased resistance of PSII and PSI photochemistry to high light stress in cold-acclimated Arabidopsis thaliana
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2012 (English)In: Photosynthesis Research, ISSN 0166-8595, E-ISSN 1573-5079, Vol. 113, no 1-3, p. 191-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exposure of control (non-hardened) Arabidopsis leaves to high light stress at 5 A degrees C resulted in a decrease of both photosystem II (PSII) (45 %) and Photosystem I (PSI) (35 %) photochemical efficiencies compared to non-treated plants. In contrast, cold-acclimated (CA) leaves exhibited only 35 and 22 % decrease of PSII and PSI photochemistry, respectively, under the same conditions. This was accompanied by an accelerated rate of P700(+) re-reduction, indicating an up-regulation of PSI-dependent cyclic electron transport (CET). Interestingly, the expression of the NDH-H gene and the relative abundance of the Ndh-H polypeptide, representing the NDH-complex, decreased as a result of exposure to low temperatures. This indicates that the NDH-dependent CET pathway cannot be involved and the overall stimulation of CET in CA plants is due to up-regulation of the ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase, antimycin A-sensitive CET pathway. The lower abundance of NDH complex also implies lower activity of the chlororespiratory pathway in CA plants, although the expression level and overall abundance of the other well-characterized component involved in chlororespiration, the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), was up-regulated at low temperatures. This suggests increased PTOX-mediated alternative electron flow to oxygen in plants exposed to low temperatures. Indeed, the estimated proportion of O-2-dependent linear electron transport not utilized in carbon assimilation and not directed to photorespiration was twofold higher in CA Arabidopsis. The possible involvement of alternative electron transport pathways in inducing greater resistance of both PSII and PSI to high light stress in CA plants is discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: , 2012
Keywords
Alternative electron flows, Cold acclimation, Photoprotection, Photosystem II, Photosystem I, PTOX
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-60326 (URN)10.1007/s11120-012-9769-y (DOI)000308188800014 ()
Available from: 2012-11-09 Created: 2012-10-09 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Searle, S. Y., Thomas, S., Griffin, K. L., Horton, T., Kornfeld, A., Yakir, D., . . . Turnbull, M. H. (2011). Leaf respiration and alternative oxidase in field-grown alpine grasses respond to natural changes in temperature and light. New Phytologist, 189(4), 1027-1039
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leaf respiration and alternative oxidase in field-grown alpine grasses respond to natural changes in temperature and light
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2011 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 189, no 4, p. 1027-1039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

• We report the first investigation of changes in electron partitioning via the alternative respiratory pathway (AP) and alternative oxidase (AOX) protein abundance in field-grown plants and their role in seasonal acclimation of respiration. • We sampled two alpine grasses native to New Zealand, Chionochloa rubra and Chionochloa pallens, from field sites of different altitudes, over 1 yr and also intensively over a 2-wk period. • In both species, respiration acclimated to seasonal changes in temperature through changes in basal capacity (R₁₀) but not temperature sensitivity (E₀). In C. pallens, acclimation of respiration may be associated with a higher AOX : cytochrome c oxidase (COX) protein abundance ratio. Oxygen isotope discrimination (D), which reflects relative changes in AP electron partitioning, correlated positively with daily integrated photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in both species over seasonal timescales. Respiratory parameters, the AOX : COX protein ratio and D were stable over a 2-wk period, during which significant temperature changes were experienced in the field. • We conclude that respiration in Chionochloa spp. acclimates strongly to seasonal, but not to short-term, temperature variation. Alternative oxidase appears to be involved in the plant response to both seasonal changes in temperature and daily changes in light, highlighting the complexity of the function of AOX in the field.

Keywords
acclimation;alternative oxidase (AOX);Chionochloa;cytochrome oxidase;leaf respiration;oxygen isotope discrimination;photosynthetically active radiation (PAR);seasonal variation
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-41025 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03557.x (DOI)21128944 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-16 Created: 2011-03-16 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Atkinson, L. J., Campbell, C. D., Zaragoza-Castells, J., Hurry, V. & Atkin, O. K. (2010). Impact of growth temperature on scaling relationships linking photosynthetic metabolism to leaf functional traits. Functional Ecology, 24(6), 1181-1191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of growth temperature on scaling relationships linking photosynthetic metabolism to leaf functional traits
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2010 (English)In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 1181-1191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1. Scaling relationships linking photosynthesis (A) to leaf traits are important for predicting vegetation patterns and plant-atmosphere carbon fluxes. Here, we investigated the impact of growth temperature on such scaling relationships.

2. We assessed whether changes in growth temperature systematically altered the slope and/or intercepts of log-log plots of A vs leaf mass per unit leaf area (LMA), nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations for 19 contrasting plant species grown hydroponically at four temperatures (7, 14, 21 and 28 degrees C) in controlled environment cabinets. Responses of 21 degrees C-grown pre-existing (PE) leaves experiencing a 10 day growth temperature (7, 14, 21 and 28 degrees C) treatment, and newly-developed (ND) leaves formed at each of the four new growth temperatures, were quantified. Irrespective of the growth temperature treatment, rates of light-saturated photosynthesis (A) were measured at 21 degrees C.

3. Changes in growth temperature altered the scaling between A and leaf traits in pre-existing (PE) leaves, with thermal history accounting for up to 17% and 31% of the variation on a mass and area basis, respectively. However, growth temperature played almost no role in accounting for scatter when comparisons were made of newly-developed (ND) leaves that form at each growth temperature.

4. Photosynthetic nitrogen and phosphorus use efficiency (PNUE and PPUE, respectively) decreased with increasing LMA. No systematic differences in temperature-mediated reductions in PNUE or PPUE of PE leaves were found among species.

5. Overall, these results highlight the importance of leaf development in determining the effects of sustained changes in growth temperature on scaling relationships linking photosynthesis to other leaf traits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2010
Keywords
acclimation, development, leaf mass per unit area, nitrogen, phosphorus, photosynthesis, photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, temperature
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109563 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2435.2010.01758.x (DOI)000284589400003 ()
Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-09-30 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Metcalfe, D. B., Lobo-do-Vale, R., Chaves, M. M., Maroco, J. P., Aragao, L. E. O., Malhi, Y., . . . Meir, P. (2010). Impacts of experimentally imposed drought on leaf respiration and morphology in an Amazon rain forest. Functional Ecology, 24(3), 524-533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impacts of experimentally imposed drought on leaf respiration and morphology in an Amazon rain forest
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2010 (English)In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 524-533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

P>1. The Amazon region may experience increasing moisture limitation over this century. Leaf dark respiration (R) is a key component of the Amazon rain forest carbon (C) cycle, but relatively little is known about its sensitivity to drought. 2. Here, we present measurements of R standardized to 25 degrees C and leaf morphology from different canopy heights over 5 years at a rain forest subject to a large-scale through-fall reduction (TFR) experiment, and nearby, unmodified Control forest, at the Caxiuana reserve in the eastern Amazon. 3. In all five post-treatment measurement campaigns, mean R at 25 degrees C was elevated in the TFR forest compared to the Control forest experiencing normal rainfall. After 5 years of the TFR treatment, R per unit leaf area and mass had increased by 65% and 42%, respectively, relative to pre-treatment means. In contrast, leaf area index (L) in the TFR forest was consistently lower than the Control, falling by 23% compared to the pre-treatment mean, largely because of a decline in specific leaf area (S). 4. The consistent and significant effects of the TFR treatment on R, L and S suggest that severe drought events in the Amazon, of the kind that may occur more frequently in future, could cause a substantial increase in canopy carbon dioxide emissions from this ecosystem to the atmosphere.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37319 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2435.2009.01683.x (DOI)000276508000005 ()
Available from: 2010-10-27 Created: 2010-10-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hogberg, M. N., Briones, M. J. I., Keel, S. G., Metcalfe, D. B., Campbell, C., Midwood, A. J., . . . Hogberg, P. (2010). Quantification of effects of season and nitrogen supply on tree below-ground carbon transfer to ectomycorrhizal fungi and other soil organisms in a boreal pine forest. New Phytologist, 187(2), 485-493
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of effects of season and nitrogen supply on tree below-ground carbon transfer to ectomycorrhizal fungi and other soil organisms in a boreal pine forest
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2010 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 187, no 2, p. 485-493Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

P>The flux of carbon from tree photosynthesis through roots to ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and other soil organisms is assumed to vary with season and with edaphic factors such as nitrogen availability, but these effects have not been quantified directly in the field. To address this deficiency, we conducted high temporal-resolution tracing of 13C from canopy photosynthesis to different groups of soil organisms in a young boreal Pinus sylvestris forest. There was a 500% higher below-ground allocation of plant C in the late (August) season compared with the early season (June). Labelled C was primarily found in fungal fatty acid biomarkers (and rarely in bacterial biomarkers), and in Collembola, but not in Acari and Enchytraeidae. The production of sporocarps of ECM fungi was totally dependent on allocation of recent photosynthate in the late season. There was no short-term (2 wk) effect of additions of N to the soil, but after 1 yr, there was a 60% reduction of below-ground C allocation to soil biota. Thus, organisms in forest soils, and their roles in ecosystem functions, appear highly sensitive to plant physiological responses to two major aspects of global change: changes in seasonal weather patterns and N eutrophication.

National Category
Biological Sciences Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37330 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03274.x (DOI)000279169900021 ()
Available from: 2010-10-27 Created: 2010-10-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ruelland, E., Vaultier, M.-N., Zachowski, A. & Hurry, V. (2009). Cold signalling and cold acclimation in plants. Advances in Botanical Research, 49(8), 35-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cold signalling and cold acclimation in plants
2009 (English)In: Advances in Botanical Research, ISSN 0065-2296, E-ISSN 2162-5948, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 35-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exposure to low temperatures is one of the most important plant abiotic stress factors. In this review we describe the damages that chilling and/or freezing temperatures can cause to plant cells. Confronted to these damages, some plants are able to adapt through mechanisms based on protein synthesis, membrane composition changes, and activation of active oxygen scavenging systems. These adaptive mechanisms rely in part on gene induction. The best understood genetic pathway leading to gene induction upon a temperature downshift is based on C-repeat-binding factors (CBF) activating promoters through the C-repeat (CRT) cis-element. Such activation of transcription factors suggests that cold, as a signal, has been transduced into the cells. Calcium entry is a major signalling event occurring immediately after a temperature downshift. The increase in cytosolic calcium will activate many enzymes, such as phospholipases and calcium dependent-protein kinases. A MAP-kinase module has been shown to be involved in the cold response. Ultimately, the activation of those signalling pathways leads to changes to the transcriptome. In this review we have focused on the genetic and signalling pathways activated early after cold exposure. Much of the data cited is from the model plant Arabidopsis but when possible evidence from other plants is presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2009
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-30815 (URN)10.1016/S0065-2296(08)00602-2 (DOI)
Note

ISBN: 9780123747358

Available from: 2010-01-18 Created: 2010-01-18 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lundmark, M., Hurry, V. & Lapointe, L. (2009). Low temperature maximizes growth of Crocus vernus (L.) Hill via changes in carbon partitioning and corm development.. Journal of Experimental Botany, 60(7), 2203-2213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low temperature maximizes growth of Crocus vernus (L.) Hill via changes in carbon partitioning and corm development.
2009 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 60, no 7, p. 2203-2213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Crocus vernus, a spring bulbous species, prolonged growth at low temperatures results in the development of larger perennial organs and delayed foliar senescence. Because corm growth is known to stop before the first visual sign of leaf senescence, it is clear that factors other than leaf duration alone determine final corm size. The aim of this study was to determine whether reduced growth at higher temperatures was due to decreased carbon import to the corm or to changes in the partitioning of this carbon once it had reached the corm. Plants were grown under two temperature regimes and the amount of carbon fixed, transported, and converted into a storable form in the corm, as well as the partitioning into soluble carbohydrates, starch, and the cell wall, were monitored during the growth cycle. The reduced growth at higher temperature could not be explained by a restriction in carbon supply or by a reduced ability to convert the carbon into starch. However, under the higher temperature regime, the plant allocated more carbon to cell wall material, and the amount of glucose within the corm declined earlier in the season. Hexose to sucrose ratios might control the duration of corm growth in C. vernus by influencing the timing of the cell division, elongation, and maturation phases. It is suggested that it is this shift in carbon partitioning, not limited carbon supply or leaf duration, which is responsible for the smaller final biomass of the corm at higher temperatures.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-23139 (URN)10.1093/jxb/erp103 (DOI)19403850 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-06-01 Created: 2009-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Atkin, O. K., Sherlock, D., Fitter, A. H., Jarvis, S., Hughes, J. K., Campbell, C., . . . Hodge, A. (2009). Temperature dependence of respiration in roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. New Phytologist, 182(1), 188-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temperature dependence of respiration in roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
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2009 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 182, no 1, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

* The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is ubiquitous, and the fungus represents a major pathway for carbon movement in the soil-plant system. Here, we investigated the impacts of AM colonization of Plantago lanceolata and temperature on the regulation of root respiration (R). * Warm-grown AM plants exhibited higher rates of R than did nonAM plants, irrespective of root mass. AM plants exhibited higher maximal rates of R (R(max)-R measured in the presence of an uncoupler and exogenous substrate) and greater proportional use of R(max) as a result of increased energy demand and/or substrate supply. The higher R values exhibited by AM plants were not associated with higher maximal rates of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) or protein abundance of either the COX or the alternative oxidase. * Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization had no effect on the short-term temperature dependence (Q(10)) of R. Cold-acclimated nonAM plants exhibited higher rates of R than their warm-grown nonAM counterparts. By contrast, chilling had a negligible effect on R of AM-plants. Thus, AM plants exhibited less cold acclimation than their nonAM counterparts. * Overall, these results highlight the way in which AM colonization alters the underlying components of respiratory metabolism and the response of root R to sustained changes in growth temperature.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-20884 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-8137.2008.02727.x (DOI)19140938 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-27 Created: 2009-03-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5151-5184

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