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Wilson, Timothy
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Lindbergh, L. & Wilson, T. (2018). Developments in Swedish Rental housing: unanticipated consequences of Public Municipal Housing Companies Act 2011. Competition Forum, 16(1), 19-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developments in Swedish Rental housing: unanticipated consequences of Public Municipal Housing Companies Act 2011
2018 (English)In: Competition Forum, ISSN 1320-0682, E-ISSN 2165-2228, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reflects some specific accommodations that have occurred in the Swedish rental sector as a consequence of Municipal Housing Companies (MHCs) complying with the Public Municipal Housing Companies Act of 2011, which required them to perform in a more business-like manner.  It was not explicitly noted, but undoubtedly assumed, that the municipal sector of housing would function much as before.  Unexpected consequences, however, have changed the competitive landscape.  Not only have MHCs been affected, but independent rental companies as well.  Further, tenants have not been particularly pleased with some of the developments.  Three cases triangulate the observations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Competitiveness, 2018
Keywords
Municipal Public Housing, Sweden, Companies Act of 2011, Business-Like, Unanticipated Changes
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153163 (URN)
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Lindbergh, L., Olofsson, T., Vesterberg, J., Andersson, S. & Wilson, T. (2018). Reflections on sustainable Ålidhem: a case study in Swedish municipal public housing refurbishment. Property Management, 36(2), 203-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflections on sustainable Ålidhem: a case study in Swedish municipal public housing refurbishment
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2018 (English)In: Property Management, ISSN 0263-7472, E-ISSN 1758-731X, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 203-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This work is initiated under the premise that reliable evaluation methods are necessary to ensure investments in energy conservation, and the purpose of this paper is to contribute to that literature. It describes some pilot changes and their impact in an actual field study oriented toward upgrading municipal public housing (MPH) units.

Design/methodology/approach: The research for this paper was connected to an MPH refurbishment project situated in northern Sweden. The overall energy efficiency goal within the project was a 40-50 percent reduction in the supplied energy for central electricity, domestic hot water and space heating. In order to evaluate if these goals were feasible, a measurement system was installed in a pilot building and in a neighboring building used as a reference. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the post-retrofit performance of the pilot building with the performance of the reference building when it was kept in its initial state (a comparison possible because both buildings had initial similarities).

Findings: Impacts could be quantified insofar as a reference (control) building in the same environment was sustained for comparison purposes. A 43 percent improvement was observed in energy utilization in the pilot building compared to its reference companion (99.8 vs 174.5 kWh/m2 per year). When the approach described herein was applied to new construction, the present goal of 65 kWh/m2 was approached as measured by Swedish standards.

Practical implications: Results should be of interest to academics in the housing field, professionals involved in refurbishment and residents themselves, renting MPH flats.

Originality/value: This study is unique in the following ways: first, it really was a field experiment with a control, thus it did not have any exogenous interference in interpreting results. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind. The second interesting characteristic was that results were subsequently used in the refurbishment of other buildings in the complex and in the construction of others. The major value of the paper may be associated with its timing. It comes at a time when the Kyoto agreement has raised concerns about sustainability, but also at a time when many buildings are facing a need for refurbishment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
Refurbishment, Energy Savings, Systematic Approach, Municipal Public Housing, Sweden
National Category
Business Administration Civil Engineering
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138657 (URN)10.1108/PM-04-2016-0017 (DOI)000428653800006 ()
Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Wilson, T. L. (2018). Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: have we forgotten something?. Business Horizons, 61(1), 47-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: have we forgotten something?
2018 (English)In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 47-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What's past is prologue. Or is it? The construction of the Empire State Building (ESB) was not only the fastest erection of a skyscraper ever, but the construction company that took on the job allegedly began with no equipment or supplies that would be adequate for the job. The project was completed ahead of schedule and under budget; instead of 1 year and 6 months as anticipated, it only took 1 year and 45 days. The costs totaled $24.7 million instead of the estimated $43 million. So, we ask, how was this possible and is there something we could learn? Based on a review of existing literature describing the history and construction of the ESB, we outline strategic, operational, and contextual explanations for what appears to be a truly successful megaproject. We illustrate how, for example, inspiration from Henry Ford's assembly line technique, the uniqueness of the logistics during the construction period, the economic decline of the Depression, and early ideas of concurrent engineering and fast-track construction enabled the success. Our conclusion is that there are lessons to be learned in going back to basics when tackling a megaproject.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Empire State Building, Megaprojects, Project management, Empire State Realty Trust
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142420 (URN)10.1016/j.bushor.2017.09.004 (DOI)000423637100006 ()
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Burström, T. & Wilson, T. (2018). The texture of tension: complexity, uncertainty and equivocality. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 11(2), 458-485
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The texture of tension: complexity, uncertainty and equivocality
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 458-485Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The premise of this paper is that tension exists among participants and parties engaged in projects. The uniqueness of development virtually assures this. The purpose of this paper is to propose that tension is a product of the precursors of complexity, uncertainty and equivocality, and an attempt is made to characterize tension as it arises in projects - its genesis and its nature. 

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth case study was conducted in a manner in which the contextually sensitive empirical researches for which Nordic studies are known. Within discussions on the strategy, decision making, intra-and inter-project interdependencies and managing across development sites associated with a flagship project, 77 statements concerning tension were identified for analysis. Through a literature review, 12 tension-driving factors were identified. These factors were used as base for analysis. 

Findings

These statements were analyzed for content to produce a model associating tension with its precursors and the literature on tension. It is found that due to innovation turbulence, tension-driving factors are cascaded in and around organization(s). Tension is manifested in various ways for different stakeholders and tension management is performed through cognitive and emotional responses. The texture of tension is characterized by fluidity, multiplicity and parallelism. 

Research limitations/implications

Case studies can of course not be generalized; they are valuable, however, in indicating important observations for further studies. 

Practical implications

A contribution is made to management theory where knowledge about project context is seen as essential in order to understand best practices for project execution and effectiveness. 

Originality/value

Although common, even virtually assured in projects, tension tends to be neglected in successful management. This study associates the genesis of tension through the underlying contributions of complexity, uncertainty and equivocality. It is believed to be the first study of its type.

Keywords
Tension, complexity, uncertainty, equivocality, projects
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142419 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-01-2017-0005 (DOI)000441077500011 ()2-s2.0-85045186445 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Wilson, T. (2018). Tinkerbell and the Empire State Building: Recalling what seems to be forgotten. PM World Journal, VII(VII), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tinkerbell and the Empire State Building: Recalling what seems to be forgotten
2018 (English)In: PM World Journal, ISSN 2330-4480, Vol. VII, no VII, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

“I do believe in fairies! I do! I do!!” (Peter Pan)

In the 1905 play “Peter Pan; or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up”, Sir James Matthew Barrie described how Peter Pan, through his strong beliefs, brought the fairy Tinkerbell back to life. In this short essay, we aim to initiate discussions on the role of strong beliefs and the so-called “Tinkerbell effect” in upholding taken-for-granted assumptions within the construction industry.

As the basis for the discussion, the essay reports on a recently published journal article in Business Horizons entitled “Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: Have we forgotten something?” (Jacobsson and Wilson, 2018). Presently the article is also sold as a case study and teaching case by Harvard Business Review. (The case study can be accessed at https://tinyurl.com/HBRcasestudy and the teaching case at https://tinyurl.com/HBPEcase)

Keywords
Projects, Empire State Building, Construction, Project Management, Mega projects
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150124 (URN)
Available from: 2018-07-09 Created: 2018-07-09 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Wilson, T. & Lindbergh, L. (2017). A Fifth Look at Swedish Public Housing: Operating under Business-Like Principles: Walking the Walk. In: Pennsylvania Economic Association Annual ConferenceProceedings, 2017: . Paper presented at Pennsylvania Economic Association 2017 Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Fifth Look at Swedish Public Housing: Operating under Business-Like Principles: Walking the Walk
2017 (English)In: Pennsylvania Economic Association Annual ConferenceProceedings, 2017, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain if financial observations parallel the text findings in owner directives that suggested Municipal Housing Companies (MHCs) in Sweden have complied with the Public Municipal Housing Companies Act of 2011 (PMHCA 2011) requiring them to act in a business-like manner.  Results are reported here for 19 of the original 20 companies used in a sample suggesting MPHs were acting in a business-like manner as required by PMHCA 2011.  Information for the study was obtained from the Retriever Business database, which included complete company financials for the period.  Best straight lines were constructed through individual company data from 2005 to 2010 (pre-regulation) and 2010 to 2014 (post-regulation).  A t-test of slope difference was used to indicate the significance of any change.  Sample results suggest that the industry as a whole has adjusted overall to the business-like mandate insofar as revenue generation illustrates an upturn starting in 2011.  Results for return on assets, operating profit margin and solvency did not show statistically significant results.  Results for two individual firms illustrate how extreme reactions might occur.

Keywords
Municipal Public Housing, Sweden, Companies Act of 2011, Business-Like
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138663 (URN)
Conference
Pennsylvania Economic Association 2017 Conference
Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Wilson, T. & Lindbergh, L. (2017). An Initial Look at a Basic Swedish Finance Course. In: Sigmond, N., Myers, C., Belloit, J. and Gallagher, M. (Ed.), Northeastern Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference Proceedings: . Paper presented at Northeastern Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Initial Look at a Basic Swedish Finance Course
2017 (English)In: Northeastern Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference Proceedings / [ed] Sigmond, N., Myers, C., Belloit, J. and Gallagher, M., 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The course that is described and discussed herein is a B level (2nd year) finance course at Umeå University in Umeå, Sweden – Financial Analysis and Valuation (Räkenskapsanalys och Värdering).  The course is designed to develop students' ability to comprehend business information and to use different methods and tools of financial analysis and valuation, especially in connection with business valuation.  Existing corporate information is used in teaching, and emphasis is placed on the interpretation of observation. Analyses are motivated by the need for ongoing evaluations of companies in financial terms. Various problems are highlighted and discussed; measures such as how business valuation can affect various stakeholders and potential implications are related to ethics and sustainability.  A group term paper (PM) is required in the course.  The analysis within the term paper, although primarily financial, also has a social and organizational perspective, which affects the choice of the appropriate method of approach.

Keywords
Finance, education
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138842 (URN)
Conference
Northeastern Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference
Available from: 2017-09-02 Created: 2017-09-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Wilson, T. & Lindbergh, L. (2017). An initial look at a basic Swedish finance course. In: Sigmond, N., Belloit, J. and Myers, C. (Ed.), Northeastern Association of Business, Economicsand Technology Conference Proceedings: . Paper presented at Northeastern Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference (NABET) (pp. 292-303).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An initial look at a basic Swedish finance course
2017 (English)In: Northeastern Association of Business, Economicsand Technology Conference Proceedings / [ed] Sigmond, N., Belloit, J. and Myers, C., 2017, p. 292-303Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The course that is described and discussed is a B level finance course - Räkenskapsanalys och värdering (Financial Analysis and Valuation).  The course is designed to develop students' ability to view business information, and to use different methods and tools of financial analysis and valuation, especially in connection with business valuation.  Business coverage is used in teaching, and emphasis is placed on the interpretation of results. Various problems are highlighted and discussed; measures such as how business valuation can affect various stakeholders and potential implications are related to ethics and sustainability. Analysis is based on a social and organizational perspective, which also affects the choice of the appropriate method of approach. The analysis is motivated by the need for ongoing evaluation of the company in financial terms. During the course, spreadsheet programs such as “analysis” and “decision support” are used.  Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is a tool for managing the business and enables faster, more informed decisions.

This course is offered about half-way through the undergraduate civilekonom management curriculum and it is carried out within the typical Swedish module of five weeks of conduct and is taught in Swedish.  It normally plays to approximately 80 students in the spring (and to 40 other students in the Autumn).  The students work independently and in groups of four. For the group assignment, students choose to work with one colleague and the pairs are then randomly coupled with another pair. The module is designed to develop students’ ability to absorb accounting information and to use different methods of financial analysis and assessment, especially in connection with business valuation.  Text books are currently used are Berk and DeMarzo (2014), Nilsson et al. (2002) and Hansson et al. (2006). The  latter two are currently being reviewed and will probably be exchanged or complemented with Palepu et al. (2016) and Berk et al. (2017) or corresponding in 2018. 

Course definitions are formally addressed in a Department’s permission to offer document.  An important part of this document is an expectations of learning section.  That section for this course is “after completed, students should be able to:

  • review a company's accounting information and use measuring techniques to assess the company's profitability, solvency, efficiency, return and risk level,
  • conduct a strategic analysis of the company's business environment,
  • apply different methods of business valuation,
  • analyze the pros and cons of a valuation method,
  • relate environmental aspects to the company's risk and return, and
  • demonstrate an understanding of how business can be used as a basis and monitor activities”

This learning is supported by lectures and tutorials, exercises, cases with seminars and labs associated with business activity monitoring. Students independently collect, process and analyze companies on the basis of annual report data and other available information.

Keywords
Financial course, Sweden, Learning Objectives, Evaluation
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145984 (URN)
Conference
Northeastern Association of Business, Economics and Technology Conference (NABET)
Available from: 2018-03-24 Created: 2018-03-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Långström, S., Lindbergh, L. & Wilson, T. (2017). Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) disclosure in Annual Reports of Public Municipal Housing Companies in Sweden. In: NFF Conference Proceedings: Bodö, 23-25 August 2017.: . Paper presented at NFF Conference: Bodö, 23-25 August 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) disclosure in Annual Reports of Public Municipal Housing Companies in Sweden
2017 (English)In: NFF Conference Proceedings: Bodö, 23-25 August 2017., 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the degree to which, and with what apparent intent, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is disclosed in Swedish Public Municipal Housing companies’ (PMHC) annual reports.

 

Method: Although exploratory, the research uses a statistical approach to quantitatively assess four research questions developed to guide the research from a random sample of 50 firms from an industry population of 263 companies.  The development depends upon a content analysis with qualitative assessment of the annual reports and utilizes NVivo software to analyze information. The framework for the content analysis is based on Clarkson et al. (2008) environmental index and Sutantoputra (2009) social index. In turn, they are based on the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI).

 

Findings: This study brings new information about CSR disclosure in the annual reports for PMHCs. Results suggest that PMHCs tend universally to include CSR material in their annual reports.  Based on a random sample of 50 PMHC all had some citations, seven being the minimum.  Further, there was a relationship between environmental and social citations.

 

Research limitations/implications: The study is based on annual reports from 2014 and only limited companies were included in the study. Nevertheless, every annual report that was reviewed contained CSR information, which shows that it is important to organizations.  Future studies could be done on another type of housing, for example privately owned rental properties. Another suggestion is to do a follow up study on this population to see if CSR reporting has increased. The framework could also be used to review CSR on another official document, for example the business plan.

 

Practical implications:  The study puts a spotlight on CSR in annual reports, both for PMHCs but also for other industries. This could lead to more CSR being integrated into annual reports in the future.

 

Originality/value: This is the first attempt to report on the status of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Swedish Municipal Public Housing, which tends to be of interest in the global housing sector. Participants in public housing, as either managers, residents or academics should value these results. This study is also relevant for those studying or working with CSR since it is an industry specific study that has not been performed before.

Keywords
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Public Municipal Housing Company (PMHC), Sustainability, Annual Reports, Sweden, Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), Content analysis, Environmental, Social
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138668 (URN)
Conference
NFF Conference: Bodö, 23-25 August 2017.
Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Lindberg, E., Bohman, H., Hulten, P. & Wilson, T. (2017). Enhancing students' entrepreneurial mindset: a Swedish experience. Education + Training, 59(7-8), 768-779
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing students' entrepreneurial mindset: a Swedish experience
2017 (English)In: Education + Training, ISSN 0040-0912, E-ISSN 1758-6127, Vol. 59, no 7-8, p. 768-779Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on the test of a pedagogical intervention to enhance students' entrepreneurial mindset on a university course.

Design/methodology/approach – The course where the authors tested the new course design is a mandatory one in the business school’s undergraduate business program. Pre- and post-evaluations of the students’ opportunity recognition (OR) and individual entrepreneurial orientation (IEO) were carried out to measure the effects of an intervention aimed at enhancing these capabilities.

Findings – The results from paired-samples t-tests indicate significant positive changes (enhancements) of the students’ OR and IEO. The positive effects of the intervention methods are accounted for as evidence of the benefits of applying pedagogical methods that fit the learning style of young adults.

Practical implications – The findings suggest that students’ mindsets can be positively affected by an intervention tailored to enhance their OR and IEO capabilities. The findings have implications for curriculum development because the strengthening of these capabilities is a precondition for further development of the participants’ innovative and creative thinking, as well as their entrepreneurial orientation.  Since innovative and entrepreneurial activities have a positive impact on economies worldwide, the authors encourage the adaption of the intervention methods applied in this study in other settings.

Originality/value – This paper reports the results of a pedagogical intervention aimed at enhancing students’ entrepreneurial mindset. The findings from the study demonstrate that the applied intervention method supports the development of functional skills, which complement the conceptual knowledge gained from other courses in the undergraduate program.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Keywords
Self-directed learning, Curriculum development, Entrepreneurial mindset, Business opportunity
National Category
Learning Pedagogy
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138653 (URN)10.1108/ET-09-2016-0140 (DOI)000406795200009 ()
Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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