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Eliasson, Inger
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Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
Eliasson, I. (2019). Emotional abuse in children’s sport – coaches and children’s perspectives. In: In proceedings of 16th EASS Conference, Bø, 2019, Norway: . Paper presented at EASS Conference, Bø, Norway, June 3-6, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional abuse in children’s sport – coaches and children’s perspectives
2019 (English)In: In proceedings of 16th EASS Conference, Bø, 2019, Norway, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Child protection has risen rapidly at the Swedish sport policy agenda in recent years as in other European countries. However, despite the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child it has been shown that children are not protected enough from being abused in sport. There is a lack of research on emotionally harmful behaviours in children’s sport, though more prevalent compared to other forms of abuse for example sexual abuse. The aim was to study the existence, experiences and effects of emotional abuse among 13-18 years old Swedish athletes and coaches. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews with 21 participants, 15 children and 5 coaches. The results show that emotional abuse occurs both between athletes, and between coaches and athletes. The most commonly forms of emotional abuse were verbal abuse, non-verbal abuse, neglect and lack of attention. However, the abuse reported were often were linked to children’s sport performance.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160455 (URN)
Conference
EASS Conference, Bø, Norway, June 3-6, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-19
Eliasson, I. & Lindkvist, L. (2018). Barns upplevelser av emotionella övergrepp inom idrott. Idrottsforskning.se
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barns upplevelser av emotionella övergrepp inom idrott
2018 (Swedish)In: Idrottsforskning.seArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning, 2018
Keywords
attityd, barn och ungdomar, barn- och ungdomsidrott, barns rättigheter, fn:s barnkonvention, organisationskultur, tränare
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153220 (URN)
Note

Publicerad: 2018-10-16

Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, I. (2018). Child-rearing in public spaces: the challenging dual-role relationships of parent–coaches and child–athletes of coaches in Swedish team sports. Sport, Education and Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Child-rearing in public spaces: the challenging dual-role relationships of parent–coaches and child–athletes of coaches in Swedish team sports
2018 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to examine the challenges of being either a parent–coach or a child–athlete of a coach within the context of Swedish youth sport. Conceptually, the paper draws on educational and sociological theories regarding changing perspectives in child-rearing. The results are based on data gathered from interviews with parent–coaches and child–athletes (ages 13–15) of coaches involved in team sports. The results indicate that a range of meanings emerged through these unique sets of interactions, resulting in both positive and negative experiences for both children and their parents. To manage the perceived challenges, four behavioural strategies were used including: fairness, distancing, defence, and quitting. Overall, this study provides a deeper understanding of the challenges of these unique dual roles in relation to contemporary child-rearing perspectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
parenting, parents, coaches, phenomenology, sport pedagogy
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152038 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2018.1528219 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, I. (2018). Hur är det egentligen att vara föräldratränare och tränarbarn?: . In: Centrum för idrottsforskning (Ed.), Centrum för idrottsforskning 30 års-jubileumskonferens: Idrottsforskning 2018 – för en hållbar barn- och elitidrott. Stockholm, 15-16 oktober 2018. Paper presented at Centrum för idrottsforskning 30 års-jubileumskonferens, Idrottsforskning 2018 – för en hållbar barn- och elitidrott. Stockholm, 15-16 oktober 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hur är det egentligen att vara föräldratränare och tränarbarn?:
2018 (Swedish)In: Centrum för idrottsforskning 30 års-jubileumskonferens: Idrottsforskning 2018 – för en hållbar barn- och elitidrott. Stockholm, 15-16 oktober 2018 / [ed] Centrum för idrottsforskning, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160456 (URN)
Conference
Centrum för idrottsforskning 30 års-jubileumskonferens, Idrottsforskning 2018 – för en hållbar barn- och elitidrott. Stockholm, 15-16 oktober 2018
Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, I. (2017). Adapting sports to children - from vision to practice. In: Irena Slepičková (Ed.), Book of Abstract EASS 2017: The Values of Sport: between tradition and (post) modernity. Paper presented at 14th European Sport Sociology Congress. 14-17 June 2017, Prague, Czech Republic (pp. 74-74). Prague, Czech Republic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adapting sports to children - from vision to practice
2017 (English)In: Book of Abstract EASS 2017: The Values of Sport: between tradition and (post) modernity / [ed] Irena Slepičková, Prague, Czech Republic, 2017, p. 74-74Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The scientific knowledge about how sport are adapted to the child’s preferences, needs and circumstances in different sports is flawed. It also means that the knowledge of the effects of alternative models for children’s sport are largely missing. The purpose of this study was to analyse how sport organizations within the Swedish sport system works to adapt sports and sport-practices to suite children better – and how the goals based on the visons of sport federations were implemented in the practice of children’s sport in sport clubs. Further, the aim was to investigate how coaches and children in sport clubs experienced the adaptions of sports initiated by sport federations. The research was inspired by a system theoretical approach and conducted within a qualitative framework. The empirical data was derived from semi-structured interviews with 31 people from the sports basketball, floorball and track-and-field. The sample consists of seven sport federation representatives (national and regional level), 12 sport-club coaches and 12 children between 10 and 13 years. The results indicated that the examined sport activities were experienced to be relatively well adapted to the children, however there are still much that needs to be changed. Furthermore, the results showed that national sports federations applied different strategies for implementation of the adaptions of the sport and sport-practices to children at the sports club level. The different strategies were; the governing strategy (basketball), the testing strategy (floorball) and the education strategy (track and field). Overall, this study contributes to a deeper understanding of possibilities and difficulties for sport organizers to develop children’s sport in accordance with a child perspective and of the meaning of cooperation within the Swedish sport system to implement visions and policies at club level. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Prague, Czech Republic: , 2017
Keywords
Swedish sport-system, children’s sport, child-perspective, club-sport
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139747 (URN)978-80-87647-36-3 (ISBN)
Conference
14th European Sport Sociology Congress. 14-17 June 2017, Prague, Czech Republic
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Eliasson, I. & Johansson, A. (2017). Att sluta med idrott: En analys av avslutsprocessen och varför flickor slutar spela innebandy. Umeå: Pedagogiska institutionen
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att sluta med idrott: En analys av avslutsprocessen och varför flickor slutar spela innebandy
2017 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Many girls and boys quit sport in their teens. The reasons for this has eluded scientists and sports organizations for many years. This study was performed on behalf of the Swedish Floorball Association with the aim to understand why girls quit floorball during their teenage years and to increase knowledge about what sportclubs can do to prevent girls from quitting. Special focus was directed towards the disengagement process which the girls undergoes when they take the decision to quit their sport participation. The study is based on data from 24 semi-structured interviews with 12 girls aged 13-18 years (n=12) and with one parent from each of the girls (n=12). The results showed that the disengagement process can take from a few months up to two years before the girl takes the final decision. A combination of different factors was found as the most common main reason to quit, and six salient factors were identified as crucial for the decision. The observed critical factors was; an increased focus on sport performance and results, changes in the team's formation, new coaches and changes in the coach's attitudes, interest in any other activity or sport, lack of time and high demands on themselves. Often a girl had quit due to a combination of three to four of these factors. The results indicated that the critical factors connected to the girls' decision often was related to changes from the way it was earlier in younger years. Furthermore, the results showed that parents were involved in the girls’ disengagement process, while representatives from the sport clubs were almost absent. Therefore, the representatives of sportclubs have limited knowledge about who the girls are and why they are thinking about quitting the sport. This means representatives are less able to adopt accurate strategies or to implement appropriate interventions to reduce the drop-out rate. One message to the sport organisations is therefore to develop strategies for dealing with the members’ thoughts and feelings about their sport participation and be especially aware of how changes in sport, in a combination with other critical factors, may affect the athletes´.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Pedagogiska institutionen, 2017. p. 88
Series
Pedagogiska rapporter från Pedagogiska institutionen, ISSN 1403-6169 ; 91
Keywords
Disengagement process, drop-out, organized sports, team sport, floor ball
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-93448 (URN)978-91-7601-099-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-09-22 Created: 2014-09-22 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, I., Karp, S. & Wickman, K. (2017). Developing sports with a children’s rights perspective?: Intentions, methods, and priorities of development projects in local Swedish sports clubs. European Journal for Sport and Society, 14(3), 244-264
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing sports with a children’s rights perspective?: Intentions, methods, and priorities of development projects in local Swedish sports clubs
2017 (English)In: European Journal for Sport and Society, ISSN 1613-8171, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 244-264Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to analyze the planned development of sport practice regarding children’s rights through project applications from Swedish sports clubs within the Lift for Sport programme. The study on which this paper reports uses data from a large-scale research project that evaluated this sport-for-all programme and is based on an analysis of 2563 applications within five different national sports organizations. Theoretically, the evaluation study draws on programme theories and analyses financially funded development applications made by the sports clubs. The proportion of applications concerning aspects of children’s rights was 2.4% within the following categories: children’s safety in sports, young people’s views, ethics of children’s sports, and prevention of exclusion and dropout from sport. Those applications were further examined regarding which intentions, methods, and priorities sports clubs were aiming to develop children’s sport to be in line with a children’s rights perspective. The methods used to reach the goals were sometimes the same regardless of intention, and, despite the good intentions and some creative methods used for development, applicants seemed to be uncertain about and searching for which relevant methods to use. The findings can be used to inform the discussion on the design of development programmes, policies, and practices to change children’s sport in the framework of children’s rights.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
children’s rights, development, human rights, sport policy, UNCRC
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138933 (URN)10.1080/16138171.2017.1349056 (DOI)000442108400005 ()
Available from: 2017-09-04 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Fahlén, J., Wickman, K. & Eliasson, I. (2017). Resisting self-regulation: an analysis of sport policy programme making and implementation in Sweden. In: Michael Sam & Steven J. Jackson (Ed.), Sport policy in small states: . Oxford: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resisting self-regulation: an analysis of sport policy programme making and implementation in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Sport policy in small states / [ed] Michael Sam & Steven J. Jackson, Oxford: Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Routledge, 2017
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132949 (URN)9781138938885 (ISBN)
Note

Previously published as article in a special issue of the International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics:

Fahlén, J., Eliasson, I., & Wickman, K. (2015) Resisting self-regulation: An analysis of sport policy programme making and implementation in Sweden. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, 7(3), 391-406. DOI: 10.1080/19406940.2014.925954

Available from: 2017-03-25 Created: 2017-03-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, I. (2017). The gap between formalised children's rights and children's real lives in sport. International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 52(4), 470-496
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The gap between formalised children's rights and children's real lives in sport
2017 (English)In: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, ISSN 1012-6902, E-ISSN 1461-7218, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 470-496Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to use the theoretical standpoint of sociology of childhood to enhance understanding about how children's rights, as outlined by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, are experienced by child athletes and adult coaches in the context of sport clubs in Sweden. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews with children and coaches in floorball and equestrian sports during the years 2011 and 2012. The results showed that neither child athletes nor adult coaches were aware that the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child has been incorporated into Swedish sport policy; they also lack knowledge of the convention's content. After interviews about selected rights were conducted, it was evident that children and adults both considered the themes of those rights to be of utmost importance. However, they did not find the convention meaningful as a policy document, and no systematic, deliberate or preventive work with regard to the rights of the child was experienced in the sport clubs. This paper discusses some challenges in the children's sport context, including children's rights, the social ordering of children and adults and the goal of making children's sport a safe activity for children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Childhood, child sport, human rights, United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, policy implementation
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109897 (URN)10.1177/1012690215608516 (DOI)000401363200005 ()
Available from: 2015-10-08 Created: 2015-10-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, I. (2016). An analysis of the dual role of being a "parental-coach" and a "coach-child" in child and youth sport. In: Adam B. Evans, Glen Nielsen, Lone Friis Thing and Laila Ottesen (Ed.), Sport in the City – Mobility, Urbanity and Social Change: 13th European Association for Sociology of Sport Conference: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at 13th European Association for Sociology of Sport Conference, Copenhagen, May 4-7, 2016 (pp. 69-70). Copenhagen: University of Copenhagen, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sport
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An analysis of the dual role of being a "parental-coach" and a "coach-child" in child and youth sport
2016 (English)In: Sport in the City – Mobility, Urbanity and Social Change: 13th European Association for Sociology of Sport Conference: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Adam B. Evans, Glen Nielsen, Lone Friis Thing and Laila Ottesen, Copenhagen: University of Copenhagen, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sport , 2016, p. 69-70Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Due to the large number of coaches coaching their own child in Swedish sport clubs, there is a need for studies about the dual role of being a coach and a parent to a child in a sport group. The aim of this study was to investigate the phenomenon of being a "parental coach" and a "coach child" in sport in the light of current childrearing discourses. By answering questions regarding what it means for the child athlete to have its father or mother as a team sport coach, and what it means for the parent to coach their own child this study starts to fill the research gap in this area. The method used was semi-structured interviews with seven “parental coaches” and six “coach children” aged 13-15 years old. A phenomenological analysis shows that there are both significant advantages and disadvantages with the dual roles of being a “parental coach” and a “coach child” in sport. The most salient advantages are the parents’ possibilities to influence their own child’s behaviour in the sport context as well as their athletic development and that the dual roles also provides opportunities for the parent and the child to spend time together and socialize. On the other hand, the disadvantages showed to be about the child’s difficulties to deal with critique from their parent and that the “parental coach” sometimes have higher demands on their own child’s behavior and sport performance compared to the other children. However, the results also shows that a “coach child” more easily is defying their “parental coach” than other coaches. Overall the study indicated this social relation requires children and parents to develop strategies to deal with the situation. One strategy used is to switch between the roles as coach/parent and athlete/child, in sport situations and at home. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: University of Copenhagen, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sport, 2016
Keywords
Parental-coach, coach-child, childrearing, organized sports, team sport
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125371 (URN)
Conference
13th European Association for Sociology of Sport Conference, Copenhagen, May 4-7, 2016
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2018-08-10Bibliographically approved
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