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Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, HannaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7257-0956
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Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Winberg, K., Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, H. & Rosenberg, D. (2019). Inclusive spaces in post-secondary education: exploring the experience of educational supports for people with a neuropsychiatric disability. International Journal of Inclusive Education (12), 1263-1276
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusive spaces in post-secondary education: exploring the experience of educational supports for people with a neuropsychiatric disability
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173, no 12, p. 1263-1276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the experiences of studying among people with a neuropsychiatric disability who received support from a Supported Education (SEd) programme, and people who did not receive this support. The research employed a narrative approach, where 14 participants with a neuropsychiatric diagnosis were asked to write a short reflective narrative about their experience of studying, with/without support from a SEd intervention. The results show that the persons without support from the model relied on their family as their primary support, and that support from formal support providers was not available prior to receiving a formal diagnosis. Those who received services from SEd were generally satisfied with the support they received, and did not emphasise the family as support givers in the same way. The study points to the importance of developing neurodiverse spaces, which can serve as transitional environments and that can help supported education models adapt to the needs of this group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Supported Education, higher education, support, autism, ADHD, neuropsychiatric disability
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145520 (URN)10.1080/13603116.2018.1445303 (DOI)000490406000004 ()
Available from: 2018-03-08 Created: 2018-03-08 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, H. (2019). Knowing what to do: exploring meanings of development and peer support aimed at people with autism. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 23(2), 174-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowing what to do: exploring meanings of development and peer support aimed at people with autism
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 174-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Non-autistic people is frequently described as best positioned to provide support to autistic people. But what could autistic peer support, where the support actor is another person with autism, mean? The aim of this paper is to explore different meanings of development and peer support at an autistic-only work place in Sweden. The analyses in this paper is based on data from a field work among a group of autistic self-advocates in Sweden. The group is working together in a three-year autist led project aiming at supporting young adults with autism with life strategies and with peer-to-peer mentoring as well as educating employers about autistic abilities. In the group ideas of an alternative autistic development to be nurtured and supported by autistic peer support is brought forward. Support to autistic people has to be based on understandings on autistic functionality and ways of developing and learning. This includes support in executive function, formulating goals and future aspirations, support in to get to know your abilities, embrace and cherish your strengths and interests, and get to know your difficulties including strategies to manage them, without reinforcing a sense of failure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
autism, peer support, autistic peer support, empowerment, Sweden, self-advocacy
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Sociology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144504 (URN)10.1080/13603116.2018.1427807 (DOI)000454933100004 ()
Available from: 2018-02-05 Created: 2018-02-05 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Nouf-Latif, F., Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, H. & Markström, U. (2019). Narratives of ideal and second-option jobs among young adults with high functioning autism. Nordic Social Work Research, 9(2), 104-117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narratives of ideal and second-option jobs among young adults with high functioning autism
2019 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 104-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The meaning of work is different for people in different social groups, and research exploring perceptions of meaningful work among adults with high-functioning autism (HFA) is scarce. The aim of this paper is to explore how narratives of satisfactory and meaningful future jobs are portrayed relative to two alternative discourses of work – the 'obligation to work' discourse, and the 'disability rights' discourse. This group of individuals are high functioning on the one hand, while at the same time holding legally-mandated special disability rights, an exploration of how this group reason about work-life and satisfactory jobs is particularly interesting. Through ethnographic fieldwork in Sweden, seven young adults with HFA were followed, and 17 interviews were conducted. The main findings and conclusions are that jobs that are individually assessed to be ‘ideal’, are put aside in favor of jobs that are more compatible with general labor market demands, as long as enjoyment and meaningfulness can still be experienced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Citizen-worker, high functioning autism, meaningful work, vocational support, work-life
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150586 (URN)10.1080/2156857X.2018.1484385 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-1111
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, H. & Brownlow, C. (2018). Becoming a popular girl: exploring constructions of friendships in teen magazines (1ed.). In: Lindsay O'Dell, Charlotte Brownlow and Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist (Ed.), Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories (pp. 41-54). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Becoming a popular girl: exploring constructions of friendships in teen magazines
2018 (English)In: Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories / [ed] Lindsay O'Dell, Charlotte Brownlow and Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 41-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144734 (URN)9781138654044 (ISBN)9781138654037 (ISBN)9781315623467 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, H. & Arnell, L. (2018). Being a Responsible Violent Girl?: Exploring Female Violence, Self-management, and ADHD. Girlhood Studies, 11(2), 111-126
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a Responsible Violent Girl?: Exploring Female Violence, Self-management, and ADHD
2018 (English)In: Girlhood Studies, ISSN 1938-8209, E-ISSN 1938-8322, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 111-126Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we explore how young women in Sweden negotiate their gendered subject positions in relation to psychiatric diagnoses, particularly Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and the meanings of their own violent acts. The data consists of transcripts of face-to-face interviews with young women who have experienced using aggressive and violent acts. Given that the analysis is informed by ideas developed in discursive psychology, we identified the centrality of the concepts of responsibility and self-management. In this study responsibility is connected to gendered notions of passivity and activity. What we call the ordinary girl is neither too active nor too passive, and the extraordinary girl is either too active or too passive in the managing of herself. Similar to those of a troublesome past, the narratives of ADHD enable the understanding of an intelligible violent self, and therefore make female externalized violence what we describe as narrative-able.

Keywords
aggression, discursive psychology, emotional regulation, gendered subjectivities, psychiatric diagnoses, Sweden
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
gender studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159043 (URN)10.3167/ghs.2018.110209 (DOI)000438990700009 ()
Available from: 2019-05-17 Created: 2019-05-17 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Silfver, E., Maritha, J., Arnell, L., Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, H., Härgestam, M., Sjöberg, M. & Widding, U. (2018). Classroom bodies: affect, body language, and discourse when schoolchildren encounter national tests in mathematics. Gender and Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classroom bodies: affect, body language, and discourse when schoolchildren encounter national tests in mathematics
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to analyse how Swedish grade three children are discursively positioned as pupils when they are taking national tests in mathematics and when they reflect on the testing situation afterwards. With support from theories about affective-discursive assemblages, we explore children's body language, emotions, and talk in light of the two overarching discourses that we believe frame the classroom: the 'testing discourse' and the 'development discourse'. Through the disciplinary power of these main discourses children struggle to conduct themselves in order to become recognized as intelligible subjects and 'ideal pupils'. The analysis, when taking into account how affects and discourses intertwine, shows that children can be in 'untroubled', 'troubled', or ambivalent subject positions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
affective-discursive assemblages, grade three children, ‘ideal’ pupils, mathematics tests, power
National Category
Pedagogy Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147753 (URN)10.1080/09540253.2018.1473557 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2019-07-08
O'Dell, L., Brownlow, C. & Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, H. (2018). Conclusion: theorising transgressive developmental trajectories and understanding children seen as 'different' (1ed.). In: Lindsay O'Dell, Charlotte Brownlow and Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist (Ed.), Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories (pp. 146-156). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conclusion: theorising transgressive developmental trajectories and understanding children seen as 'different'
2018 (English)In: Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories / [ed] Lindsay O'Dell, Charlotte Brownlow and Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 146-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144736 (URN)9781138654044 (ISBN)9781138654037 (ISBN)9781315623467 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
O'Dell, L., Brownlow, C. & Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, H. (2018). Different adulthoods: Normative development and transgressive trajectories. Feminism and Psychology, 28(3), 349-354
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different adulthoods: Normative development and transgressive trajectories
2018 (English)In: Feminism and Psychology, ISSN 0959-3535, E-ISSN 1461-7161, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 349-354Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2018
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151055 (URN)10.1177/0959353518786522 (DOI)000441281700003 ()
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
O'Dell, L., Brownlow, C. & Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, H. (Eds.). (2018). Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories (1ed.). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Different Childhoods: Non/Normative Development and Transgressive Trajectories opens up new avenues for exploring children's development as contextual, provisional and locally produced, rather than a unitary, universal and consistent process.

This edited collection frames a critical exploration of the trajectory against which children are seen to be 'different' within three key themes: deconstructing 'developmental tasks', locating development and the limits of childhood. Examining the particular kinds of 'transgressive' development, contributors discuss instances of 'difference' including migration, work, assumptions of vulnerability, trans childhoods, friendships and involvement in crime. Including both empirical and theoretical discussions, the book builds on existing debates as part of the interrogation of 'different childhoods'.

This book provides essential reading for students wishing to explore notions of development while also being of interest to both academics and practitioners working across a broad area of disciplines such as developmental psychology, sociology, childhood studies and critical criminology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018. p. 160 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141004 (URN)9781138654044 (ISBN)9781138654037 (ISBN)9781315623467 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, H., Katsui, H. & McLaughlin, J. (2018). Editorial Review: Touring the Archive 1999-2017 and Mapping the Future of Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research. Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, 20(1), 1-5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial Review: Touring the Archive 1999-2017 and Mapping the Future of Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research is now an Open Access Journal from this issue onwards. We are particularly pleased that not only new articles, but also our full archive are included in the publishing agreement with Stockholm University Press. To celebrate this turning point in the Journal's history, we have revisited trends in its development, considered what recent and newly published articles say about its direction, and have explored what we see as important possibilities for our future. This editorial is our reflections on what we have found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm University Press, 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-149038 (URN)10.16993/sjdr.540 (DOI)000433656600001 ()2-s2.0-85047909981 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Projects
Worklife and adults with autism ? a study of representations of autism and worklife among adults with autism, employers and in media [2012-01111_Forte]; Umeå UniversityNetwork: Researching neuropsychiatric disabilities within humanities and social sciences [2013-01852_Forte]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7257-0956

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