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Liu, H., Yu, F., Shao, W., Ding, D., Yu, Z., Chen, F., . . . Guo, X. (2018). Associations between selenium content in hair and Kashin-Beck Disease/Keshan Disease in children in Northwestern China: a prospective cohort study. Biological Trace Element Research, 184(1), 16-23, Article ID 28983831.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between selenium content in hair and Kashin-Beck Disease/Keshan Disease in children in Northwestern China: a prospective cohort study
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2018 (English)In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 184, no 1, p. 16-23, article id 28983831Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between selenium content in hair and the incidence of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) and Keshan disease (KD) in China. A prospective cohort study was conducted among children aged 5-12 years with different levels of low-selenium (group 1, Se ≤ 110 ng/g; group 2, 110 < Se ≤ 150 ng/g; and group 3, 150 < Se ≤ 200 ng/g) or selenium-supplemented (group 4, Se > 200 ng/g) exposure. A person-years approach was used to calculate the incidence and rate of positive clinical signs. Relative risk (RR), attributable risk, and etiologic fraction were used to determine the strength of association between selenium and disease incidence. Seven new KBD cases were diagnosed during 3-year follow-up. Positive clinical signs of KBD were found in 17.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.27-21.29) cases per 100 person-years in group 1, 13.28 (9.82-16.74) in group 2, 12.95 (9.34-16.56) in group 3, and 8.18 (5.50-10.85) in group 4. Compared with group 4, the RR (95% CI) of groups 1, 2, and 3 were 2.17 (1.48-3.19), 1.62 (1.07-2.47), and 1.58 (1.03-2.43), respectively. Positive clinical signs of KD were 25.90 (18.62-33.18) cases per 100 person-years in group 1, 5.66 (1.26-10.06) in group 2, 4.60 (0.20-9.00) in group 3, and 14.62 (8.54-20.69) in group 4. Compared with group 4, the RR (95% CI) were 1.77 (1.07-2.93), 0.39 (0.16-0.93), and 0.31 (0.11-0.89), respectively. In children, the onset of KBD was negatively correlated with selenium content within a certain range. However, there may be a U-shaped association between selenium content and KD in children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Cohort study, Kashin-Beck disease, Keshan disease, Selenium
National Category
Pediatrics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140367 (URN)10.1007/s12011-017-1169-x (DOI)000434723900003 ()28983831 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-08 Created: 2017-10-08 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Lammi, M., Piltti, J., Prittinen, J. & Qu, C. (2018). Challenges in fabricaaion of tissue-engineered cartilage with correct cellular colonization and extracellular matrix Assembly. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(9), Article ID 2700.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in fabricaaion of tissue-engineered cartilage with correct cellular colonization and extracellular matrix Assembly
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 19, no 9, article id 2700Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A correct articular cartilage ultrastructure regarding its structural components and cellularity is important for appropriate performance of tissue-engineered articular cartilage. Various scaffold-based, as well as scaffold-free, culture models have been under development to manufacture functional cartilage tissue. Even decellularized tissues have been considered as a potential choice for cellular seeding and tissue fabrication. Pore size, interconnectivity, and functionalization of the scaffold architecture can be varied. Increased mechanical function requires a dense scaffold, which also easily restricts cellular access within the scaffold at seeding. High pore size enhances nutrient transport, while small pore size improves cellular interactions and scaffold resorption. In scaffold-free cultures, the cells assemble the tissue completely by themselves; in optimized cultures, they should be able to fabricate native-like tissue. Decellularized cartilage has a native ultrastructure, although it is a challenge to obtain proper cellular colonization during cell seeding. Bioprinting can, in principle, provide the tissue with correct cellularity and extracellular matrix content, although it is still an open question as to how the correct molecular interaction and structure of extracellular matrix could be achieved. These are challenges facing the ongoing efforts to manufacture optimal articular cartilage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
articular cartilage, cartilage architecture, cell colonization, extracellular matrix, tissue engineering
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Orthopaedics Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Cell Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry; cellforskning; Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151888 (URN)10.3390/ijms19092700 (DOI)30208585 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053359968 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-16 Created: 2018-09-16 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Piltti, J., Bygdell, J., Qu, C. & Lammi, M. (2018). Effects of long-term hypoxia in human chondrosarcoma cells. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 119(2), 2320-2332
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of long-term hypoxia in human chondrosarcoma cells
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, ISSN 0730-2312, E-ISSN 1097-4644, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 2320-2332Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cell-based therapies could be potential methods to treat damaged cartilage tissues. Instead of native hyaline cartilage, the current therapies generate mainly weaker fibrocartilage-type of repair tissue. A correct microenvironment influences the cellular phenotype, and together with external factors it can be used, e.g., to aid the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to defined types of differentiated adult cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of long-term exposure to 5% low oxygen atmosphere on human chondrosarcoma HCS-2/8 cells. This atmosphere is close to normal oxygen tension of cartilage tissue. The proteome was analyzed with label-free mass spectrometric method and further bioinformatic analysis. The qRT-PCR method was used to gene expression analysis, and ELISA and dimethylmethylene blue assays for type II collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan measurements. The hypoxic atmosphere did not influence cell proliferation, but enhanced slightly ACAN and COL2A1 gene expression. Proteomic screening revealed a number of hypoxia-induced protein level responses. Increased ones included NDUFA4L2, P4HA1, NDRG1, MIF, LDHA, PYGL, while TXNRD1, BAG2, TXN2, AQSTM1, TNFRSF1B and EPHX1 decreased during the long-term hypoxia. Also a number of proteins previously not related to hypoxia changed during the treatment. Of those S100P, RPSS26, NDUFB11, CDV3 and TUBB8 had elevated levels, while ALCAM, HLA-B, EIF1, and ACOT9 were lower in the hypoxia samples. In conclusion, low oxygen condition causes changes in the cellular amounts of several proteins.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
chondrosarcoma, extracellular matrix, hypoxia, label-free quantitative proteomics, S100 proteins
National Category
Cell Biology Cell and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry; cellforskning; Medical Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138929 (URN)10.1002/jcb.26394 (DOI)000418708300098 ()28865129 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Rheumatism Association, R-567071
Available from: 2017-09-04 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ning, Y., Wang, X., Zhang, P., Anatoly, S. V., Prakash, N. T., Li, C., . . . Guo, X. (2018). Imbalance of dietary nutrients and the associated differentially expressed genes and pathways may play important roles in juvenile Kashin-Beck disease. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, 50, 441-460, Article ID 29426639.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imbalance of dietary nutrients and the associated differentially expressed genes and pathways may play important roles in juvenile Kashin-Beck disease
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0946-672X, E-ISSN 1878-3252, Vol. 50, p. 441-460, article id 29426639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is a childhood-onset endemic osteoarthropathy in China. Nutrients including trace elements may play active roles in the development of KBD.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to estimate the nutrient intakes of children in endemic areas and to identify the imbalanced nutrients associated differentially expressed genes in the juvenile patients with KBD.

METHODS:

In this cross-sectional study, a consecutive 3 day 24 h semi-quantitative dietary retrospect questionnaire was conducted to estimate the daily nutrient intakes of children using CDGSS 3.0 software. Gene profile analysis was employed to identify differentially expressed genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of children with KBD. GOC, CTD, KEGG, and REACTOME databases were used to establish the relationship between nutrients and nutrients-associated differentially expressed genes and pathways. Statistical analyses were accomplished by SPSS 18.0 software.

RESULTS:

Daily Se intakes without supplementation of children were significantly lower in Se-supplemented (Se + ) KBD areas (29.3 ∼ 29.6 mg/d) and non-endemic area (27.8 ± 7.9 mg/d) compared to non-Se-supplemented (Se-) KBD area (32.9 ± 7.9 mg/d, c2 = 20.24, P < .01). Children in Se+ KBD areas were suffering more serious insufficient intake of multiple nutrients, including vitamins-B2/-C/-E, Ca, Fe, Zn and I. Gene profile analysis combined with bioinformatics technique identified 34 nutrients associated differentially expressed genes and 10 significant pathways which are related to the pathological changes in juvenile KBD.

CONCLUSIONS:

Imbalance of dietary nutrients and nutrients-associated differentially expressed genes and pathways may play important roles in the development of juvenile KBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Children, Differentially expressed genes, Kashin-Beck disease, Nutrients, Selenium
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
cellforskning; Nutrition; Molecular Cellbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147560 (URN)10.1016/j.jtemb.2018.01.012 (DOI)29426639 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Wang, S., Lv, Y., Wang, Y., Du, P., Tan, W., Lammi, M. & Guo, X. (2018). Network analysis of Se-and Zn-related proteins in the serum proteomics expression profile of the endemic dilated cardiomyopathy Keshan disease. Biological Trace Element Research, 183(1), 40-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Network analysis of Se-and Zn-related proteins in the serum proteomics expression profile of the endemic dilated cardiomyopathy Keshan disease
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2018 (English)In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 183, no 1, p. 40-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Keshan disease (KD) is an endemic cardiomyopathy with high mortality. Selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) deficiencies are closely related to KD. The molecular mechanism of KD pathogenesis is still unclear. There are only few studies on the interaction of trace elements and proteins associated with the pathogenesis of KD. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-coupled two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (2DLC-MS/MS) technique analysis was used to analyze the differential expression of proteins from serum samples. Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) was used to screen Se- and Zn-associated proteins. Then, pathway and network analyses of Se- and Zn-associated proteins were constituted by Cytoscape ClueGO and GeneMANIA plugins. One hundred and five differentially expressed proteins were obtained by 2DLC-MS/MS, among them 19 Se- and 3 Zn-associated proteins. Fifty-two pathways were identified from ClueGO and 1 network from GeneMANIA analyses. The results showed that Se-associated proteins STAT3 and MAPK1 and Zn-associated proteins HIF1A and PARP1, the proteins involved in HIF-1 signaling pathway and apoptosis pathway, may play significant roles in the pathogenesis of KD. The approach of this study would be also beneficial for further dissecting molecular mechanism of other trace element-associated disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Cardiomyocyte, GeneGO, GeneMANIA, Keshan disease, Trace element, iTRAQ
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Biochemistry; Medicine, cardiovascular disease
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138316 (URN)10.1007/s12011-017-1063-6 (DOI)000429359900006 ()28819918 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-08-19 Created: 2017-08-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ning, Y., Wang, X., Guo, X., Zhang, P., Qu, P., Zhang, F., . . . Lammi, M. (2018). Nutrients other than selenium are important for promoting children's health in Kashin-Beck disease areas. Biological Trace Element Research, 183(2), 233-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nutrients other than selenium are important for promoting children's health in Kashin-Beck disease areas
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2018 (English)In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 183, no 2, p. 233-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Overall nutritional status has been proved associated with people's health. The overall nutritional status of children in Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) areas has been overlooked for decades. Therefore, it is worth investigating in the current generation to gather evidence and make suggestions for improvement. A cross-sectional study with three 24-h dietary recalls was conducted to collect raw data on the daily food intake of children. Recorded food was converted into daily nutrient intakes using CDGSS 3.0 software. WHO AnthroPlus software was used to analyse the BMI-for-age z-score (BAZ) for estimating the overall nutrition status of children. All the comparisons and regression analyses were conducted with SPSS 18.0 software. Multiple nutrient intakes among children from the Se-supplemented KBD-endemic were under the estimated average requirement. The protein-to-carbohydrate ratio (P/C ratio) was significantly higher in children from the non-Se-supplemented KBD-endemic area than the other areas (< 0.001). The children's BAZ was negatively associated with age (B = -0.095, P < 0.001) and the number of KBD relatives (B = -0.277, P = 0.04), and it was positively associated with better housing conditions, receiving colostrum, and daily intakes of niacin and zinc by multivariate regression analysis (F = 10.337, R = 0.609, P < 0.001).Compared to non-Se-supplemented KBD-endemic area and non-endemic areas, children in Se-supplemented KBD-endemic areas have an insufficient intake of multiple nutrients. School breakfast and lunch programmes are recommended, and strict implementation is the key to ensuring a positive effect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
BMI-for-age-z-score, Children, Kashin-Beck disease, Nutrient intake, Overall nutrition
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Pediatrics
Research subject
Nutrition; Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139577 (URN)10.1007/s12011-017-1154-4 (DOI)000431689100007 ()28921450 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wang, S., Yan, R., Wang, B., Du, P., Tan, W., Lammi, M. J. & Guo, X. (2018). Prediction of co-expression genes and integrative analysis of gene microarray and proteomics profile of Keshan disease. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 231.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediction of co-expression genes and integrative analysis of gene microarray and proteomics profile of Keshan disease
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Keshan disease (KD) is a kind of endemic cardiomyopathy which has a high mortality. However, molecular mechanism in the pathogenesis of KD remains poorly understood. Serum samples were collected from 112 KD patients and 112 normal controls. Gene microarray was used to screen differently expressed genes. Genevestigator was applied to forecast co-expression genes of significant gene. iTRAQ proteomics analysis was used to verify significant genes and their co-expression genes. GO, COG, IPA and STRING were applied to undertake function categorization, pathway and network analysis separately. We identified 32 differentially expressed genes; IDH2, FEM1A, SSPB1 and their respective 30 co-expression genes; 68 differential proteins in KD. Significant proteins were categorized into 23 biological processes, 16 molecular functions, 16 cellular components, 15 function classes, 13 KD pathways and 1 network. IDH2, FEM1A, SSBP1, CALR, NDUFS2, IDH3A, GAPDH, TCA Cycle II (Eukaryotic) pathway and NADP repair pathway may play important roles in the pathogenesis of KD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Nature Publishing Group, 2018
Keywords
Keshan disease, cardiomyopathy, protoemics, gene array, integrative analysis
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Cell and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Cardiology; Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143903 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-18599-x (DOI)000419668400005 ()29321553 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-14 Created: 2018-01-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lammi, M. & Qu, C. (2018). Selenium-Related Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(9), Article ID 2665.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selenium-Related Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 19, no 9, article id 2665Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The selenium content of the body is known to control the expression levels of numerous genes, both so-called selenoproteins and non-selenoproteins. Selenium is a trace element essential to human health, and its deficiency is related to, for instance, cardiovascular and myodegenerative diseases, infertility and osteochondropathy called Kashin⁻Beck disease. It is incorporated as selenocysteine to the selenoproteins, which protect against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. They also participate in the activation of the thyroid hormone, and play a role in immune system functioning. The synthesis and incorporation of selenocysteine occurs via a special mechanism, which differs from the one used for standard amino acids. The codon for selenocysteine is a regular in-frame stop codon, which can be passed by a specific complex machinery participating in translation elongation and termination. This includes a presence of selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) in the 3'-untranslated part of the selenoprotein mRNAs. Nonsense-mediated decay is involved in the regulation of the selenoprotein mRNA levels, but other mechanisms are also possible. Recent transcriptional analyses of messenger RNAs, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs combined with proteomic data of samples from Keshan and Kashin⁻Beck disease patients have identified new possible cellular pathways related to transcriptional regulation by selenium.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
nonsense-mediated decay, selenium, selenocysteine, selenocysteine insertion sequence, selenoproteins
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Biochemistry; cellforskning; Medical Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151887 (URN)10.3390/ijms19092665 (DOI)30205557 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053079645 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-15 Created: 2018-09-15 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Florea, C., Tanska, P., Mononen, M., Qu, C., Lammi, M., Laasanen, M. & Korhonen, R. (2017). A combined experimental atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation and computational modeling approach to unravel the key contributors to the time-dependent mechanical behavior of single cells. Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, 16(1), 297-311, Article ID 27554263.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A combined experimental atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation and computational modeling approach to unravel the key contributors to the time-dependent mechanical behavior of single cells
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2017 (English)In: Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, ISSN 1617-7959, E-ISSN 1617-7940, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 297-311, article id 27554263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellular responses to mechanical stimuli are influenced by the mechanical properties of cells and the surrounding tissue matrix. Cells exhibit viscoelastic behavior in response to an applied stress. This has been attributed to fluid flow-dependent and flow-independent mechanisms. However, the particular mechanism that controls the local time-dependent behavior of cells is unknown. Here, a combined approach of experimental AFM nanoindentation with computational modeling is proposed, taking into account complex material behavior. Three constitutive models (porohyperelastic, viscohyperelastic, poroviscohyperelastic) in tandem with optimization algorithms were employed to capture the experimental stress relaxation data of chondrocytes at 5 % strain. The poroviscohyperelastic models with and without fluid flow allowed through the cell membrane provided excellent description of the experimental time-dependent cell responses (normalized mean squared error (NMSE) of 0.003 between the model and experiments). The viscohyperelastic model without fluid could not follow the entire experimental data that well (NMSE = 0.005), while the porohyperelastic model could not capture it at all (NMSE = 0.383). We also show by parametric analysis that the fluid flow has a small, but essential effect on the loading phase and short-term cell relaxation response, while the solid viscoelasticity controls the longer-term responses. We suggest that the local time-dependent cell mechanical response is determined by the combined effects of intrinsic viscoelasticity of the cytoskeleton and fluid flow redistribution in the cells, although the contribution of fluid flow is smaller when using a nanosized probe and moderate indentation rate. The present approach provides new insights into viscoelastic responses of chondrocytes, important for further understanding cell mechanobiological mechanisms in health and disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2017
Keywords
Cell mechanics, Chondrocyte, Stress relaxation, Atomic force microscopy, Nanoindentation, Poroviscohyperelastic, Finite element analysis
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Cell Biology Biophysics Other Physics Topics
Research subject
cellforskning; biomechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125208 (URN)10.1007/s10237-016-0817-y (DOI)000394153400021 ()27554263 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Han, J., Li, D., Qu, C., Wang, D., Wang, L., Guo, X. & Lammi, M. (2017). Altered expression of chondroitin sulfate structure modifying sulfotransferases in the articular cartilage from adult osteoarthritis and Kashin-Beck disease. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 25(8), 1372-1375, Article ID 28274888.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered expression of chondroitin sulfate structure modifying sulfotransferases in the articular cartilage from adult osteoarthritis and Kashin-Beck disease
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2017 (English)In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 1372-1375, article id 28274888Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the expression of enzymes involved in chondroitin sulfate (CS) sulfation in the articular cartilage isolated from adult patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and Kashin-Beck disease (KBD), using normal adults as controls.

METHODS: Articular cartilage samples were collected from normal, OA and KBD adults aged 38-60 years old, and divided into three groups with six individual subjects in each group. The morphology and pathology grading of knee joint cartilage was examined by Safranin O staining. The localization and expression of enzymes involved in CS sulfation (CHST-3, CHST-11, CHST-12, CHST-13, CHST-15, and UST) were examined by immunohistochemical staining and semi-quantitative analysis.

RESULTS: Positive staining rates for anabolic enzymes CHST-3, CHST-12, CHST-15, and UST were lower in the KBD and OA groups than those in the control group. Meanwhile, reduced levels of CHST-11, and CHST-13 in KBD group were observed, in contrast to those in OA and control groups. The expressions of all six CS sulfation enzymes were less detected in the superficial and deep zones of KBD cartilage compared with control and OA cartilage.

CONCLUSION: The reduced expression of the CS structure modifying sulfotransferases in the chondrocytes of both KBD and OA adult patients may provide explanations for their cartilage damages, and therapeutic targets for their treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Kashin-Beck disease, adult cartilage, chondroitin sulfate, osteoarthritis, sulfation, sulfotransferases
National Category
Orthopaedics Cell and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Medicine, rheumatology; Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132341 (URN)10.1016/j.joca.2017.02.803 (DOI)000405584300020 ()28274888 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6181-9904

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