umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Klaus, M., Seekell, D. A., Lidberg, W. & Karlsson, J. (2019). Evaluations of Climate and Land Management Effects on Lake Carbon Cycling Need to Account Temporal Variability in CO2 Concentration. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 33(3), 243-265
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluations of Climate and Land Management Effects on Lake Carbon Cycling Need to Account Temporal Variability in CO2 Concentration
2019 (English)In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 243-265Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in lakes vary strongly over time. This variability is rarely captured by environmental monitoring but is crucial for accurately assessing the magnitude of lake CO2 emissions. However, it is unknown to what extent temporal variability needs to be captured to understand important drivers of lake carbon cycling such as climate and land management. We used environmental monitoring data of Swedish forest lakes collected in autumn (n = 439) and throughout the whole open water season (n = 22) from a wet and a dry year to assess temporal variability in effects of climate and forestry on CO2 concentrations across lakes. Effects differed depending on the season and year sampled. According to cross-lake comparisons based on autumn data, CO2 concentrations increased with annual mean air temperature (dry year) or catchment forest productivity (wet year) but were not related to colored dissolved organic matter concentrations. In contrast, open water-season averaged CO2 concentrations were similar across temperature and productivity gradients but increased with colored dissolved organic matter. These contradictions resulted from scale mismatches in input data, lead to weak explanatory power (R-2 = 9-32%), and were consistent across published data from 79 temperate, boreal, and arctic lakes. In a global survey of 144 published studies, we identified a trade-off between temporal and spatial coverage of CO2 sampling. This trade-off clearly determines which conclusions are drawn from landscape-scale CO(2 )assessments. Accurate evaluations of the effects of climate and land management require spatially and temporally representative data that can be provided by emerging sensor technologies and forms of collaborative sampling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2019
Keywords
carbon cycling, lake, seasonality, sampling, greenhouse gas, structural equation modeling
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158600 (URN)10.1029/2018GB005979 (DOI)000464651600002 ()
Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved
D'Odorico, P., Carr, J. A., Davis, K. F., Dell'Angelo, J. & Seekell, D. A. (2019). Food Inequality, Injustice, and Rights. BioScience, 69(3), 180-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food Inequality, Injustice, and Rights
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 180-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As humanity continues to grow in size, questions related to human rights and the existing unequal distribution of food resources have taken on greater urgency. Is inequality in food access unjust or a regrettable consequence of the geographic distribution of biophysical resources? To what extent are there obligations to redress inequalities in access to food? We draw from a human rights perspective to identify obligations associated with access to food and develop a quantitative framework to evaluate the fulfillment of the human right to food. We discuss the capacity of socioeconomic development to reduce inequalities in per capita food availability with respect to the distribution of biophysical resources among countries. Although, at the country level, international trade shows the capacity to reduce human rights deficits by increasing food availability in countries with limited food production, whether it actually improves the fulfillment of the right to food will depend on within-country inequality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
food security, human rights, international trade, inequality, agriculture
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158104 (URN)10.1093/biosci/biz002 (DOI)000462615500006 ()30899122 (PubMedID)
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Seekell, D. A., Lapierre, J. & Cheruvelil, K. S. (2018). A geography of lake carbon cycling. Limnology and Oceanography Letters, 3(3), 49-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A geography of lake carbon cycling
2018 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 49-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbon cycling in lakes is highly variable among lakes within regions, and across regions and continents, but the underlying causes of this variation among lakes and regions are not well understood. In this essay, we propose two main mechanisms that operate at the regional scale and contribute to broad‐scale interlake variation in carbon cycling. This essay sets the foundation for a geographic understanding of lake carbon cycling, which facilitates developing testable hypotheses to improve estimates of the role of inland waters in global elemental cycles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154436 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10078 (DOI)000456696200003 ()
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Seekell, D., D'Odorico, P. & MacDonald, G. K. (2018). Food, trade, and the environment. Environmental Research Letters, 13(10), Article ID 100201.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food, trade, and the environment
2018 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 13, no 10, article id 100201Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOP Publishing Ltd, 2018
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154434 (URN)10.1088/1748-9326/aae065 (DOI)000445932700001 ()2-s2.0-85055816684 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Seekell, D. A., Byström, P. & Karlsson, J. (2018). Lake morphometry moderates the relationship between water color and fish biomass in small boreal lakes. Limnology and Oceanography, 63(5), 2171-2178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lake morphometry moderates the relationship between water color and fish biomass in small boreal lakes
2018 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 2171-2178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lake morphometry may moderate the effects of water color on fish biomass in boreal lakes, but empirical evidence is scarce because there are a limited number of lakes for which both water color and bathymetry have been measured. We evaluated variations in catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE), an indicator of fish biomass, across orthogonal gradients of light extinction and mean depth in 16 small Swedish lakes (mean depth 1.7-4.8 m, surface area 1-10 ha). Multiple regression coefficients indicated that the effect of light extinction on CPUE was negative, and that the relationship was more negative for deeper lakes than it was for shallower lakes. The pattern was strongest for lakes with mean depths between 2.1 m and 3.5 m. We estimated that 26% of small lakes in boreal Sweden fall within this mean depth range. These results contribute to the growing understanding of how variations in water color and lake morphometry influence patterns of fish biomass across the boreal landscape.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153666 (URN)10.1002/lno.10931 (DOI)000449045600021 ()
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 621-2011-3908Swedish Research Council, 621-2010-4675Swedish Research Council Formas, 215-2010-992
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Lapierre, J.-F., Collins, S. M., Seekell, D. A., Cheruvelil, K. S., Tan, P.-N., Skaff, N. K., . . . Soranno, P. A. (2018). Similarity in spatial structure constrains ecosystem relationships: Building a macroscale understanding of lakes. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 27(10), 1251-1263
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Similarity in spatial structure constrains ecosystem relationships: Building a macroscale understanding of lakes
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 1251-1263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: We aimed to measure the dominant spatial patterns in ecosystem properties (such as nutrients and measures of primary production) and the multi‐scaled geographical driver variables of these properties and to quantify how the spatial structure of pattern in all of these variables influences the strength of relationships among them.

Location and time period: We studied > 8,500 lakes in a 1.8 million km2 area of Northeast U.S.A. Data comprised 10‐year medians (2002–2011) for measured ecosystem properties, long‐term climate averages and recent land use/land cover variables.

Major taxa studied: We focused on ecosystem properties at the base of aquatic food webs, including concentrations of nutrients and algal pigments that are proxies of pri -mary productivity.

Methods: We quantified spatial structure in ecosystem properties and their geograph-ical driver variables using distance‐based Moran eigenvector maps (dbMEMs). We then compared the similarity in spatial structure for all pairs of variables with the cor -relation between variables to illustrate how spatial structure constrains relationships among ecosystem properties.

Results: The strength of spatial structure decreased in order for climate, land cover/use, lake ecosystem properties and lake and landscape morphometry. Having a compa -rable spatial structure is a necessary condition to observe a strong relationship be -tween a pair of variables, but not a sufficient one; variables with very different spatial structure are never strongly correlated. Lake ecosystem properties tended to have an intermediary spatial structure compared with that of their main drivers, probably be -cause climate and landscape variables with known ecological links induce spatial patterns.

Main conclusions: Our empirical results describe inherent spatial constraints that dic -tate the expected relationships between ecosystem properties and their geographical drivers at macroscales. Our results also suggest that understanding the spatial scales at which ecological processes operate is necessary to predict the effects of multi‐scaled environmental changes on ecosystem properties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
climate, ecosystem, lake, landscape, macroscales, Moran eigenvector maps, spatial autocorrelation, spatial scale, spatial structure
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153659 (URN)10.1111/geb.12781 (DOI)000449568800010 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
D'Odorico, P., Davis, K. F., Rosa, L., Carr, J. A., Chiarelli, D., Dell'Angelo, J., . . . Rulli, M. C. (2018). The global Food-Energy-Water Nexus. Reviews of geophysics, 56(3), 456-531
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The global Food-Energy-Water Nexus
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Reviews of geophysics, ISSN 8755-1209, E-ISSN 1944-9208, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 456-531Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water availability is a major factor constraining humanity's ability to meet the future food and energy needs of a growing and increasingly affluent human population. Water plays an important role in the production of energy, including renewable energy sources and the extraction of unconventional fossil fuels that are expected to become important players in future energy security. The emergent competition for water between the food and energy systems is increasingly recognized in the concept of the "food-energy-water nexus." The nexus between food and water is made even more complex by the globalization of agriculture and rapid growth in food trade, which results in a massive virtual transfer of water among regions and plays an important role in the food and water security of some regions. This review explores multiple components of the food-energy-water nexus and highlights possible approaches that could be used to meet food and energy security with the limited renewable water resources of the planet. Despite clear tensions inherent in meeting the growing and changing demand for food and energy in the 21st century, the inherent linkages among food, water, and energy systems can offer an opportunity for synergistic strategies aimed at resilient food, water, and energy security, such as the circular economy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2018
Keywords
Food-water nexus, FEW Nexus, Food Security, Water Security, Water Sustainability, Circular Economy
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153823 (URN)10.1029/2017RG000591 (DOI)000447805200001 ()
Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Rusak, J. A., Tanentzap, A. J., Klug, J. L., Rose, K. C., Hendricks, S. P., Jennings, E., . . . Zhu, G. (2018). Wind and trophic status explain within and among‐lake variability of algal biomass. Limnology and Oceanography Letters, 3(6), 409-418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wind and trophic status explain within and among‐lake variability of algal biomass
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 409-418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytoplankton biomass and production regulates key aspects of freshwater ecosystems yet its variability and subsequent predictability is poorly understood. We estimated within‐lake variation in biomass using high‐frequency chlorophyll fluorescence data from 18 globally distributed lakes. We tested how variation in fluorescence at monthly, daily, and hourly scales was related to high‐frequency variability of wind, water temperature, and radiation within lakes as well as productivity and physical attributes among lakes. Within lakes, monthly variation dominated, but combined daily and hourly variation were equivalent to that expressed monthly. Among lakes, biomass variability increased with trophic status while, within‐lake biomass variation increased with increasing variability in wind speed. Our results highlight the benefits of high‐frequency chlorophyll monitoring and suggest that predicted changes associated with climate, as well as ongoing cultural eutrophication, are likely to substantially increase the temporal variability of algal biomass and thus the predictability of the services it provides.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155598 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10093 (DOI)000456697200002 ()
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lapierre, J.-F., Seekell, D. A., Filstrup, C. T., Collins, S. M., Fergus, C. E., Soranno, P. A. & Cheruvelil, K. S. (2017). Continental-scale variation in controls of summer CO2 in United States lakes. Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences, 122(4), 875-885
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continental-scale variation in controls of summer CO2 in United States lakes
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences, ISSN 2169-8953, E-ISSN 2169-8961, Vol. 122, no 4, p. 875-885Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the broad-scale response of lake CO2 dynamics to global change is challenging because the relative importance of different controls of surface water CO2 is not known across broad geographic extents. Using geostatistical analyses of 1080 lakes in the conterminous United States, we found that lake partial pressure of CO2 (pCO(2)) was controlled by different chemical and biological factors related to inputs and losses of CO2 along climate, topography, geomorphology, and land use gradients. Despite weak spatial patterns in pCO(2) across the study extent, there were strong regional patterns in the pCO(2) driver-response relationships, i.e., in pCO(2) regulation. Because relationships between lake CO2 and its predictors varied spatially, global models performed poorly in explaining the variability in CO2 for U.S. lakes. The geographically varying driver-response relationships of lake pCO(2) reflected major landscape gradients across the study extent and pointed to the importance of regional-scale variation in pCO(2) regulation. These results indicate a higher level of organization for these physically disconnected systems than previously thought and suggest that changes in climate and land use could induce shifts in the main pathways that determine the role of lakes as sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2. Plain Language Summary In this study we show that changes in climate and terrestrial landscapes could affect which are the main mechanisms responsible for the widespread emissions of CO2 by lakes. Although mechanisms such as aquatic primary production, respiration by microorganisms, or terrestrial loadings of carbon have been studied extensively, their relative importance across broad geographic extents with different climate or land use remains unknown. Based on an analysis of 1080 lakes distributed across the continental U.S., we show that lake CO2 dynamics depend on the climate and landscape context where these lakes are found, such as precipitation, elevation, percent agriculture, or wetlands in the lakes catchments. We observed a widespread effect of in-lake primary production, while the color of water, which has often been identified as one of the main controls of lake CO2 in northern lakes, was important in only a small fraction of the lakes studied. Our results show that controls on lake CO2 dynamics vary geographically and that considering that variation will be important for creating accurate global carbon models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER GEOPHYSICL UNION, 2017
Keywords
lake, CO2, patterns, geographically weighted regression, regulation, aquatic carbon cycle
National Category
Physical Geography Climate Research Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136084 (URN)10.1002/2016JG003525 (DOI)000401171800009 ()
Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Seekell, D., Carr, J., Dell'Angelo, J., D'Odorico, P., Fader, M., Gephart, J., . . . Tavoni, A. (2017). Resilience in the global food system [Letter to the editor]. Environmental Research Letters, 12(2), Article ID 025010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resilience in the global food system
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 025010Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ensuring food security requires food production and distribution systems function throughout disruptions. Understanding the factors that contribute to the global food system's ability to respond and adapt to such disruptions (i.e. resilience) is critical for understanding the long-term sustainability of human populations. Variable impacts of production shocks on food supply between countries indicate a need for national-scale resilience indicators that can provide global comparisons. However, methods for tracking changes in resilience have had limited application to food systems. We developed an indicator-based analysis of food systems resilience for the years 1992-2011. Our approach is based on three dimensions of resilience: socio-economic access to food in terms of income of the poorest quintile relative to food prices, biophysical capacity to intensify or extensify food production, and the magnitude and diversity of current domestic food production. The socio-economic indicator has a large variability, but with low values concentrated in Africa and Asia. The biophysical capacity indicator is highest in Africa and Eastern Europe, in part because of a high potential for extensification of cropland and for yield gap closure in cultivated areas. However, the biophysical capacity indicator has declined globally in recent years. The production diversity indicator has increased slightly, with a relatively even geographic distribution. Few countries had exclusively high or low values for all indicators. Collectively, these results are the basis for global comparisons of resilience between countries, and provide necessary context for developing generalizations about resilience in the global food system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOP PUBLISHING LTD, 2017
Keywords
food security, resilience, food systems, food production, sustainability
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133440 (URN)10.1088/1748-9326/aa5730 (DOI)000395633200001 ()
Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6700-6149

Search in DiVA

Show all publications