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Wiberg, Mikael
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Publications (10 of 91) Show all publications
Ghajargar, M., Wiberg, M. & Stolterman, E. (2019). Designing places for reflection: an examination of social IoT as a relational approach in designing spaces for reflective thinking. In: Alessandro Soro, Margot Brereton, Paul Roe (Ed.), Social Internet of Things: (pp. 107-120). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing places for reflection: an examination of social IoT as a relational approach in designing spaces for reflective thinking
2019 (English)In: Social Internet of Things / [ed] Alessandro Soro, Margot Brereton, Paul Roe, Springer, 2019, p. 107-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sherry Turkle points out in her book, Evocative Objects, that we often consider objects as useful or aesthetic, but rarely count them as our companions or as provocations to our thoughts (2007). Indeed, according to distributed cognition theory, our cognitive activities are considerably influenced by and also a product of our interactions with external stimuli, such as everyday objects. Within this vast category of external stimuli, we can also include our indoor places: the architectural three-dimensional space, where we spend a large part of our days, doing various activities, using numerous objects, and interacting with people. With the advent of "smarter" homes and the Internet of Things (IoT), space becomes a crucial factor that, together with all other objects, influence peoples' thinking. We are particularly interested in the kind of thinking that can be labeled as "reflective thinking" as a conceptual way of thinking that enables the re-consideration of experiences and actions. Reflective thinking also as a distributed cognitive process depends not only to the individual mental process, but also it is closely related to the external stimuli (e.g. Hutchins, Cognition in the wild. MIT Press, 1995, [1], Dewey, How we think: A restatement of the relation of reflective thinking to the educative process. D.C. Heath & Co Publishers, USA, 1933, [2]). In this book chapter, we present a relational approach to the design of such places considering the social IoT (SIoT) as a technical enabler. We do this by specifically focusing on "reflective thinking" and how it is situated in relation to computer-enhanced and smart places. We will describe how reflective thinking is related to people's activities and smart objects within that place. Further, we provide models intended to clarify the relationships between the external factors that influence reflective thinking in a space, and how those relationships make a space a Place (Cresswell, International encyclopedia of human geography, 8, 169–177. Elsevier, Oxford, 2009, [3]). Finally, we provide an example in the form of a narrative, to show how might an SIoT-enabled place look like in prototyping lab of a design school as a very specific place. In short, the aim of our work as presented in this chapter is to spark a conversation and discussion about how HCI/Interaction Design can engage in designing of places that supports reflection using Social IoT. In doing so, we suggest that a central dimension in design of such places should be based on the study of relationships among involved components: people, their activities, and objects. We also suggest, as a theoretical contribution, that Social IoT is not only a technical platform, but rather should be understood as a relational technology that enables new kinds of places for reflection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Internet of Things, Technology, Communications and Computing, ISSN 2199-1073
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
människa-dator interaktion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150566 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-94659-7_6 (DOI)9783319946573 (ISBN)9783319946597 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2019-07-03Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, M. & Stolterman, E. (2019). Philosophy, HCI, and ‘Thought Styles’. In: : . Paper presented at CHI´19 (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems) "Weaving the threads of CHI", Glasgow, Scotland, UK, May 4-9, 2019.. ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Philosophy, HCI, and ‘Thought Styles’
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this workshop position paper, we exemplify and elaborate on how “Standing on the Shoulders of Giants” i.e. a turn to philosophy can be a very useful approach to move forward in our exploration of HCI. In line with the call for this workshop we suggest that the classic notion of “thought styles”, a notion originally developed and proposed by Ludwick Fleck, and later introduced to the HCI community by Janlert & Stolterman might be useful as a conceptual vehicle for further explorations. Further, we elaborate on how this notion might serve as a conceptual backbone for the development of new interactive systems. We explore this notion of ‘thought styles’ by revisiting its historical and philosophical roots, and we discuss how philosophical methods including questioning, critical discussion, rational argument, and systematic presentation in relation to ‘thought styles’ and in the context of HCI might be useful. Finally, and on a more fundamental level, we conclude our position paper by acknowledging that we have a lot to gain from further explorations at the intersection of philosophy and HCI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Press, 2019
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158870 (URN)
Conference
CHI´19 (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems) "Weaving the threads of CHI", Glasgow, Scotland, UK, May 4-9, 2019.
Note

Workshop position paper for “Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: Exploring the Intersection of Philosophy and HCI", CHI´ 19, Glasgow Scotland, UK, May 4-9, 2019.

Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, M. (2018). Addressing IoT: towards material-centered interaction design. In: International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: . Paper presented at International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (pp. 198-207). Springer, 10901
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing IoT: towards material-centered interaction design
2018 (English)In: International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Springer, 2018, Vol. 10901, p. 198-207Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper takes a point of departure in how IoT-the Internet of Things-is increasingly described as the next step forward for digitalization. As a background to this trend I describe how a great number of applied research projects and development efforts has been conducted to address various specific needs. Further, I argue in this paper that there is still a lack of a stable knowledge base–including developed theories and methods-for working across physical and digital materials in the design of IoT solutions. Motivated by this identified lack of methods this paper presents a theoretical and empirical ground for the development of a material-centered approach to the design of IoT systems. The proposed method is focused on material interactions as an approach for working across physical and digital materials in design. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
människa-dator interaktion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150568 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-91238-7_17 (DOI)000450991000017 ()978-3-319-91237-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-91238-7 (ISBN)
Conference
International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Roto, V., Wiberg, M. & Sarkola, S. (2018). Branded online interaction aesthetics: strengthening brand image via dynamic design. In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: . Paper presented at NordiCHI, Oslo, Norway, October 1-13, 2018 (pp. 385-396). ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Branded online interaction aesthetics: strengthening brand image via dynamic design
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, ACM Digital Library, 2018, p. 385-396Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

While the knowledge base on the role of aesthetics in the use and design of interactive technologies is growing, using interaction aesthetics for communicating the brand identity is an unexplored research topic. This paper focuses on aesthetics of branded interaction in the online services domain. The reported study includes a literature review at the intersection of brand and interaction aesthetics and a detailed analysis of branded interaction aesthetics on a web site. The contributions of the work include status of scientific literature in this area, a definition for branded online interaction aesthetics, an initial analysis framework for branded online interaction aesthetics, and research topics for the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2018
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156147 (URN)10.1145/3240167.3240208 (DOI)978-1-4503-6437-9 (ISBN)
Conference
NordiCHI, Oslo, Norway, October 1-13, 2018
Available from: 2019-02-06 Created: 2019-02-06 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Ghajargar, M., Wiberg, M. & Stolterman, E. (2018). Designing IoT Systems that Support Reflective Thinking: A Relational Approach. International Journal of Design, 12(1), 21-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing IoT Systems that Support Reflective Thinking: A Relational Approach
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Systems are, to a large extent, about relationships between people, activities, objects, technologies, and places. A systems approach focuses on how things are interrelated, and what the different parts can accomplish together. In similar terms, reflective thinking is also relational. We think often with each other when we talk about and share our experiences and memories. We are also increasingly using smart objects for our everyday activities. However, designing IoT (Internet of Things) devices typically relies on artifacts rather than relationships. In this paper, we present a modeling technique for the design and analysis of IoT artifacts and systems that is fundamentally relational in its approach. Having outlined the need for relational approaches to designing IoT systems, we first present three examples, where we demonstrate how our relational approach allows for the analysis of existing smart objects designed to function in different relationships with the user, user activity and the situation. Accordingly, we present these IoT systems from the perspectives of the augment me, the comply with me, and the engage me relational models. Having presented these three examples that illustrate how IoT systems can be analyzed as systems of relationships, we then present the prototype of an IoT artifact intended to support reflection in the user. With this fourth example, we introduce the make me think relationship, and also show how our modeling technique can be useful for design of new IoT systems. Accordingly, we suggest a modeling technique that can be used as a tool for designing and analyzing IoT systems. We believe this modeling technique can contribute to a relational approach toward IoT. We conclude this paper suggesting that our proposed modeling technique cannot only help to model relationships between a user and a smart object, but can also be scaled, allowing for the modeling of more complex IoT systems, where there are an increased number of users using many smart objects in different places, but still integrated as a complex system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 2018
Keywords
IoT system, design, modeling, reflection, relationships, smart object
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-149033 (URN)000433028000003 ()
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, M. & Wiberg, C. (2018). Digital integration in the 3rd wave of mobile HCI: a key challenge for overcoming the inverted digital divide. International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 10(2), 57-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital integration in the 3rd wave of mobile HCI: a key challenge for overcoming the inverted digital divide
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, ISSN 1942-390X, E-ISSN 1942-3918, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What does the 3rd wave of mobile computing hold for us, and what are the challenges ahead as we now move from the 1st and 2nd wave to the 3rd wave of mobile HCI? While the 1st wave enabled mobile computing on a basic level – including basic connectivity and the development of mobile devices – and while the 2nd wave was to a large extent about the development of mobile content (from digital services and apps, to services for storing our data in the cloud), the authors suggest that the 3rd wave of mobile computing is less technology-driven, but rather about what mobile computing can enable, and how mobile computing is increasingly a gateway to society at large. In this article, the authors focus specifically on this 3rd wave of mobile computing, and in particular on what they call an inverted digital divide – a state where the mobile technology is in place for its users, but where there is no access to the services in society that rely on mobile computing. In this article, the authors demonstrate this inverted digital divide through a number of examples where they show how this plays out for different groups of people where this is vital in a global world – e.g., visitors to a country such as tourists, immigrants and even people applying for asylum. The authors discuss what is needed in order to bridge this divide and they outline its implications for the further development of mobile services. In concluding this paper, the authors suggest that “digital integration” might serve as a key notion for resolving these issues as we now enter the 3rd wave of mobile HCI.

National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145679 (URN)10.4018/IJMHCI.2018040103 (DOI)000431082900004 ()
Available from: 2018-03-14 Created: 2018-03-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, M. (2018). FlexiWall: The design and development of a prototype system that integrates Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, architecture and mobile interaction. In: Proceedings of the 51st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences: . Paper presented at 51st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-51), January 3-6, 2018. Hawaii: University of Hawaii
Open this publication in new window or tab >>FlexiWall: The design and development of a prototype system that integrates Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, architecture and mobile interaction
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 51st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Hawaii: University of Hawaii , 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present the final step of our Internet of Things (IoT) project called FlexiWall. On an overall level, FlexiWall is a fully working prototype system in the form of an interactive wall element that demonstrates how IoT technologies can be seamlessly integrated in our built environment. In this paper we present the background and the design of the FlexiWall prototype, and we suggest that the FlexiWall prototype demonstrate how Internet of Things (IoT) technologies can be embedded in the everyday architecture of a building as an ambient information display, or as an embedded surface for interaction. Further on, we suggest that FlexiWall works as an illustration of how technologies can be seamlessly embedded in our everyday environments, how it materializes interaction in our built environment, and how the Internet of Things open up new opportunities for systems design the ranges from mobile solutions, to embedded solutions, to interaction across mobile and embedded systems in these new environments. In short and if now directing our attention to the design part of our project as reported in this paper we view the FlexiWall prototype as an interactive, flexible, and wood-based wall element that can bend as to form the light that shines through it as to display different patterns. As such, FlexiWall illustrates a novel ambient display that can be fully embedded in the architecture of a building. We present the background of this design project, including our method that rely on a concept-driven approach to interaction design, and we also present how we draw on theories of light design in architecture in the design of FlexiWall. Further on, we present how our work is related to some existing work in this area, and we present the design and implementation of this interactive wall. Having presented this project we discuss how our work adds to the current body of research within the area of the Internet of Things and mobile interaction with embedded systems before concluding the paper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hawaii: University of Hawaii, 2018
Keywords
Wearable Technology and the Internet of Everything Architecture; Concept design; Internet of Things; Mobile Interaction; Prototype
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
människa-dator interaktion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-149093 (URN)978-0-9981331-1-9 (ISBN)
Conference
51st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-51), January 3-6, 2018
Available from: 2018-06-15 Created: 2018-06-15 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Moradi, F. & Wiberg, M. (2018). NEAT-Lamp and Talking Tree: Beyond Personal Informatics towards Active Workplaces. Computers, 7(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>NEAT-Lamp and Talking Tree: Beyond Personal Informatics towards Active Workplaces
2018 (English)In: Computers, E-ISSN 2073-431X, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A growing number of personal informatics (PI) systems have been designed to break the habit of prolonged sitting and to encourage physical activity during workdays and leisure hours. Few studies, however, have investigated the nature of local movement and mobility in workspaces. Relatively little is known about how such movement patterns are shaped and in what ways micro-mobility in workplaces could be increased. By undertaking a concept-driven design approach, and on the basis of our ethnographic prestudy, we introduce a conceptual framework. In this conceptual framework, we indicate the five main agencies that shape local movement and mobility among office workers. On the basis of this empirical and conceptual work, two prototypes, the non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)-Lamp and Talking Tree, have been designed, implemented and observed in an office environment. This paper describes this design project and articulates the role of discussions in socially established settings in work environments in order to increase daily movement. The paper concludes by highlighting not only technology, but also collective reflections to spark behavioral change in office environments as social settings. 

Keywords
design, personal informatics, quantified self, workspace, ambient displays
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
människa-dator interaktion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150564 (URN)10.3390/computers7010004 (DOI)000434429200004 ()
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
Ågerfalk, P. & Wiberg, M. (2018). Pragmatizing the normative artifact: design science research in scandinavia and beyond. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 43(1), 68-77, Article ID 4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pragmatizing the normative artifact: design science research in scandinavia and beyond
2018 (English)In: Communications of the Association for Information Systems, ISSN 1529-3181, E-ISSN 1529-3181, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 68-77, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this panel report, we analyze the discussion that unfolded during the “Design Science Research: A Scandinavian Approach?” panel held at the third Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems in Sigtuna, Sweden, in August, 2012. The second author of this paper chaired the panel, which also included Tone Bratteteig, Shirley Gregor, Ola Henfridsson, Alan Hevner, Jan Pries-Heje, and Tuure Tuunanen as panelists. Three themes that highlight how the design of artifacts contributes to knowledge production emerged during the panel. The first theme addresses our responsibility, as a research community, to come up not only with descriptions of the world but also to try to change things into preferable states. The second theme emphasizes that knowledge production also happens through the design of artifacts. The third theme identifies an apparent pragmatic turn in our discipline. 

Keywords
Design, Design Science, Participatory Design, Scandinavian Approach, Action Research
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151421 (URN)10.17705/1CAIS.04304 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, M. (2018). The materiality of interaction: notes on the materials of interaction design. MIT Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The materiality of interaction: notes on the materials of interaction design
2018 (English)Book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2018. p. 192
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147261 (URN)9780262037518 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-01 Created: 2018-05-01 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
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