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Wiberg, Mikael
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Publications (10 of 86) Show all publications
Wiberg, M. (2018). Addressing IoT: towards material-centered interaction design. In: International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: . Paper presented at International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (pp. 198-207). Springer, 10901
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing IoT: towards material-centered interaction design
2018 (English)In: International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Springer, 2018, Vol. 10901, p. 198-207Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper takes a point of departure in how IoT-the Internet of Things-is increasingly described as the next step forward for digitalization. As a background to this trend I describe how a great number of applied research projects and development efforts has been conducted to address various specific needs. Further, I argue in this paper that there is still a lack of a stable knowledge base–including developed theories and methods-for working across physical and digital materials in the design of IoT solutions. Motivated by this identified lack of methods this paper presents a theoretical and empirical ground for the development of a material-centered approach to the design of IoT systems. The proposed method is focused on material interactions as an approach for working across physical and digital materials in design. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
människa-dator interaktion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150568 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-91238-7_17 (DOI)000450991000017 ()978-3-319-91237-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-91238-7 (ISBN)
Conference
International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Ghajargar, M., Wiberg, M. & Stolterman, E. (2018). Designing IoT Systems that Support Reflective Thinking: A Relational Approach. International Journal of Design, 12(1), 21-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing IoT Systems that Support Reflective Thinking: A Relational Approach
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Systems are, to a large extent, about relationships between people, activities, objects, technologies, and places. A systems approach focuses on how things are interrelated, and what the different parts can accomplish together. In similar terms, reflective thinking is also relational. We think often with each other when we talk about and share our experiences and memories. We are also increasingly using smart objects for our everyday activities. However, designing IoT (Internet of Things) devices typically relies on artifacts rather than relationships. In this paper, we present a modeling technique for the design and analysis of IoT artifacts and systems that is fundamentally relational in its approach. Having outlined the need for relational approaches to designing IoT systems, we first present three examples, where we demonstrate how our relational approach allows for the analysis of existing smart objects designed to function in different relationships with the user, user activity and the situation. Accordingly, we present these IoT systems from the perspectives of the augment me, the comply with me, and the engage me relational models. Having presented these three examples that illustrate how IoT systems can be analyzed as systems of relationships, we then present the prototype of an IoT artifact intended to support reflection in the user. With this fourth example, we introduce the make me think relationship, and also show how our modeling technique can be useful for design of new IoT systems. Accordingly, we suggest a modeling technique that can be used as a tool for designing and analyzing IoT systems. We believe this modeling technique can contribute to a relational approach toward IoT. We conclude this paper suggesting that our proposed modeling technique cannot only help to model relationships between a user and a smart object, but can also be scaled, allowing for the modeling of more complex IoT systems, where there are an increased number of users using many smart objects in different places, but still integrated as a complex system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 2018
Keywords
IoT system, design, modeling, reflection, relationships, smart object
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-149033 (URN)000433028000003 ()
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, M. & Wiberg, C. (2018). Digital integration in the 3rd wave of mobile HCI: a key challenge for overcoming the inverted digital divide. International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 10(2), 57-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital integration in the 3rd wave of mobile HCI: a key challenge for overcoming the inverted digital divide
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, ISSN 1942-390X, E-ISSN 1942-3918, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What does the 3rd wave of mobile computing hold for us, and what are the challenges ahead as we now move from the 1st and 2nd wave to the 3rd wave of mobile HCI? While the 1st wave enabled mobile computing on a basic level – including basic connectivity and the development of mobile devices – and while the 2nd wave was to a large extent about the development of mobile content (from digital services and apps, to services for storing our data in the cloud), the authors suggest that the 3rd wave of mobile computing is less technology-driven, but rather about what mobile computing can enable, and how mobile computing is increasingly a gateway to society at large. In this article, the authors focus specifically on this 3rd wave of mobile computing, and in particular on what they call an inverted digital divide – a state where the mobile technology is in place for its users, but where there is no access to the services in society that rely on mobile computing. In this article, the authors demonstrate this inverted digital divide through a number of examples where they show how this plays out for different groups of people where this is vital in a global world – e.g., visitors to a country such as tourists, immigrants and even people applying for asylum. The authors discuss what is needed in order to bridge this divide and they outline its implications for the further development of mobile services. In concluding this paper, the authors suggest that “digital integration” might serve as a key notion for resolving these issues as we now enter the 3rd wave of mobile HCI.

National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145679 (URN)10.4018/IJMHCI.2018040103 (DOI)000431082900004 ()
Available from: 2018-03-14 Created: 2018-03-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Moradi, F. & Wiberg, M. (2018). NEAT-Lamp and Talking Tree: Beyond Personal Informatics towards Active Workplaces. Computers, 7(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>NEAT-Lamp and Talking Tree: Beyond Personal Informatics towards Active Workplaces
2018 (English)In: Computers, E-ISSN 2073-431X, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A growing number of personal informatics (PI) systems have been designed to break the habit of prolonged sitting and to encourage physical activity during workdays and leisure hours. Few studies, however, have investigated the nature of local movement and mobility in workspaces. Relatively little is known about how such movement patterns are shaped and in what ways micro-mobility in workplaces could be increased. By undertaking a concept-driven design approach, and on the basis of our ethnographic prestudy, we introduce a conceptual framework. In this conceptual framework, we indicate the five main agencies that shape local movement and mobility among office workers. On the basis of this empirical and conceptual work, two prototypes, the non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)-Lamp and Talking Tree, have been designed, implemented and observed in an office environment. This paper describes this design project and articulates the role of discussions in socially established settings in work environments in order to increase daily movement. The paper concludes by highlighting not only technology, but also collective reflections to spark behavioral change in office environments as social settings. 

Keywords
design, personal informatics, quantified self, workspace, ambient displays
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
människa-dator interaktion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150564 (URN)10.3390/computers7010004 (DOI)000434429200004 ()
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
Ågerfalk, P. & Wiberg, M. (2018). Pragmatizing the normative artifact: design science research in scandinavia and beyond. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 43(1), 68-77, Article ID 4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pragmatizing the normative artifact: design science research in scandinavia and beyond
2018 (English)In: Communications of the Association for Information Systems, ISSN 1529-3181, E-ISSN 1529-3181, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 68-77, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this panel report, we analyze the discussion that unfolded during the “Design Science Research: A Scandinavian Approach?” panel held at the third Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems in Sigtuna, Sweden, in August, 2012. The second author of this paper chaired the panel, which also included Tone Bratteteig, Shirley Gregor, Ola Henfridsson, Alan Hevner, Jan Pries-Heje, and Tuure Tuunanen as panelists. Three themes that highlight how the design of artifacts contributes to knowledge production emerged during the panel. The first theme addresses our responsibility, as a research community, to come up not only with descriptions of the world but also to try to change things into preferable states. The second theme emphasizes that knowledge production also happens through the design of artifacts. The third theme identifies an apparent pragmatic turn in our discipline. 

Keywords
Design, Design Science, Participatory Design, Scandinavian Approach, Action Research
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151421 (URN)10.17705/1CAIS.04304 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, M. (2018). The materiality of interaction: notes on the materials of interaction design. MIT Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The materiality of interaction: notes on the materials of interaction design
2018 (English)Book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2018. p. 192
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147261 (URN)9780262037518 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-01 Created: 2018-05-01 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Ghajargar, M. & Wiberg, M. (2018). Thinking with Interactive Artifacts: Reflection as a Concept in Design Outcomes. Design Issues, 34(2), 48-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thinking with Interactive Artifacts: Reflection as a Concept in Design Outcomes
2018 (English)In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reflection is a recurring notion in the HCI/interaction design literature. Throughout the years reflection has been highlighted as a key dimension of design thinking and as an important ingredient of design processes. In this paper we take stock in our community's interest in reflection, and we suggest that while it has been acknowledged as a cornerstone for design processes, it has been less explored as a basis for design outcomes. Given this extensive literature study, it seems that 1) the interest in this area is growing, and we present tables that illustrate this growing interest over time; 2) reflection and behavioral change are two interrelated notions; and 3) these notions are well-explored in our field. Further, we suggest that as interaction design is increasingly exploring the design of tangible, smart, connected, and even intelligent artifacts, we should think about how reflection and our ability to think with artifacts can be extended to include the design of interactive artifacts. In this paper we suggest how that might be done, and we point at a design space for designing such interactive artifacts to think with.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2018
Keywords
reflection, interactive artifacts, behavior change, materiality and tangibility
National Category
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146800 (URN)10.1162/DESI_a_00485 (DOI)000428944100005 ()
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, M. (2017). From interactables to architectonic interaction. interactions, 24(2), 62-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From interactables to architectonic interaction
2017 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 62-65Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140013 (URN)
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Jung, H., Wiltse, H., Wiberg, M. & Stolterman, E. (2017). Metaphors, materialities, and affordances: hybrid morphologies in the design of interactive artifacts. Design Studies, 53, 24-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metaphors, materialities, and affordances: hybrid morphologies in the design of interactive artifacts
2017 (English)In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 53, p. 24-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As materiality of interactive artifacts is diversified with integrated physical and digital materials, metaphoric design approaches in Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) go beyond resembling the appearance of physical objects, exploring novel materials and forms of interactive artifacts. The hybrid materialities and forms of artifacts influence how interactivity is perceived, reframing the concept of affordances according to its evolving relationship to metaphors and materialities. By conceptualizing interactive forms in their surface, behavioral and systemic aspects, we examine multifaceted roles of metaphors in HCI from concealing and revealing a formal system to expanding and reifying its meaning; and propose a morphologic perspective on affordances as an invitation for making variations of interactive forms by compositing multiple design resources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
design rationale, design theory, interaction design, interface design, materialities
National Category
Design
Research subject
design; industrial design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138497 (URN)10.1016/j.destud.2017.06.004 (DOI)000418213500002 ()
Available from: 2017-08-24 Created: 2017-08-24 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Kaptelinin, V., Björnfot, P., Danielsson, K. & Wiberg, M. (2017). Mobile Remote Presence Enhanced with Contactless Object Manipulation: An Exploratory Study. In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI '17, CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, CO, USA. May 06–11, 2017 (pp. 2690-2697). ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobile Remote Presence Enhanced with Contactless Object Manipulation: An Exploratory Study
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Press, 2017, p. 2690-2697Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A telepresence robot is a mobile telecommunication device, remotely controlled by its "pilot", which supports an embodied presence of the pilot in a different location (the "local setting"). A common problem with telepresence robots is their limited capability of interacting with the physical environment. A potential solution, explored in the present study, is supporting "double remote control" interaction, that is, making it possible for the pilot, in addition to remotely controlling the robot, to also remotely control objects in the local setting. In the study we enacted meaningful scenarios of employing telepresence robots with and without double remote control capabilities. The evidence collected in the study allows us to tentatively assess the effects of double remote control interaction on user experience and social context. Issues for future research are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Press, 2017
Keywords
telepresence robots, mobile remote presence, double remote interaction, user enactments
National Category
Human Aspects of ICT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139983 (URN)10.1145/3027063.3053204 (DOI)978-1-4503-4656-6 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI '17, CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, CO, USA. May 06–11, 2017
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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