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Jackson, J. A., Olsson, D., Burdorf, A., Punnett, L., Järvholm, B. & Wahlström, J. (2019). Occupational biomechanical risk factors for radial nerve entrapment in a 13-year prospective study among male construction workers. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 76(5), 326-331
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational biomechanical risk factors for radial nerve entrapment in a 13-year prospective study among male construction workers
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2019 (English)In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 326-331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The aim was to assess the association between occupational biomechanical exposure and the occurrence of radial nerve entrapment (RNE) in construction workers over a 13-year follow-up period.

METHODS: A cohort of 229 707 male construction workers who participated in a national occupational health surveillance programme (1971-1993) was examined prospectively (2001-2013) for RNE. Height, weight, age, smoking status and job title (construction trade) were obtained on health examination. RNE case status was defined by surgical release of RNE, with data from the Swedish national registry for out-patient surgery records. A job exposure matrix was developed, and biomechanical exposure estimates were assigned according to job title. Highly correlated exposures were summed into biomechanical exposure scores. Negative binomial models were used to estimate the relative risks (RR) (incidence rate ratios) of RNE surgical release for the biomechanical factors and exposure sum scores. Predicted incidence was assessed for each exposure score modelled as a continuous variable to assess exposure-response relationships.

RESULTS: The total incidence rate of surgically treated RNE over the 13-year observation period was 3.53 cases per 100 000 person-years. There were 92 cases with occupational information. Increased risk for RNE was seen in workers with elevated hand-grip forces (RR=1.79, 95% CI 0.97 to 3.28) and exposure to hand-arm vibration (RR=1.47, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.00).

CONCLUSIONS: Occupational exposure to forceful handgrip work and vibration increased the risk for surgical treatment of RNE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
elbow flexion/extension, hand tools, hand-arm vibration, job exposure matrix, nerve entrapment, neuropathy, repetitive, static work, upper extremity load
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157109 (URN)10.1136/oemed-2018-105311 (DOI)30850390 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Lewis, C. A., Jackson, J., Liv, P. & Wahlström, J. (2019). Occupational biomechanical risk factors for surgical treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in a 16-year prospective study among male construction workers. In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices. Paper presented at PREMUS 2019 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Muscoluskeletal Disorders, Bologna, Italy, 2-5 September, 2019 (pp. 165-165).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational biomechanical risk factors for surgical treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in a 16-year prospective study among male construction workers
2019 (English)In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices, 2019, p. 165-165Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Shoulder disorders are common in the general population, with an annual prevalence up to over 40% per 1000 person-years. One common disorder is subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), where a narrowing in the subacromial space causes compression of the tendons or bursa by the surrounding tissues. When conservative treatments are not effective, surgical treatments is often the alternative. The aim of the current study was to assess the association between occupational biomechanical exposures and the occurrence of surgically treated SIS in a large construction worker cohort over a 16-year follow-up period. 

Methods: A cohort of 280 747 male construction workers who participated in a national occupational health surveillance program (1971-1993) were examined prospectively (1987-2016) for SIS. SIS case status was defined by primary surgical treatment of diagnosis codes M75.1, M75.4, 726B, or 726C (ICD 10 and Swedish ICD 9 code systems), with data from the Swedish national registry for in- and out-patient surgery records. A job exposure matrix (JEM) was developed and biomechanical exposure estimates were assigned according to job title. Poisson regression models adjusted for age, BMI, smoking and a surgical time factor were used to estimate the relative risks (incidence rate ratios) of surgical treatment for SIS for each biomechanical factor.

Results: There were 1381 cases in the cohort, which corresponded to an incidence rate of surgically treated SIS over the 16-year observation period of 46 cases per 100,000 person years. Increased risk for surgically treated SIS was shown for working with elevated arms (RR=1.27, 95% CI=1.02-1.58), heavy upper arm loads (RR=1.75, 95% CI=1.48-2.08), high grip force (RR=1.64, 95% CI=1.40-1.93), working with hand tools (RR=1.46, 95% CI=1.26-1.70), working with hand tools in a fixed posture (RR=1.28, 95% CI=1.14-1.44), and working with hand-arm vibration (RR=1.30, 95% CI=1.09-1.55).

Conclusions: Working with elevated arms, high arm load, high grip force and vibrating handheld tools may increase the risk for SIS.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163186 (URN)
Conference
PREMUS 2019 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Muscoluskeletal Disorders, Bologna, Italy, 2-5 September, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J. A., Olsson, D., Punnett, L., Burdorf, A., Järvholm, B. & Wahlström, J. (2019). Occupational biomechanical risk factors for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment in a prospective study of male construction workers. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 45(1), 63-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational biomechanical risk factors for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment in a prospective study of male construction workers
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 63-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the association between occupational biomechanical exposures and occurrence of surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment (UNE).

Methods: A cohort of 229 689 male construction workers who participated in a national occupational health surveillance program (1971–1993) were examined prospectively over a 13-year case ascertainment period (2001–2013) for surgically treated UNE. Job title (construction trade), smoking status, height, weight and age were recorded on examination. Job titles were merged into occupational groups of workers performing similar work tasks and having similar training. Occupational biomechanical exposure estimates were assigned to each occupational group with a job exposure matrix (JEM) developed for the study. Negative binomial models were used to assess the relative risks for each biomechanical exposure and the sums of highly correlated biomechanical exposures. Surgical treatment of UNE was determined via a linkage with the Swedish Hospital Outpatient Surgery Register.

Results: There were 555 cases of surgically treated UNE within the cohort. Workers exposed to forceful hand-grip factors had a 1.4-fold higher relative risk (95% CI 1.18–1.63) of undergoing surgical treatment for UNE compared to unexposed workers. Occupational groups comprising workers exposed to forceful hand-grip work showed the highest risks for UNE and included concrete workers, floor layers, ground preparatory workers, rock blasters, and sheet-metal workers.

Conclusion: Forceful hand-grip work increases the risk for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordic Association of Occupational Safety and Health (NOROSH), 2019
Keywords
biomechanical, biomechanical risk factor, construction worker, cubital tunnel syndrome, elbow, elbow extension, grip force, hand tool, hand-arm vibration, HAV, JEM, job-exposure matrix, male construction worker, neuropathy, occupational biomechanical risk factor, prospective study, repetitive, risk factor, static work, ulnar nerve entrapment, upper-arm load
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152108 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3757 (DOI)000466176700007 ()30132781 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-01016
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Liv, P. & Wahlström, J. (2019). Occupational risk factors for hospitalization due to cervical disc disorder in a 29-year prospective study of Swedish male construction workers. In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices. Paper presented at PREMUS 2019 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Muscoluskeletal Disorders, Bologna, Italy, 2-5 September, 2019 (pp. 168-168).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational risk factors for hospitalization due to cervical disc disorder in a 29-year prospective study of Swedish male construction workers
2019 (English)In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices, 2019, p. 168-168Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this study was to assess the associations between individual and occupational exposure factors and hospitalization for cervical disc disorder (CDD).

Methods: CDD was examined prospectively in a cohort of 278 319 Swedish male construction workers who participated in a national health surveillance program (1971-1993). Job title, smoking status, age, height, and weight were recorded on examination. Case data were obtained through linkage with the Swedish national in-patient hospital registry for the period 1987 – 2016; case status was defined by primary diagnosis code M50.0 (ICD-10) or 722.0, 722.4, or 722.7 (ICD-9). A job exposure matrix was developed and occupational exposure estimates were assigned by job title. Self-reported estimates of pain/discomfort from a subset of 87 500 workers were also linked to the database. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the relative risks (RR) for the biomechanical and self-reported factors with adjustment for smoking status, age, BMI and surgical time period.

Results: There were 562 cases of hospitalization for CDD; the incidence rate was 8.0 cases per 100 000 during the 29-year follow-up period. Smoking status, age, BMI and height were all associated with increased risk (RR 1.21-3.16). Occupational exposure to static work in non-neutral or extreme neck postures, and time spent in awkward postures showed the highest associations with CDD hospitalization (RR = 1.62 – 2.10). Upper arm load and time with arms above shoulders were also associated with increased risk (RR = 1.50 – 1.58). Workers who reported experiencing pain ‘often’ or ‘very often’ during the previous year for any of the neck, shoulder or upper back regions had a 3-fold increase in risk relative to workers reporting no pain.

Conclusions: Occupational non-neutral neck posture was associated with increased risk of hospitalization for CDD. Our data also suggest an exposure-response relationship for self-reported neck pain/discomfort and risk of hospitalization for CDD.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163185 (URN)
Conference
PREMUS 2019 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Muscoluskeletal Disorders, Bologna, Italy, 2-5 September, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Wahlström, J., Liv, P. & Jackson, J. (2019). Occupational risk factors for surgically treated carpal tunnel syndrome: a prospective cohort study of 220,610 Swedish construction workers. In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices. Paper presented at PREMUS 2019 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Muscoluskeletal Disorders, Bologna, Italy, 2-5 September 2019 (pp. 141-141).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational risk factors for surgically treated carpal tunnel syndrome: a prospective cohort study of 220,610 Swedish construction workers
2019 (English)In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices, 2019, p. 141-141Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common upper extremity nerve entrapment syndrome . The aim of this study was to determine the association between occupational biomechanical exposures and occurrence of surgically treated CTS in construction workers over a 16-year follow-up.

Methods: A cohort of 220 610 male construction workers who participated in a national occupational health surveillance program (1971–1992) were examined prospectively (2001–2016) for surgically treated CTS. Cases were determined via a linkage with the Swedish Hospital Outpatient Register. Job title (construction trade), smoking status, height, weight and age were recorded on examination. Job titles were merged into occupational groups of workers performing similar work tasks and having similar training. Occupational biomechanical exposure estimates were assigned to each occupational group using a job exposure matrix (JEM) developed for the study. Poisson regression models were used to assess the relative risks for each biomechanical exposure. Relative risks were adjusted for age, surgical time period, BMI, and smoking status at first examination.

Results: There were 4048 cases of surgically treated CTS within the cohort which represented an incidence rate of 134 cases per 100 000 person years. Workers exposed to medium and high forceful handgrip factors had relative risks of 1.3 (95% CI 1.16-1.38) and 1.6 (95% CI 1.50-1.77), respectively, of undergoing surgical treatment for CTS compared to low exposed workers. Workers exposed to medium and high exposure to hand-arm vibration had relative risks of 1.3 (95% CI 1.19-1.34) and 1.2 (95% CI 1.07-1.28), respectively, of undergoing surgical treatment for CTS compared to low exposed workers.

Conclusions: In conclusion, forceful hand-grip work and exposure to hand-arm vibration increased the risk for surgically treated carpal tunnel syndrome.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163184 (URN)
Conference
PREMUS 2019 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Muscoluskeletal Disorders, Bologna, Italy, 2-5 September 2019
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Stjernbrandt, A., Pettersson, H., Liljelind, I., Nilsson, T. & Wahlström, J. (2019). Raynaud's phenomenon in Northern Sweden: a population-based nested case-control study. Rheumatology International, 39(2), 265-275
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Raynaud's phenomenon in Northern Sweden: a population-based nested case-control study
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2019 (English)In: Rheumatology International, ISSN 0172-8172, E-ISSN 1437-160X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 265-275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to determine the association between individual and external exposure factors, and the reporting of Raynaud’s phenomenon, with or without concomitant cold sensitivity. In a population-based nested case–control study, cases with Raynaud’s phenomenon (N = 578), and matched controls (N = 1156), were asked to respond to a questionnaire focusing on different risk factors. Univariate and multiple conditional logistic regression were performed. Analyses were stratified according to whether the cases reported cold sensitivity or not. In total, 1400 out of 1734 study subjects answered the questionnaire (response rate 80.7%). In the final multiple model, the factor with the strongest association to Raynaud’s phenomenon, with and without cold sensitivity, was previous frostbite affecting the hands (OR 12.44; 95% CI 5.84–26.52 and OR 4.01; 95% CI 1.78–9.01, respectively). Upper extremity nerve injury was associated to reporting Raynaud’s phenomenon and cold sensitivity (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.29–3.85), but not Raynaud’s phenomenon alone. Reporting any exposure to hand-arm vibration or cumulative cold exposure was significant in univariate analyses for cases with both Raynaud’s phenomenon and cold sensitivity, but not in the multiple model. Raynaud’s phenomenon is strongly associated to previous cold injury, with a larger effect size among those who also report cold sensitivity. The fact that only upper extremity nerve injury differed significantly between case groups in our multiple model offers additional support to the neural basis for cold sensitivity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Cold exposure, Epidemiology, Frostbite, Hand, Occupational exposure, Risk factors
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152083 (URN)10.1007/s00296-018-4133-y (DOI)000457425100009 ()30128730 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council, VLL-646641
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Marklund, S., Storm Mienna, C., Wahlström, J., Englund, E. & Wiesinger, B. (2019). Work ability and productivity among dentists: associations with musculoskeletal pain, stress, and sleep. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work ability and productivity among dentists: associations with musculoskeletal pain, stress, and sleep
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Work ability can be measured by the work ability index (WAI), and work-related questions measuring productivity loss in terms of quality and quantity of work. Dentists have high occupational risk of musculoskeletal pain and the exposure of ergonomic strain is already high during dental education. The aim was to evaluate work ability and productivity among dentists, and to identify gender differences and associations with sleep, stress, and reported frequent pain.

Methods: The study population comprised 187 dentists (123 women and 64 men) who had been working as dentists between 5 and 12 years. Participants completed a questionnaire regarding sleep, stress, presence of pain at different sites, work ability assessed by WAI, and productivity in terms of quality and quantity of work.

Results: Poor sleep quality and high level of stress were reported by 31% and 48.1% of participants, respectively, with no gender differences and no association with age. The prevalence of frequent pain ranged 6.4–46.5% with shoulders being the most prevalent site. Thirty-three percent reported reduced work ability. Poor sleep, high amount of stress, and multi-site pain were associated with decreased work ability.

Conclusions: A high prevalence of pain was shown among dentists. Decreased work ability in terms of productivity loss was associated with poor sleep quality, high amount of stress, and multi-site pain. Preventive actions at the workplace should promote good musculoskeletal health, and measures taken, both individual and organizational, to minimize the risk of high, persistent stress and work-related pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Dentist, Pain, Productivity, Sleep, Stress, Work ability
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164959 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01478-5 (DOI)000492568400001 ()31654126 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-19
Jackson, J. A., Olsson, D., Punnett, L., Burdorf, A., Järvholm, B. & Wahlström, J. (2018). Biomechanical risk factors for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment in a cohort of Swedish male construction workers.. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, Florence, August 26-30 , 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomechanical risk factors for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment in a cohort of Swedish male construction workers.
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152127 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, Florence, August 26-30 , 2018
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-01016
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2018-09-27
Carlsson, D., Wahlström, J., Burström, L., Hagberg, M., Lundström, R., Pettersson, H. & Nilsson, T. (2018). Can sensation of cold hands predict Raynaud’s phenomenon or paresthesia?. Occupational Medicine, 68(5), 314-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can sensation of cold hands predict Raynaud’s phenomenon or paresthesia?
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2018 (English)In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, Vol. 68, no 5, p. 314-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Raynaud's phenomenon and neurosensory symptoms are common after hand-arm vibration exposure. Knowledge of early signs of vibration injuries is needed. Aims: To investigate the risk of developing Raynaud's phenomenon and paraesthesia in relation to sensation of cold hands in a cohort of male employees at an engineering plant. Methods: We followed a cohort of male manual and office workers at an engineering plant in Sweden for 21 years. At baseline (1987 and 1992) and each follow-up (1992, 1997, 2002, 2008), we assessed sensation of cold, Raynaud's phenomenon and paraesthesia in the hands using questionnaires and measured vibration exposure. We calculated risk estimates with univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses and adjusted for vibration exposure and tobacco usage. Results: There were 241 study participants. During the study period, 21 individuals developed Raynaud's phenomenon and 43 developed paraesthesia. When adjusting the risk of developing Raynaud's phenomenon for vibration exposure and tobacco use, the odds ratios were between 6.0 and 6.3 (95% CI 2.2-17.0). We observed no increased risk for paraesthesia in relation to a sensation of cold hands. Conclusions: A sensation of cold hands was a risk factor for Raynaud's phenomenon. At the individual level, reporting a sensation of cold hands did not appear to be useful information to predict future development of Raynaud's phenomenon given a weak to moderate predictive value. For paraesthesia, the sensation of cold was not a risk factor and there was no predictive value at the individual level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
Hand-arm vibration, hand-arm vibration syndrome, Raynaud's phenomenon, paresthesia, sensation of cold
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141012 (URN)10.1093/occmed/kqy053 (DOI)000439653500005 ()
Note

Originally published in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Stjernbrandt, A., Carlsson, D., Pettersson, H., Liljelind, I., Nilsson, T. & Wahlström, J. (2018). Cold sensitivity and associated factors: a nested case–control study performed in Northern Sweden. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 91(7), 785-797
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cold sensitivity and associated factors: a nested case–control study performed in Northern Sweden
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2018 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 91, no 7, p. 785-797Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To identify possible risk factors for cold sensitivity, by comparing cases to controls with regard to demographic and anthropometric characteristics, previous illnesses and injuries as well as ambient exposures.

Methods Through a questionnaire responded to by the general population (n=12,627) cold sensitivity cases (n=502) and matched controls (n=1,004) were identified and asked to respond to a second questionnaire with focus on different aspects of cold sensitivity, hereditary factors, previous diseases, medication, tobacco use as well as exposure to ambient cold climate and hand-arm vibration (HAV).

Results In total, 997 out of 1506 study subjects answered the second questionnaire, 374 cases and 623 match controls. Identified risk factors among the cases were frostbite of the hands Odds Ratio (OR) 10.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.5-19.3), rheumatic disease OR 3.1 (95% CI 1.7-5.7), upper extremity nerve injury OR 2.0 (95% CI 1.3-3.0), and vascular disease OR 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-2.9). Sex differences in risk factors were HAV exposure for men and cold exposure for women increased the risk of cold sensitivity. Rheumatic diseases and migraine increased the risk of cold sensitivity among women but not among men.

Conclusions The present study shows that cold sensitivity is associated with both inherent factors, acquired conditions and external exposures. Among acquired conditions, frostbite, vascular disease, nerve injury, joint disorders and migraine are significantly related to the reporting of cold sensitivity. Among external exposures, both cold climate and HAV exposure are significantly associated to cold sensitivity, and thus suitable targets for primary preventive measures. There was a difference in risk factors related to sex. HAV exposure for men and cold exposure for women increased the risk of cold sensitivity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2018
Keywords
Cold exposure, Cold sensitivity, Frostbite, Hand, Raynaud’s phenomenon, Sweden
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141016 (URN)10.1007/s00420-018-1327-2 (DOI)000443357600002 ()29808434 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047665099 (Scopus ID)
Projects
CHINS
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form with title [Cold sensitivity and associated factors: a case-control study performed in northern Sweden]

Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2018-12-04Bibliographically approved
Projects
Identifying causes of musculoskeletal disorders and the long-term consequences using Swedish registers [2016-01016_Forte]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2359-509x

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