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Sulistyawati, S., Dwi Astuti, F., Rahmah Umniyati, S., Tunggul Satoto, T. B., Lazuardi, L., Nilsson, M., . . . Holmner, Å. (2019). Dengue Vector Control through Community Empowerment: Lessons Learned from a Community-Based Study in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(6), Article ID E1013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dengue Vector Control through Community Empowerment: Lessons Learned from a Community-Based Study in Yogyakarta, Indonesia
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 6, article id E1013Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Effort to control dengue transmission requires community participation to ensure its sustainability. We carried out a knowledge attitude and practice (KAP) survey of dengue prevention to inform the design of a vector control intervention. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in June⁻August 2014 among 521 households in two villages of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Demographic characteristics and KAP questions were asked using a self-managed questionnaire. Knowledge, attitudes and practice scores were summarized for the population according to sex, age, occupation and education. The average knowledge score was rather poor-3.7 out of 8-although both attitude and practice scores were good: 25.5 out of 32 and 9.2 out of 11 respectively. The best knowledge within the different groups were found among women, the age group 30⁻44 years, people with a university degree and government employees. Best practice scores were found among retired people and housewives. There were several significant gaps in knowledge with respect to basic dengue symptoms, preventive practices and biting and breeding habits of the Aedes mosquito. In contrast, people's practices were considered good, although many respondents failed to recognize outdoor containers as mosquito breeding sites. Accordingly, we developed a vector control card to support people's container cleaning practices. The card was assessed for eight consecutive weeks in 2015, with pre-post larvae positive houses and containers as primary outcome measures. The use of control cards reached a low engagement of the community. Despite ongoing campaigns aiming to engage the community in dengue prevention, knowledge levels were meagre and adherence to taught routines poor in many societal groups. To increase motivation levels, bottom-up strategies are needed to involve all community members in dengue control, not only those that already comply with best practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
community participation, dengue, empowerment, vector control
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157667 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16061013 (DOI)000465159500113 ()30897770 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Dubouis, G., Sovacool, B., Aall, C., Nilsson, M., Barbier, C., Herrmann, A., . . . Sauerborn, R. (2019). It starts at home? Climate policies targeting household consumption and behavioral decisions are key to low-carbon futures. Energy Research & Social Science, 52, 144-158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>It starts at home? Climate policies targeting household consumption and behavioral decisions are key to low-carbon futures
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2019 (English)In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 52, p. 144-158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Through their consumption behavior, households are responsible for 72% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, they are key actors in reaching the 1.5°C goal under the Paris Agreement. However, the possible contribution and position of households in climate policies is neither well understood, nor do households receive sufficiently high priority in current climate policy strategies. This paper investigates how behavioral change can achieve a substantial reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in European high-income countries. It uses theoretical thinking and some core results from the HOPE research project, which investigated household preferences for reducing emissions in four European cities in France, Germany, Norway and Sweden. The paper makes five major points: First, car and plane mobility, meat and dairy consumption, as well as heating are the most dominant components of household footprints. Second, household living situations (demographics, size of home) greatly influence the household potential to reduce their footprint, even more than country or city location. Third, household decisions can be sequential and temporally dynamic, shifting through different phases such as childhood, adulthood, and illness. Fourth, short term voluntary efforts will not be sufficient by themselves to achieve the drastic reductions needed to achieve the 1.5°C goal; instead, households need a regulatory framework supporting their behavioral changes. Fifth, there is a mismatch between the roles and responsibilities conveyed by current climate policies and household perceptions of responsibility. We then conclude with further recommendations for research and policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Deep decarbonisation, Climate change, Mitigation, Household decision-making, Behavioral wedge, Climate policy, Greenhouse gases
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157668 (URN)10.1016/j.erss.2019.02.001 (DOI)000468215900014 ()http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/81752 (Local ID)http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/81752 (Archive number)http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/81752 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 214-2014-1717
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Ramji, R., Nilsson, M., Arnetz, B., Wiklund, Y. & Arnetz, J. (2019). Taking a Stand: An Untapped Strategy to Reduce Waterpipe Smoking in Adolescents. Substance Use & Misuse, 54(3), 514-524
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking a Stand: An Untapped Strategy to Reduce Waterpipe Smoking in Adolescents
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2019 (English)In: Substance Use & Misuse, ISSN 1082-6084, E-ISSN 1532-2491, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 514-524Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Waterpipe use amongst adolescents is on the rise globally. Thus, there is a need to understand adolescents 'attitudes towards and perceptions of waterpipe use in order to develop specific interventions against this form of tobacco use.

METHODS: Focus group interviews were conducted among 37 Swedish adolescents (14 boys and 23 girls) from grades 10 to 12. Waterpipe users and nonusers were interviewed separately, with two groups each for users and nonusers. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and thematically analyzed using content analysis.

RESULTS: Six themes emerged including taking a stand, weighing the risks, Lack of knowledge, Social context, Waterpipe new and unknown, and Family influence. Taking a stand was about being able to stand up for one's owns views rather than giving in to peer pressure to smoke waterpipe. Participants feared harming others via secondhand smoke and expressed criticism of the tobacco industry. Participants considered the health consequences and feared addiction. Lack of knowledge concerning health effects of waterpipe smoking due to the unavailability of credible information was also reported. Waterpipe smoking was considered a social event carried out in the company of friends. Perceived as novel and fun, waterpipe was smoked out of curiosity. Parents' and siblings' smoking behaviors influenced adolescent waterpipe use.

CONCLUSION: Adolescents reported lacking information about the possible health effects of waterpipe smoking and that gaining such knowledge would make it easier for them to take a stand and refuse smoking waterpipe. Prevention strategies should focus on providing adolescents with factual information about the dangers of waterpipe use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Hookah/shisha, addiction, adolescents, attitudes, qualitative study, tobacco
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155914 (URN)10.1080/10826084.2018.1521429 (DOI)000462920000015 ()30688142 (PubMedID)
Funder
Public Health Agency of Sweden , 1059/2014-6.2
Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved
Friberg, P., Alfvén, T., Helldén, D., Nilsson, M., Nordenstedt, H. & Tomson, G. (2018). Global hälsa nyckel till social, ekologisk och ekonomisk hållbarhet. Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, 95(2), 199-205
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global hälsa nyckel till social, ekologisk och ekonomisk hållbarhet
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2018 (Swedish)In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 199-205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154383 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Sköld, B., Baltruszewicz, M., Aall, C., Andersson, C., Herrmann, A., Amelung, D., . . . Sauerborn, R. (2018). Household Preferences to Reduce Their Greenhouse Gas Footprint: A Comparative Study from Four European Cities. Sustainability, 10(11), Article ID 4044.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Household Preferences to Reduce Their Greenhouse Gas Footprint: A Comparative Study from Four European Cities
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2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 11, article id 4044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates households’ preferences to reduce their carbon footprint (CF) measured in carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e). It assumes that a substantial CF reduction of households is essential to reach the 1.5 ◦C goal under the Paris Agreement. Data was collected in four mid-size cities in France, Germany, Norway, and Sweden. Quantitative data was obtained from 308 households using a CF calculator based on a questionnaire, and a simulation game. The latter investigated households’ preferences when being confronted with the objective to reduce their CF by 50 percent by 2030 in a voluntary and forced scenario. Our results show that the greater the CO2e-reduction potential of a mitigation action, the less willing a household was to implement that action. Households preferred actions with moderate lifestyle changes foremost in the food sector. Voluntarily, households reached a 25% footprint reduction by 2030. To reach a substantial reduction of 50 percent, households needed to choose actions that meant considerable lifestyle changes, mainly related to mobility. Given our results, the 1.5 ◦C goal is unlikely to be realizable currently, unless households receive major policy support. Lastly, the strikingly similar preferences of households in the four European cities investigated seem to justify strong EU and international policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
Greenhouse gases, CO2, emission, households, preferences, climate change, mitigation, Paris agreement, Europe, carbon footprint
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154008 (URN)10.3390/su10114044 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Furberg, M., Hondula, D., Saha, M. & Nilsson, M. (2018). In the light of change: a mixed methods investigation of climate perceptions and the instrumental record in northern  Sweden. Population and environment, 40(1), 67-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In the light of change: a mixed methods investigation of climate perceptions and the instrumental record in northern  Sweden
2018 (English)In: Population and environment, ISSN 0199-0039, E-ISSN 1573-7810, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 67-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Significant climate change in the Arctic has been observed by indigenous peoples and reported in scientific literature, but there has been little research comparing these two knowledge bases. In this study, Sami reindeer herder interviews and observational weather data were combined to provide a comprehensive description of climate changes in Northern Sweden. The interviewees described warmer winters, shorter snow seasons and cold periods, and increased temperature variability. Weather data supported three of these four observed changes; the only change not evident in the weather data was increased temperature variability. Winter temperatures increased, the number of days in cold periods was significantly reduced, and some stations displayed a 2 month-shorter snow cover season. Interviewees reported that these changes to the wintertime climate are significant, impact their identity, and threaten their livelihood. If consistency between human observations of changing weather patterns and the instrumental meteorological record is observed elsewhere, mixed methods research like this study can produce a clearer, more societally relevant understanding of how the climate is changing and the impacts of those changes on human well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Climate change, Indigenous peoples, Mixed methods, Reindeer herding, Cold spells, Variability
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126961 (URN)10.1007/s11111-018-0302-x (DOI)000443980800003 ()30220761 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2016-10-24 Created: 2016-10-24 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Boij, A., Nilsson, M. & Tillgren, P. (2018). Kunskapsbaserat tobaksförebyggande arbete i skolan: A Non Smoking Generations (NSG) flerkomponentsprogram. Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, 95(4), 421-433
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kunskapsbaserat tobaksförebyggande arbete i skolan: A Non Smoking Generations (NSG) flerkomponentsprogram
2018 (Swedish)In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 421-433Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Den idéburna organisationen A Non Smoking Generation utvecklade under 2010–2017 ett kunskaps- och teoribaserat tobaksförebyggande flerkomponentsprogram för grund- och gymnasieskola tillsammans med en tvärvetenskaplig rådgivande forskargrupp. Här beskrivs programutvecklingsarbetet och genomförandet i fyra svenska kommuner, graden av engagemang och stöd för genomförandet samt elevernas syn på policy och lagar rörande tobak. Programmets teoretiska ramverk utgick från teorier och kunskap om förändringsberedskap, risk- och skyddsfaktorer, implementering, samt den processmodell som utvecklades och tillämpades i projektet. Alla skolor i kommunerna gick under projekttiden från att ha en lägre förändringsberedskap att arbeta tobaksförebyggande till en högre. I slutet av projektet var de tobaksspecifika skyddsfaktorerna inkluderade i tobakspolicys som tillämpades och andelen elever som kände till tobakspolicyn hade ökat. Resultaten visade också att kommunernas skolor hade kunnat tillämpa och kommit långt i arbetet med processmodellen. Av intervjuerna framkom att de var mycket nöjda med modellen och ansåg att den var lätt att arbeta utifrån och hålla fast vid i framtida arbete.

Abstract [en]

During 2010-2017 the Non governmental organization, A Non Smoking Generation, together with a cross disciplinary advisory research group, developed a knowledge and theory based multi component tobacco prevention program for primary and secondary schools. This article describes the program development and the implementation in four Swedish municipalities, the degree of commitment and support for implementation and the student´s views on policies and laws regarding tobacco. The theoretical framework of the program was based on theories and knowledge of readiness for change, riskand protective factors, implementation, and the process model developed and applied in the project. During the project all schools in the four municipalities moved from a low level of readiness to a higher to work tobacco preventive. At the end of the project the tobacco specific protective factors were included in the schools tobacco policy, they were applied and the proportion of student´s who knew about the policy had increased. The results showed that the municipalities’ schools had applied the process model and had come a long way working with it. The interviews also revealed that they were very pleased with the model and considered it easy to use and sustain in the future work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Socialmedicinsk tidskrift, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154384 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Herrmann, A., Amelung, D., Fischer, H., Wilkinson, P., Nilsson, M., Barbier, C., . . . Sauerborn, R. (2018). Promoting health under the Paris Climate Agreement: results from a European mixed-methods study. Paper presented at 11th European Public Health Conference Winds of change: towards new ways of improving public health in Europe Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November–1 December, 2018.. European Journal of Public Health, 28, 170-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promoting health under the Paris Climate Agreement: results from a European mixed-methods study
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 170-170Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157986 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky213.498 (DOI)000461384200415 ()
Conference
11th European Public Health Conference Winds of change: towards new ways of improving public health in Europe Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November–1 December, 2018.
Note

Supplement 4

Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Watts, N., Amann, M., Ayeb-Karlsson, S., Belesova, K., Bouley, T., Boykoff, M., . . . Costello, A. (2018). The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: from 25 years of inaction to a global transformation for public health. The Lancet, 391(10120), 581-630
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: from 25 years of inaction to a global transformation for public health
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2018 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 391, no 10120, p. 581-630Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Lancet Countdown tracks progress on health and climate change and provides an independent assessment of the health effects of climate change, the implementation of the Paris Agreement, 1 and the health implications of these actions. It follows on from the work of the 2015 Lancet Commission on Health and Climate Change, 2 which concluded that anthropogenic climate change threatens to undermine the past 50 years of gains in public health, and conversely, that a comprehensive response to climate change could be "the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century". The Lancet Countdown is a collaboration between 24 academic institutions and intergovernmental organisations based in every continent and with representation from a wide range of disciplines. The collaboration includes climate scientists, ecologists, economists, engineers, experts in energy, food, and transport systems, geographers, mathematicians, social and political scientists, public health professionals, and doctors. It reports annual indicators across five sections: climate change impacts, exposures, and vulnerability; adaptation planning and resilience for health; mitigation actions and health co-benefits; economics and finance; and public and political engagement. The key messages from the 40 indicators in the Lancet Countdown's 2017 report are summarised below.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143784 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32464-9 (DOI)000424649400035 ()29096948 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ramji, R., Arnetz, B., Nilsson, M., Wiklund, Y., Jamil, H., Maziak, W. & Arnetz, J. (2018). Waterpipe use in adolescents in Northern Sweden: Association with mental well-being and risk and health behaviours. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 46(8), 867-876
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waterpipe use in adolescents in Northern Sweden: Association with mental well-being and risk and health behaviours
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 867-876Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: There is a lack of studies examining the association between waterpipe smoking and mental well-being among adolescents. This study sought to determine whether waterpipe smoking is associated with mental well-being and other risk and health behaviours in adolescents.

METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to 1006 adolescents in grades 9-12 (with a response rate of >95%), containing questions on measures of stress, mental energy and sleep. In addition, the questionnaire assessed risk and health behaviours, including use of a waterpipe, cigarettes, e-cigarettes, snus, alcohol, narcotics, gambling and exercise. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with waterpipe use.

RESULTS: Thirty-seven per cent ( n=371) of the participants had used a waterpipe at some point. Waterpipe use was associated with lower mental energy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81-0.99), higher stress (OR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.20) and use of cigarettes (OR = 3.82, 95% CI 2.33-6.03), e-cigarettes (OR = 3.26, 95% CI 2.12-4.99), snus (OR = 2.29, 95% CI 2.12-4.99), alcohol (OR = 1.92, 95% CI 1.07-3.44) and narcotics (OR = 3.64, 95% CI 1.75-7.58). Waterpipe use was not significantly associated with gambling, exercise or sleep quality.

CONCLUSIONS: Waterpipe use in adolescents is associated with worse mental well-being, as well as use of other nicotine products, alcohol and narcotics. Prospective studies are needed to delineate causal and temporal relationships further between waterpipe use and mental well-being and its relationship to other risky behaviours in order to design effective prevention programs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Hookah/shisha, e-cigarette, high-school students, risk behaviour, snus
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143799 (URN)10.1177/1403494817746534 (DOI)000452310700011 ()29226800 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042093073 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-00033036-8546

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